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South Korea Contracts

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BUSINESS
May 16, 1992
McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Co. said Friday that it has won two contracts to launch satellites for South Korea in a deal valued at roughly $100 million. Space Systems' Delta II rocket will carry two telecommunications satellites into orbit for Korea Telecom in April, 1995, and October, 1995. The government organization selected Space Systems over four other bidders.
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BUSINESS
October 20, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Hyundai Motor Co.'s successful auction bid for bankrupt South Korean Kia Motors Corp. won't result in significant changes to Kia's U.S. operations, a top executive of the Irvine-based U.S. unit said. "The U.S. consumer won't see any changes," said Dick Macedo, vice president of sales and marketing at Kia Motors America. Hyundai and Kia will probably maintain separate brands and dealerships in the U.S.
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BUSINESS
December 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
GE Wins Korea Project: General Electric Co. has won a $400-million project to launch South Korea's first satellite, published reports said. Korean newspapers, quoting government sources, said the Korean government selected General Electric of Fairfield, Conn., over British Aerospace of Great Britain as the main manufacturer of a telecommunications satellite to be launched in 1995. A spokesman for GE Aerospace, the GE unit in Valley Forge, Penn.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1998 | Reuters
Qualcomm Inc. said it is cutting 700 temporary jobs and that second-quarter earnings will fall short of first-quarter levels due mainly to canceled orders from South Korea customers. The San Diego-based communications company did not detail how much earnings would fall. In the first quarter the company reported earnings of $36.7 million, or 50 cents per diluted share, on revenues of $785.8 million. In the comparable year-ago quarter it posted profit of $16.7 million, or 23 cents.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1988 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
KNBC Channel 4 won't be the only Los Angeles TV station broadcasting the Summer Olympics this month. Foreign-language station KSCI-TV Channel 18, the beneficiary of a Korean government deal with NBC, will be allowed to air Korean-language coverage of the Seoul games in prime time opposite the English-language coverage on KNBC. The KSCI coverage, which will be supplied by the government-owned Korean Broadcasting System, will begin Sept. 20 and will run Tuesday through Friday, from 8:30-11 p.m.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1998 | Reuters
Qualcomm Inc. said it is cutting 700 temporary jobs and that second-quarter earnings will fall short of first-quarter levels due mainly to canceled orders from South Korea customers. The San Diego-based communications company did not detail how much earnings would fall. In the first quarter the company reported earnings of $36.7 million, or 50 cents per diluted share, on revenues of $785.8 million. In the comparable year-ago quarter it posted profit of $16.7 million, or 23 cents.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Hyundai Motor Co.'s successful auction bid for bankrupt South Korean Kia Motors Corp. won't result in significant changes to Kia's U.S. operations, a top executive of the Irvine-based U.S. unit said. "The U.S. consumer won't see any changes," said Dick Macedo, vice president of sales and marketing at Kia Motors America. Hyundai and Kia will probably maintain separate brands and dealerships in the U.S.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
AT&T Signs Five-Year Deal: Under the contract, the company could sell up to $1 billion worth of computers to the South Korean government and two of that country's largest electronics companies, it said. It's the largest contract AT&T's Global Information Solutions computer unit has signed in Asia. The renewable contract is worth $50 million in 1995, and can be expanded to $1 billion over five years, AT&T said. It plans to sell 500 systems to the Korean government and to Samsung Electronics Co.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Arrangements that Northrop entered with Koreans to seek their help in marketing the F-20 jet fighter contained "grave defects" and were part of a plan to influence the South Korean government, according to an investigative report prepared for high-level officials in the Seoul government. Some of the people linked to the Northrop deals were considered to be "gangsters" and "known hoodlums," the report said.
NEWS
December 2, 1987 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
Former White House counsel Fred F. Fielding, testifying at the perjury trial of Michael K. Deaver, said Tuesday that he repeatedly warned the former White House aide and his business associates against lobbying presidential assistants. But Fielding told jurors that Deaver, soon after resigning as President Reagan's deputy chief of staff in May, 1985, insisted that he must speak with then-National Security Adviser Robert C. McFarlane about a Caribbean tax issue for which he was lobbying.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
AT&T Signs Five-Year Deal: Under the contract, the company could sell up to $1 billion worth of computers to the South Korean government and two of that country's largest electronics companies, it said. It's the largest contract AT&T's Global Information Solutions computer unit has signed in Asia. The renewable contract is worth $50 million in 1995, and can be expanded to $1 billion over five years, AT&T said. It plans to sell 500 systems to the Korean government and to Samsung Electronics Co.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1993 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a five-year investigation, the Justice Department is dropping its probe into allegations that Northrop Corp. and its key executives bribed South Korean officials in an effort to sell the F-20 jet fighter, according to legal sources and Justice Department correspondence.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1992
McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Co. said Friday that it has won two contracts to launch satellites for South Korea in a deal valued at roughly $100 million. Space Systems' Delta II rocket will carry two telecommunications satellites into orbit for Korea Telecom in April, 1995, and October, 1995. The government organization selected Space Systems over four other bidders.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Seoul Seizes Documents Linked to Northrop Case: South Korea's Justice Ministry, acting at the request of U.S. officials, impounded bank account papers involving the family of the late Park Chong Kyu, a one-time political power broker and presidential aide, sources said. Northrop Corp., the Los Angeles-based aerospace company, hired Park as a sales agent in the early 1980s. A U.S.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1991
Pollution Research and Control Corp., a Glendale supplier of pollution measuring instruments, said it has received three foreign contracts worth more than $1.2 million for its air pollution monitoring equipment. The largest contract, from the South Korean Environmental Protection Agency, is worth at least $630,000 and could go as high as $900,000 if the agency buys optional spare parts.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
GE Wins Korea Project: General Electric Co. has won a $400-million project to launch South Korea's first satellite, published reports said. Korean newspapers, quoting government sources, said the Korean government selected General Electric of Fairfield, Conn., over British Aerospace of Great Britain as the main manufacturer of a telecommunications satellite to be launched in 1995. A spokesman for GE Aerospace, the GE unit in Valley Forge, Penn.
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