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South Korea Diplomatic Recognition Ussr

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June 5, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev held a brief but historic meeting with South Korean President Roh Tae Woo here Monday, and Roh later predicted that it will lead to diplomatic relations and wider economic cooperation--and perhaps eventually to reunification of the Korean Peninsula. "Now that German reunification is becoming a reality, Korea is the only nation on earth that still is divided by Cold War politics," Roh told a press conference after his hourlong talk with Gorbachev.
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NEWS
December 15, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korea and the Soviet Union, celebrating their establishment of diplomatic relations after years of animosity, pledged Friday to work together toward the eventual reunification of Korea and the reduction of tension in Asia. South Korean President Roh Tae Woo said that his country's new relationship with the Soviet Union, long the patron of rival North Korea, marked "the end of an era that brought about unspeakable trauma to mankind and the unnatural division of nations and peoples."
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NEWS
December 15, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korea and the Soviet Union, celebrating their establishment of diplomatic relations after years of animosity, pledged Friday to work together toward the eventual reunification of Korea and the reduction of tension in Asia. South Korean President Roh Tae Woo said that his country's new relationship with the Soviet Union, long the patron of rival North Korea, marked "the end of an era that brought about unspeakable trauma to mankind and the unnatural division of nations and peoples."
NEWS
October 1, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Soviet Union obliterated two of the remaining remnants of the diplomatic divisions of the Cold War on Sunday by establishing full diplomatic relations with South Korea and restoring consular ties with Israel. Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze hammered out the details of the agreements in back-to-back meetings with Israeli Foreign Minister David Levy and South Korean Foreign Minister Choi Ho Joong in the offices of the U.N. Security Council president.
NEWS
October 1, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Soviet Union obliterated two of the remaining remnants of the diplomatic divisions of the Cold War on Sunday by establishing full diplomatic relations with South Korea and restoring consular ties with Israel. Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze hammered out the details of the agreements in back-to-back meetings with Israeli Foreign Minister David Levy and South Korean Foreign Minister Choi Ho Joong in the offices of the U.N. Security Council president.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev held a brief but historic meeting with South Korean President Roh Tae Woo here Monday, and Roh later predicted that it will lead to diplomatic relations and wider economic cooperation--and perhaps eventually to reunification of the Korean Peninsula. "Now that German reunification is becoming a reality, Korea is the only nation on earth that still is divided by Cold War politics," Roh told a press conference after his hourlong talk with Gorbachev.
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