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August 28, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
The Olympic flame arrived on South Korean soil Saturday, 21 days before the opening of the Games of the XXIV Olympiad in Seoul, and was greeted by a thunderstorm, children in bright costumes performing traditional folk dances of Cheju Island--and shamans. The shamans, who worship animist spirits, were unable to chase away the rain showers, but that wasn't high on their list of priorities. Their role was to exorcise the demons that threaten the Seoul Olympics.
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NEWS
October 15, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders throughout history have used war to distract their domestic critics. South Korean President Kim Dae Jung may find himself hoping that his Nobel Peace Prize can have the same effect. Kim has come under his share of brickbats in recent months in both the political and the economic arenas.
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NEWS
September 18, 1989 | From Reuters
More than 150 people were killed in traffic accidents over South Korea's full-moon festival holiday, police said Sunday.
NEWS
August 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
South Korea celebrated the 50th anniversary of its birth as a republic on Saturday by releasing 2,174 prisoners, including more than 100 political prisoners. Those freed were among 7,007 prisoners granted amnesty by President Kim Dae Jung on Friday to mark the day that is also the 53rd anniversary of the peninsula's liberation from Japanese rule. Prison officers said the 2,174 prisoners were released on parole at 10 a.m. Saturday.
SPORTS
September 18, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. delegation was called rude and insensitive for the behavior of many of its athletes Saturday at the Summer Olympics' opening ceremony. "As one of the leading countries in the Olympic Games, with a special role here in Korea, they should have thought, 'Let's not act like total klutzes,' " said Richard Pound, an International Olympic Committee vice president from Montreal. "I don't think that's the image the United States wants to be spreading around the world."
NEWS
October 15, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders throughout history have used war to distract their domestic critics. South Korean President Kim Dae Jung may find himself hoping that his Nobel Peace Prize can have the same effect. Kim has come under his share of brickbats in recent months in both the political and the economic arenas.
SPORTS
October 3, 1988 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
The closing ceremony was a choreography of Korean culture: Cymbal Dances, Fan Dances, Lantern Dances. A Bridge Created by Magpies. Parting Ships. Complicated affairs with as many 750 costumed dancers at a time, twirling ribbons (from their hats!) and carrying banners, filling the Olympic Stadium floor with color and movement. Yet what do you remember when it is all done? You remember that great global conga line, the entry of athletes. Afghanistan to Zimbabwe, and Qatar in between.
SPORTS
September 17, 1988 | MIKE DOWNEY
I see distant boats, hundreds of boats, beautiful boats, bobbing and weaving through the turquoise waters of the shimmering river, crimson sun behind them, cloudless sky above, 160 windsurfers for company, one for every country in the Olympics, their sails flapping, their fingers gripping, their boards boogeying toward the YongDong Bridge, the bridge on the river Han.
NEWS
August 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
South Korea celebrated the 50th anniversary of its birth as a republic on Saturday by releasing 2,174 prisoners, including more than 100 political prisoners. Those freed were among 7,007 prisoners granted amnesty by President Kim Dae Jung on Friday to mark the day that is also the 53rd anniversary of the peninsula's liberation from Japanese rule. Prison officers said the 2,174 prisoners were released on parole at 10 a.m. Saturday.
NEWS
September 13, 1988 | SAM JAMESON and RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writers
To Min Hyoung Cha and many other South Koreans, the 24th Summer Olympics has become a bore. Banners hanging from virtually every office building, floral displays, welcome arches, fireworks, parades and festivals all have been organized by the government, said Min, a marketing specialist. "None of it is spontaneous," he complained. One disgruntled hotel hostess agreed, declaring: "It's as if the country existed for the Olympics."
NEWS
October 1, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yun Dal Yong, 57, the fourth son in a family with nine children, was not sure how many relatives had gathered in his home Thursday morning to honor ancestors in this farming village nestled against a tree-capped hill north of Seoul. But about 100 attended the main ceremony to venerate the last four male generations of Yuns. It was held at the nearby home of his uncle, the patriarch of the current Yun clan.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korea on Wednesday celebrated the 45th anniversary of its liberation from Japanese colonization with a ritual of fiery student protest. More than 10,000 demonstrators battled riot police at the gates of Yonsei University in western Seoul in a futile attempt to march to the border with North Korea for a Communist-sponsored reunification rally. Policemen fired tear gas into the throng of students, who scattered and regrouped to respond with firebombs and rocks.
NEWS
September 18, 1989 | From Reuters
More than 150 people were killed in traffic accidents over South Korea's full-moon festival holiday, police said Sunday.
SPORTS
October 3, 1988 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
The closing ceremony was a choreography of Korean culture: Cymbal Dances, Fan Dances, Lantern Dances. A Bridge Created by Magpies. Parting Ships. Complicated affairs with as many 750 costumed dancers at a time, twirling ribbons (from their hats!) and carrying banners, filling the Olympic Stadium floor with color and movement. Yet what do you remember when it is all done? You remember that great global conga line, the entry of athletes. Afghanistan to Zimbabwe, and Qatar in between.
SPORTS
October 1, 1988 | From United Press International
Terry Schroeder, captain of the U.S. water polo team, will carry the American flag at the Olympics' closing ceremony Sunday. The three-time Olympian was selected in a vote by captains of the various U.S. teams. Others nominated included diver Greg Louganis, swimmer Matt Biondi, volleyball player Karch Kiraly, discus thrower Mac Wilkins, equestrian rider Jessica Ransehousen and field hockey player Patty Shea. At the time of the vote, Biondi and Louganis already had returned home.
SPORTS
September 18, 1988 | DAVID L. WOLPER, Special to The Times: David L. Wolper is a motion picture and television producer. He was a vice president of the L.A. Olympic Organizing Committee and producer of the opening and closing ceremonies in 1984.
Four years ago, as the Los Angeles Olympic opening ceremony came to an end, I looked onto the field from my control booth high above the Coliseum floor. Fifteen thousand people--athletes, dancers, singers, placard bearers and members of Los Angeles' diverse ethnic community--were all holding hands, dancing, singing and yes, many crying. It was an overwhelming display of emotion. A conclusion to a goose-bump-filled ceremony.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korea on Wednesday celebrated the 45th anniversary of its liberation from Japanese colonization with a ritual of fiery student protest. More than 10,000 demonstrators battled riot police at the gates of Yonsei University in western Seoul in a futile attempt to march to the border with North Korea for a Communist-sponsored reunification rally. Policemen fired tear gas into the throng of students, who scattered and regrouped to respond with firebombs and rocks.
SPORTS
September 18, 1988 | DAVID L. WOLPER, Special to The Times: David L. Wolper is a motion picture and television producer. He was a vice president of the L.A. Olympic Organizing Committee and producer of the opening and closing ceremonies in 1984.
Four years ago, as the Los Angeles Olympic opening ceremony came to an end, I looked onto the field from my control booth high above the Coliseum floor. Fifteen thousand people--athletes, dancers, singers, placard bearers and members of Los Angeles' diverse ethnic community--were all holding hands, dancing, singing and yes, many crying. It was an overwhelming display of emotion. A conclusion to a goose-bump-filled ceremony.
SPORTS
September 18, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. delegation was called rude and insensitive for the behavior of many of its athletes Saturday at the Summer Olympics' opening ceremony. "As one of the leading countries in the Olympic Games, with a special role here in Korea, they should have thought, 'Let's not act like total klutzes,' " said Richard Pound, an International Olympic Committee vice president from Montreal. "I don't think that's the image the United States wants to be spreading around the world."
SPORTS
September 17, 1988 | MIKE DOWNEY
I see distant boats, hundreds of boats, beautiful boats, bobbing and weaving through the turquoise waters of the shimmering river, crimson sun behind them, cloudless sky above, 160 windsurfers for company, one for every country in the Olympics, their sails flapping, their fingers gripping, their boards boogeying toward the YongDong Bridge, the bridge on the river Han.
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