Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSouth Korea Culture
IN THE NEWS

South Korea Culture

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
September 5, 1988 | Randy Harvey
The first Olympics I covered was in 1976 at Montreal, where the mascot was Amik, a meek sea lion. I don't remember him. I thought the mascot was Nadia Comaneci. Many people contend that Peter Ueberroth was the face of the Los Angeles Olympics to the rest of the world, but that is not the case. When is the last time you saw a Peter Ueberroth key chain? Sam the Eagle has his mug on mugs from Bangkok to Bucharest.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 7, 2002 | BARBARA DEMICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prancing on a chair in a fashionable cafe, an 11-month-old beagle wears a red patent-leather collar and a sweater in festive Christmas colors. Nobody seems bothered when she puts her paws on the cafe table or tries to lap at her owner's cappuccino. In fact, this cafe is designed especially for dog owners--the menu even includes dog food--and many of the clients say they wouldn't consider going out on weekends to any establishment that didn't welcome their pets.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 23, 1995 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jang Song Hyon is a master at swimming the treacherous seas of South Korean corruption. The business consultant knows that a $100 "transportation expense" to journalists will buy goodwill; a 10% "commission" to doctors will help sales of his firm's pharmaceutical products. He once paid a ministry official about $7,000 for a legal interpretation favorable to his U.S. client, although he generally counsels Americans to offer "scholarships" or gifts of office equipment instead to avoid violating U.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Lee Weon Ae, a 42-year-old schoolteacher, buys a new car in the next year or two to replace her Hyundai Sonata, she expects to look at another Hyundai or possibly a Kia. One thing's certain, though: She won't even glance at an import. "If I drove a foreign car, my friends would look at me like I was crazy," the mother of two said. "They'd think I was extravagant and living way beyond my means." Lee isn't alone. Even as the South Korean auto industry makes impressive gains in the U.S.
NEWS
June 23, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came around like clockwork, from the tax office and fire department, from licensing agencies and safety inspection bureaus, gathering for their regular feasts at Lee Il Ho's elegant restaurant. These officials weren't after just meals. They wanted money, in exchange for allowing his business to operate. Not much: $10 here, $20 there.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
Facing an unfamiliar and sometimes unbending banking system in the United States, thousands of Korean immigrants rely on an ancient Asian lending practice known as a kye to finance their prospering small businesses in Los Angeles and other cities. In a kye , a group of a dozen or more friends or associates get together monthly and each contributes the same amount, usually ranging from $100 to $50,000, to a common pot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1995 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Offended by reports that Los Angeles City Councilman Nate Holden was entertained by scantily clad women during an official trip to South Korea--and by Holden's contention that such behavior is a typical business practice there--Korean American community leaders are demanding a public apology from the veteran lawmaker and may launch a recall campaign against him.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ahn Hyang Shim, 28, and her husband were filled with expectation as they entered Jinju Kaya Jamo Hospital on the outskirts of Pusan for the birth of their first child. They were told Ahn would need a caesarean because she hadn't produced enough water, but the doctor quickly reassured them that this was routine. That was the last time Ahn's family saw her conscious. During the caesarean she fell into a coma, and she remains in a vegetative state more than nine months later.
TRAVEL
December 17, 2000 | KRISTIN L. JOHANNSEN, Kristin L. Johannsen is a freelance writer who lives in Berea, Ky
Behind this city's ultramodern facade, beyond the endless concrete walls and drab, boxy buildings that line the downtown streets, hides a unique, traditional culture where rare treasures like the kaleidoscope-painted palaces of Korean kings can be found. Seek them out and you'll find other surprises, like busy herbal medicine markets, colorful folk villages and tranquil teahouses.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Lee Weon Ae, a 42-year-old schoolteacher, buys a new car in the next year or two to replace her Hyundai Sonata, she expects to look at another Hyundai or possibly a Kia. One thing's certain, though: She won't even glance at an import. "If I drove a foreign car, my friends would look at me like I was crazy," the mother of two said. "They'd think I was extravagant and living way beyond my means." Lee isn't alone. Even as the South Korean auto industry makes impressive gains in the U.S.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ahn Hyang Shim, 28, and her husband were filled with expectation as they entered Jinju Kaya Jamo Hospital on the outskirts of Pusan for the birth of their first child. They were told Ahn would need a caesarean because she hadn't produced enough water, but the doctor quickly reassured them that this was routine. That was the last time Ahn's family saw her conscious. During the caesarean she fell into a coma, and she remains in a vegetative state more than nine months later.
TRAVEL
December 17, 2000 | KRISTIN L. JOHANNSEN, Kristin L. Johannsen is a freelance writer who lives in Berea, Ky
Behind this city's ultramodern facade, beyond the endless concrete walls and drab, boxy buildings that line the downtown streets, hides a unique, traditional culture where rare treasures like the kaleidoscope-painted palaces of Korean kings can be found. Seek them out and you'll find other surprises, like busy herbal medicine markets, colorful folk villages and tranquil teahouses.
NEWS
November 15, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Perhaps nowhere was the fervor of South Korean mothers for their children's education more evident than on a dark, frigid mountaintop overlooking this capital city on a recent morning. About 300 mothers of high school seniors had packed an open-air Buddhist temple Saturday evening to pray--all night--for their children's success in a national college-entrance exam today that will determine whether the students get into the country's top schools. Most had arrived by 8 p.m.
NEWS
April 2, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Swiri," a shoot-'em-up movie about a South Korean spy who falls in love with an enemy spy masquerading as a purveyor of exotic fish, is taking this nation by storm. Even South Korean intelligence agents are being dispatched to see the blockbuster, which in less than two months has broken the box office attendance record for any domestic film and is on target to overtake "Titanic" as the country's most popular movie ever.
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it comes to self-sacrifice, no detail is too small for the earnest citizens of this newly troubled country. Wedding halls have stopped serving the traditional wedding repast between 2 and 4 p.m. on the grounds that most guests, already full from lunch, were wasting the food. Apartment elevators are being programmed to stop only on alternate floors to save electricity. Average folks have tossed more than $135 million in gold trinkets into the national hat as a way to stoke foreign reserves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1997
Carson and Wan-ju Gun, South Korea, are going to become sister cities in a program that city officials say will expose residents to the Korean culture and its customs. The City Council recently approved the partnership set to begin with a ceremony in October. Carson already has a sister city relationship with Soka, Japan, and is seeking to expand its program.
NEWS
July 24, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
When South Korean authorities lifted restrictions on the sale of imported tobacco this month, some Koreans became two-pack smokers--puffing away at domestic cigarettes in public but keeping a pack of foreign cigarettes to inhale in private. The double life of tobacco addicts is one of the more peculiar manifestations of bubbling nationalism in South Korea. American brands are now widely available and nearly as cheap as the domestic competition. But smoking them is simply unpatriotic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1997
Carson and Wan-ju Gun, South Korea, are going to become sister cities in a program that city officials say will expose residents to the Korean culture and its customs. The City Council recently approved the partnership set to begin with a ceremony in October. Carson already has a sister city relationship with Soka, Japan, and is seeking to expand its program.
NEWS
May 13, 1996 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kim Mu Young, a Christian evangelist, hails from the mountainous Kyongsang region, famed for its rugged individualism rooted in a history of isolated farmers scratching a living from a harsh environment. But he works in the Chungchong area south of Seoul, renowned for refined manners and cautious ways that reflect a tradition of close links to dynastic rulers. "If you're a hotheaded person like me, you can barely live here because people are so tedious, so slow," he complained.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1995 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles City Councilman Nate Holden on Thursday apologized to the Korean community for "the terrible misunderstanding" over his being entertained by strippers during a city mission to South Korea--and his explanation of the controversial event--but continued to insist that he has done nothing wrong.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|