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South Korea Constitutions

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April 29, 1987
Students fought police on campuses across South Korea, and hundreds of Protestant and Roman Catholic clergy joined in fasts and protests of President Chun Doo Hwan's refusal to consider constitutional reform. Officials said 4,000 students conducted rallies at 18 universities in Seoul and elsewhere and that most ended in clashes with riot police. Chun announced April 13 that all debate on constitutional change will be halted until after next year's Summer Olympics.
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NEWS
October 13, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
The National Assembly voted Monday to approve the framework for transforming South Korea into a democracy. By a vote of 254 to 4, the assembly approved sweeping amendments aimed at stripping authoritarian powers from the constitution that President Chun Doo Hwan imposed under martial law in 1980. For the first time in South Korea's 39-year history, the reforms were worked out in negotiations between the ruling party and the major opposition parties.
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NEWS
June 24, 1987 | Sam Jameson and Nick B. Williams Jr., Times Staff Writers
An angry Kim Young Sam, leader of South Korea's major opposition party, emerged from his first-ever meeting with President Chun Doo Hwan today and said they had failed to reach any agreement to resolve the nation's political turmoil. Kim told a news conference he had warned Chun that a continuation of his government's repressive policies would bring him the same fate those policies had wrought on former Presidents Syngman Rhee and Park Chun Hee.
NEWS
September 19, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
A bill amending the constitution was submitted Friday to the National Assembly. If approved as expected, it would open a new era of democracy in South Korea and allow direct election of the president for the first time in 16 years. The constitution bill was sponsored by all but eight of the 272 members of the National Assembly, which is to vote on it Oct. 12. It will be put to a national referendum Oct.
NEWS
June 24, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
For President Chun Doo Hwan, a new source of criticism has emerged: his ruling Democratic Justice Party. South Korean newspapers published detailed accounts Tuesday of an explosion of frustration with Chun and the ruling party leadership that took place Sunday at a caucus of party members in the National Assembly. A Western diplomat called it an example of free reporting without precedent in this country.
NEWS
June 18, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz on Wednesday urged South Korean President Chun Doo Hwan to renew suspended negotiations on political reform, but he said the United States will not "go around twisting people's arms." In his first detailed explanation of U.S. policy toward South Korea since the latest round of anti-government demonstrations broke out last week, Shultz said Washington must display patience while trying to nudge South Korea toward full democracy.
NEWS
June 25, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr. and SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writers
The main South Korean opposition party, saying that its leader's political talks with President Chun Doo Hwan earlier in the day were a failure, late Wednesday threw its weight behind a major street protest scheduled for Friday. "The top-level meeting today broke down," said Kim Tae Ryong, spokesman for the opposition Reunification Democratic Party. "We have no other choice but to stage struggle by peaceful and nonviolent means along with all democratic forces."
NEWS
April 13, 1987 | United Press International
President Chun Doo Hwan announced today that he is cutting off negotiations with the opposition on how to elect his successor, saying that "time has run out" to rewrite the constitution before he steps down in February, 1988. In a nationwide television address, Chun effectively rejected the opposition's demands for direct presidential elections, saying the next leader would be chosen later this year through the current system of indirect election by an electoral college.
NEWS
April 12, 1987 | Associated Press
President Chun Doo Hwan intends to muzzle constitutional debate in Parliament and to keep the present electoral college system for choosing his successor next year, officials of his party indicated Saturday. An official of Chun's Democratic Justice Party, speaking on condition that he not be identified, said: "Our parliamentary-cabinet system is the bottom line and uncompromising. If we cannot put it through, all constitutional debate should be shelved until 1989."
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
President Chun Doo Hwan's ruling party said Saturday that the country's first popular presidential election in 16 years must be held by Dec. 20 and called on opposition leaders to submit their proposals this week for constitutional changes that will permit such a vote.
NEWS
July 21, 1987 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
President Chun Doo Hwan's ruling party on Monday completed a proposed draft of a new national constitution that would bar opposition leader Kim Dae Jung from running for president later this year. The Democratic Justice Party's proposed charter, which must still be given final approval in a party caucus on Wednesday, also differs radically from the opposition's proposal in the key areas of voting age and the creation of a post of vice president.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
President Chun Doo Hwan's ruling party said Saturday that the country's first popular presidential election in 16 years must be held by Dec. 20 and called on opposition leaders to submit their proposals this week for constitutional changes that will permit such a vote.
NEWS
June 29, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr. and MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writers
Roh Tae Woo, chairman of South Korea's embattled ruling party, this morning made a startling call for a series of political reforms that met the opposition's key demands, including direct presidential elections. "The people are the masters of this country," Roh said, "and the people's will comes before anything."
NEWS
June 25, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr. and SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writers
The main South Korean opposition party, saying that its leader's political talks with President Chun Doo Hwan earlier in the day were a failure, late Wednesday threw its weight behind a major street protest scheduled for Friday. "The top-level meeting today broke down," said Kim Tae Ryong, spokesman for the opposition Reunification Democratic Party. "We have no other choice but to stage struggle by peaceful and nonviolent means along with all democratic forces."
NEWS
June 25, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Gaston J. Sigur, the State Department's top Asia specialist, said here today that he has told President Chun Doo Hwan the United States opposes "any use of the (South Korean) armed forces" to suppress protests in South Korea. But when asked whether he had received assurances that the military will not be deployed, he replied: "All I can tell you on that is that our position is crystal clear. We oppose martial law. We would hate to see anything like that happen.
NEWS
June 24, 1987 | Sam Jameson and Nick B. Williams Jr., Times Staff Writers
An angry Kim Young Sam, leader of South Korea's major opposition party, emerged from his first-ever meeting with President Chun Doo Hwan today and said they had failed to reach any agreement to resolve the nation's political turmoil. Kim told a news conference he had warned Chun that a continuation of his government's repressive policies would bring him the same fate those policies had wrought on former Presidents Syngman Rhee and Park Chun Hee.
NEWS
September 19, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
A bill amending the constitution was submitted Friday to the National Assembly. If approved as expected, it would open a new era of democracy in South Korea and allow direct election of the president for the first time in 16 years. The constitution bill was sponsored by all but eight of the 272 members of the National Assembly, which is to vote on it Oct. 12. It will be put to a national referendum Oct.
NEWS
June 25, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Gaston J. Sigur, the State Department's top Asia specialist, said here today that he has told President Chun Doo Hwan the United States opposes "any use of the (South Korean) armed forces" to suppress protests in South Korea. But when asked whether he had received assurances that the military will not be deployed, he replied: "All I can tell you on that is that our position is crystal clear. We oppose martial law. We would hate to see anything like that happen.
NEWS
June 24, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
For President Chun Doo Hwan, a new source of criticism has emerged: his ruling Democratic Justice Party. South Korean newspapers published detailed accounts Tuesday of an explosion of frustration with Chun and the ruling party leadership that took place Sunday at a caucus of party members in the National Assembly. A Western diplomat called it an example of free reporting without precedent in this country.
NEWS
June 22, 1987 | SAM JAMESON and NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writers
President Chun Doo Hwan agreed today to meet with opposition leader Kim Young Sam in an effort to settle a political crisis and end violent anti-government demonstrations, the chairman of the ruling party said. Roh Tae Woo, the presidential candidate of Chun's Democratic Justice Party, also indicated strongly that the party was prepared to reopen debate on constitutional revision--one of the key demands of the opposition. Roh spoke to reporters after a one-hour meeting with Chun.
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