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South Korea Education

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NEWS
March 5, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Influential South Koreans whose children were born in the United States and thus hold American citizenship long have taken advantage of an admissions system here that gives foreigners preference in getting their sons and daughters into universities without taking an arduous entrance examination. But when it was discovered that President Kim Young Sam's new justice minister used this loophole for his daughter, the first of two "mini-scandals" for the new Kim administration erupted.
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NEWS
August 26, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since Japan approved a controversial right-wing textbook in March, the South Korean government has demanded revisions to the Japanese curriculum and stepped up long-standing accusations that Japan whitewashes the history taught in its schools. Seoul insists that Japan admit to its own students and the world that it subjugated East Asia, forced Korean women into prostitution and jailed and killed men who resisted Japan's 1910-45 colonization of the Korean peninsula.
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NEWS
August 26, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since Japan approved a controversial right-wing textbook in March, the South Korean government has demanded revisions to the Japanese curriculum and stepped up long-standing accusations that Japan whitewashes the history taught in its schools. Seoul insists that Japan admit to its own students and the world that it subjugated East Asia, forced Korean women into prostitution and jailed and killed men who resisted Japan's 1910-45 colonization of the Korean peninsula.
NEWS
November 15, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Perhaps nowhere was the fervor of South Korean mothers for their children's education more evident than on a dark, frigid mountaintop overlooking this capital city on a recent morning. About 300 mothers of high school seniors had packed an open-air Buddhist temple Saturday evening to pray--all night--for their children's success in a national college-entrance exam today that will determine whether the students get into the country's top schools. Most had arrived by 8 p.m.
NEWS
June 27, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
In a country purged of normal politics by an authoritarian government, national issues are often taken to the streets. Since the anti-government protests broke out June 10, student leaders have put more than 100,000 followers into street demonstrations. Word was passed on Seoul's more than 20 college campuses, and for Friday night's demonstrations leaflets were distributed downtown asking for support and designating assembly points.
NEWS
May 8, 1987
South Korean Prime Minister Lho Shin Yong ordered top police officials to keep a constant watch on campuses, set up guard posts at some college entrances and quickly intervene in anti-government protests. Lho met with national police officials after students battled police Wednesday in the provincial cities of Kwangju and Ansan. At least 30 people were injured in those clashes.
NEWS
January 24, 1992 | From Associated Press
South Korea has canceled its college entrance tests nationwide after a school guard stole the exam to help the daughter of a poor woman in his church. While such a theft may seem minor elsewhere in the world, the reaction Thursday in this fiercely competitive and educationally minded country has been swift: The education minister resigned, saying he was ultimately responsible for the transgression, then President Roh Tae Woo himself apologized.
NEWS
September 11, 1989
Warning of dire consequences for the nation's future, U.S. high school principals issued a "report card" giving American education a C-plus, compared with an A-minus for South Korea and West Germany's B-plus. The report differs from others that have found American young people lagging behind their foreign counterparts by examining not just student performance, but the overall commitment to education in the three societies, the National Assn. of Secondary School Principals said.
NEWS
February 1, 1989 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
The Educational Testing Service, in a six-country survey sure to bolster the harshest critics of American education, reported Tuesday that 13-year-old American schoolchildren score worse in mathematics than any of their counterparts and fall close to the bottom in science as well.
NEWS
November 15, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Perhaps nowhere was the fervor of South Korean mothers for their children's education more evident than on a dark, frigid mountaintop overlooking this capital city on a recent morning. About 300 mothers of high school seniors had packed an open-air Buddhist temple Saturday evening to pray--all night--for their children's success in a national college-entrance exam today that will determine whether the students get into the country's top schools. Most had arrived by 8 p.m.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Born and raised on an island where his father farmed, fished and gathered seaweed, Kim Young Kyu went to work at 15 as an unskilled construction worker. His parents couldn't afford to send him to high school. At work in Pusan, he heard of a vocational training institute that was operated with aid from then-West Germany. Tuition was free. "It was my last chance" to escape a life of poverty, Kim said. "Since I couldn't go to high school, I thought I at least had to obtain a skill."
NEWS
March 5, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Influential South Koreans whose children were born in the United States and thus hold American citizenship long have taken advantage of an admissions system here that gives foreigners preference in getting their sons and daughters into universities without taking an arduous entrance examination. But when it was discovered that President Kim Young Sam's new justice minister used this loophole for his daughter, the first of two "mini-scandals" for the new Kim administration erupted.
NEWS
January 24, 1992 | From Associated Press
South Korea has canceled its college entrance tests nationwide after a school guard stole the exam to help the daughter of a poor woman in his church. While such a theft may seem minor elsewhere in the world, the reaction Thursday in this fiercely competitive and educationally minded country has been swift: The education minister resigned, saying he was ultimately responsible for the transgression, then President Roh Tae Woo himself apologized.
NEWS
September 11, 1989
Warning of dire consequences for the nation's future, U.S. high school principals issued a "report card" giving American education a C-plus, compared with an A-minus for South Korea and West Germany's B-plus. The report differs from others that have found American young people lagging behind their foreign counterparts by examining not just student performance, but the overall commitment to education in the three societies, the National Assn. of Secondary School Principals said.
NEWS
February 1, 1989 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
The Educational Testing Service, in a six-country survey sure to bolster the harshest critics of American education, reported Tuesday that 13-year-old American schoolchildren score worse in mathematics than any of their counterparts and fall close to the bottom in science as well.
NEWS
September 2, 1987 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
The students of Seoul National University gathered Tuesday on the strategic heights above the entrance to their campus. Hurling stones and gasoline bombs at the police, the protesters chanted for the blood of their country's top leaders. "Execute Chun Doo Hwan and Roh Tae Woo," they cried, referring to South Korea's president and the head of its ruling party. "Topple the military dictatorship."
NEWS
September 2, 1987 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
The students of Seoul National University gathered Tuesday on the strategic heights above the entrance to their campus. Hurling stones and gasoline bombs at the police, the protesters chanted for the blood of their country's top leaders. "Execute Chun Doo Hwan and Roh Tae Woo," they cried, referring to South Korea's president and the head of its ruling party. "Topple the military dictatorship."
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Born and raised on an island where his father farmed, fished and gathered seaweed, Kim Young Kyu went to work at 15 as an unskilled construction worker. His parents couldn't afford to send him to high school. At work in Pusan, he heard of a vocational training institute that was operated with aid from then-West Germany. Tuition was free. "It was my last chance" to escape a life of poverty, Kim said. "Since I couldn't go to high school, I thought I at least had to obtain a skill."
NEWS
June 27, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
In a country purged of normal politics by an authoritarian government, national issues are often taken to the streets. Since the anti-government protests broke out June 10, student leaders have put more than 100,000 followers into street demonstrations. Word was passed on Seoul's more than 20 college campuses, and for Friday night's demonstrations leaflets were distributed downtown asking for support and designating assembly points.
NEWS
May 8, 1987
South Korean Prime Minister Lho Shin Yong ordered top police officials to keep a constant watch on campuses, set up guard posts at some college entrances and quickly intervene in anti-government protests. Lho met with national police officials after students battled police Wednesday in the provincial cities of Kwangju and Ansan. At least 30 people were injured in those clashes.
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