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NEWS
February 19, 1987 | From Reuters
The United States and South Korea will begin huge joint military maneuvers today despite protests from North Korea, which charges that the scheduled 10-week exercise is a preparation for war. About 200,000 American and South Korean troops will take part in Team Spirit 87, the latest edition of annual exercises first staged on the peninsula in 1976. The exercise is billed as the largest in the non-communist world. Units from U.S.
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WORLD
November 25, 2010 | By John M. Glionna and Ethan Kim, Los Angeles Times
South Korea's disgraced defense minister resigned Thursday amid growing criticism in the wake of a deadly North Korean artillery barrage, setting the stage for sweeping changes in the South Korean military establishment. Defense Minister Kim Tae-young's resignation came as lawmakers blasted the government of President Lee Myung-bak for its slow response to Pyongyang's attack on an island outpost Tuesday that killed four people and injured 20. Lee accepted the resignation just hours after promising to send more troops to the disputed maritime border between North and South.
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NEWS
November 23, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Sunday expressed a "debt of gratitude" to U.S. military personnel around the world for their role in deterring the development and use of weapons of mass destruction and stressed the need to remain "vigilant," particularly in the face of threats from Iraq and North Korea. Although he was speaking in South Korea, Clinton clearly had the ongoing tensions with Iraq on his mind. Just a little more than a week earlier, he gave the go-ahead for a massive airstrike against Iraq.
NEWS
March 20, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the world's more unusual war games, the South Korean military conducted exercises Friday aimed at repelling any North Koreans who might sail over the demilitarized zone undetected in hang gliders or hot air balloons. The training exercises, the first of their kind in South Korea, were conducted in Kumchon county, between Seoul and the demilitarized zone, using civilian gliding enthusiasts posing as North Korean infiltrators, a statement from the Ministry of Defense said.
NEWS
July 9, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first meeting between President Clinton and South Korean leader Kim Young Sam here Saturday, there will be ringing declarations of democratic commitment, lofty statements of economic cooperation and a firm commitment to mutual security under the shadow of the world's most isolated and dangerous Communist regime in North Korea. Both sides will salute their best bilateral relations in decades. South Korea has defused American criticism by significantly reducing a troubling trade surplus.
NEWS
June 16, 1988
The Senate voted $8.7 billion for construction at military bases in the United States and around the world and urged North Atlantic Treaty Organization allies and South Korea to assume a greater share of defense costs. The Senate cut military construction funds for Clark Air Base in the Philippines from the Administration's request of $33 million to $7 million and killed any additional housing due to the uncertainty over future base rights there.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Justice Department investigators looking into the legality of $7.75 million in foreign payments that Northrop made to South Koreans in 1984 are examining whether some Northrop officials may have eventually received some of the money, according to knowledgeable sources. In an apparently related development, the Internal Revenue Service has begun its own probe of Northrop's payments to the Koreans, apparently to determine whether American recipients of the funds properly reported the income.
NEWS
November 1, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
President Roh Tae Woo said Monday that the South Korean people, who once welcomed American troops, would now prefer "a lower U.S. military profile" in their country. But Roh told an interviewer that steps initiated by his government to alter the military arrangement here are aimed at improving "the Korean-American security relationship" to the "mutual benefit of both countries." And he made it clear that he is in no hurry to have these steps put into effect. Now being discussed with U.S.
NEWS
November 1, 1989 | Reuters
South Korea has agreed in principle to buy three more submarines from West Germany in the latter half of the 1990s, for a total of six, a Defense Ministry spokesman said Tuesday. Seoul is to take delivery of three West German 209-class submarines in 1991 at $200 million each under a 1987 agreement. It has now decided to order three more at $165 million each, the spokesman told reporters.
NEWS
November 19, 1991
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney goes to Seoul for three days of consultations starting Wednesday. The annual defense talks could bring major changes in both the level of U.S. troops stationed in South Korea and the command structure, traditionally dominated by Americans, under which U.S. and Korean troops would operate.
NEWS
November 23, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Sunday expressed a "debt of gratitude" to U.S. military personnel around the world for their role in deterring the development and use of weapons of mass destruction and stressed the need to remain "vigilant," particularly in the face of threats from Iraq and North Korea. Although he was speaking in South Korea, Clinton clearly had the ongoing tensions with Iraq on his mind. Just a little more than a week earlier, he gave the go-ahead for a massive airstrike against Iraq.
NEWS
April 12, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A meeting of top U.S. and South Korean defense officials went off smoothly this week, but just out of sight lurked an unsettling question: Has Seoul grown complacent about the immediate threat from North Korea and too worried about the power rivalry it sees ahead with Japan? While official conversations here between U.S. Defense Secretary William S. Cohen and his counterparts centered on what the 1.2-million-member North Korean army might do next, some U.S.
NEWS
September 22, 1996 | From Associated Press
South Korean troops killed two more North Korean agents in gun battles in mountainous terrain early today. Two South Korean soldiers hunting the infiltrators were also killed, the Defense Ministry said. The deaths brought to 20 the number of North Korean intruders killed or found dead since their submarine was discovered marooned off the east coast of South Korea last week.
NEWS
September 20, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A violent espionage drama between the two Koreas deepened Thursday as Southern forces killed a total of seven infiltrators from the enemy North and a captured spy confessed that his side had conducted intelligence operations on South Korean air defense systems. The casualties brought to 18 the number of North Koreans left dead after their submarine ran aground near the eastern city of Kangnung on Wednesday in what Seoul is calling Pyongyang's worst provocation in nearly 30 years.
NEWS
July 10, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Suspicion and fear of war returned to South Korea on Saturday as President Kim Young Sam put his nation's armed forces on alert immediately after hearing of the death of North Korean leader Kim Il Sung. Daily life in both Seoul and the North Korean capital, Pyongyang, remained normal, however, and officials of the United States, which maintains 37,000 troops in South Korea, said no signs of military movements had emerged and that American forces were not on alert.
NEWS
March 20, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, shaken by the acrimonious breakdown of nuclear disarmament talks between North and South Korea, on Saturday decided to pursue measures ranging from U.N.-imposed sanctions against the North to massive joint military maneuvers in the South.
NEWS
April 12, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A meeting of top U.S. and South Korean defense officials went off smoothly this week, but just out of sight lurked an unsettling question: Has Seoul grown complacent about the immediate threat from North Korea and too worried about the power rivalry it sees ahead with Japan? While official conversations here between U.S. Defense Secretary William S. Cohen and his counterparts centered on what the 1.2-million-member North Korean army might do next, some U.S.
NEWS
March 20, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, shaken by the acrimonious breakdown of nuclear disarmament talks between North and South Korea, on Saturday decided to pursue measures ranging from U.N.-imposed sanctions against the North to massive joint military maneuvers in the South.
NEWS
January 26, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is considering sending Patriot anti-missile batteries to South Korea to strengthen U.S. forces there and help discourage any possible attacks by North Korea, officials here said Tuesday. The move, which still requires a final decision by the President, was requested two weeks ago by Gen. Gary Luck, commander of U.S. forces in Korea, in the face of a continuing buildup of North Korean troops along the border.
NEWS
December 4, 1993 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As President Clinton tries to ease tensions with North Korea over its nuclear program, the Air Force's top general warned Friday that the United States and its allies would be hard-pressed to stop an invasion of South Korea. Gen. Merrill McPeak said that while the United States and South Korea could defeat the North Koreans in an air war, they might not be able to quickly turn back an invasion of Seoul by ground forces.
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