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South Korea Elections

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NEWS
December 18, 1987 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
The United States on Thursday cast aside challenges to the validity of South Korea's presidential elections, quickly serving notice that it considers ruling party candidate Roh Tae Woo to be the legitimate victor in Wednesday's voting. State Department spokesman Charles Redman told reporters that Roh "appears to be the winner by a substantial margin." He urged reconciliation among the competing parties and factions in South Korea. "We congratulate Mr.
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WORLD
December 19, 2012 | By Barbara Demick and Jung-yoon Choi, Los Angeles Times
SEOUL - Park Geun-hye, the daughter of the strongman who ruled South Korea for much of the 1960s and 1970s, was elected Wednesday as the country's first female president after a divisive, hotly contested election. Park, a member of the conservative New Frontier ruling party, has been a legislator since 1998. But her claim to fame before now came from her father, Park Chung-hee, who seized power in 1961 in a military coup and led the country until his assassination in 1979. Park, whose mother was killed in 1974, served as de facto first lady at state functions for the last five years of her father's presidency.
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NEWS
March 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A record low number of voters turned out for the first local elections in South Korea in 30 years. Returns showed that 55% of the 24 million eligible voters voted, compared with 89% in the 1987 presidential election. Officials blamed apathy and a campaign marred by scandal. The voting was for legislative councils in small cities, counties and municipal wards, the lowest level of the new system of local government. Results are to be announced today.
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Kim Dae Jung's party placed a distant second in key parliamentary elections as fed-up South Koreans tossed out incumbents and tainted politicians by the score, voted for regional favorites or stayed away from the polls in record numbers, according to unofficial results today.
NEWS
December 20, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After decades of watching television programs that often portrayed him as a dangerous radical or Communist sympathizer, South Koreans awoke Friday to find every station broadcasting slick profiles that glorified President-elect Kim Dae Jung. What a difference a day made for the much-vilified opposition leader, whose first promise was not to perpetuate the political retaliation from which he has so suffered.
NEWS
May 16, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the ruling party of President Roh Tae Woo, the third former general to rule South Korea, selects its candidate on Tuesday for a December presidential election, it will be choosing between two leaders, neither of whom rose above the rank of major in the army. The favorite is Kim Young Sam, 64. He spent 36 years in the opposition ranks before joining Roh two years ago to give Roh a majority in the National Assembly. His opponent is Lee Jong Chan, 56.
NEWS
July 18, 1987 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Opposition leader Kim Dae Jung moved closer Friday to announcing his presidential candidacy, after securing the support of 30 national legislators who endorsed him to run against President Chun Doo Hwan's ruling party candidate in elections expected later this year.
NEWS
June 25, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Former South Korean Prime Minister Kim Jong Pil won his opposition party's nomination to run for president, vowing to eliminate corruption by introducing a parliamentary government system. Kim, 71, head of the conservative United Liberal Democrats, joins Kim Dae Jung, 72, leader of the main opposition National Congress for New Politics, in the presidential race. The ruling New Korea Party, battered by recent scandal, has yet to select its nominee for the December vote.
NEWS
April 8, 1996 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three legislators are seeking reelection from jail--and might win. Some college youths drumming up enthusiasm for President Kim Young Sam's ruling party are dancing in the streets; others are throwing firebombs to bring the government down--but aiming carefully, so as not to hurt anyone. Then there is the opposition advertisement decrying high prices--starring "speechless" anchovies so proud of their value that they just don't know what to say.
NEWS
August 14, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two sons of the preeminent South Korean presidential candidate stand accused of dodging the draft, and the political fallout could trigger the defeat of the ruling party for the first time since 1961, political analysts said Wednesday. Lee Hoi Chang, a former Supreme Court justice, won the New Korea Party's presidential nomination last month, primarily because of his reputation as "Mr. Clean."
NEWS
April 11, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although he is planning a historic summit with North Korea and his economic reforms are popular in the West, South Korean President Kim Dae Jung is in danger of becoming a lame duck with nearly three years left in his term. Facing voters fed up with corruption, party infighting and political gridlock, Kim's party may fail to muster a majority in parliament in elections Thursday.
NEWS
December 20, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After decades of watching television programs that often portrayed him as a dangerous radical or Communist sympathizer, South Koreans awoke Friday to find every station broadcasting slick profiles that glorified President-elect Kim Dae Jung. What a difference a day made for the much-vilified opposition leader, whose first promise was not to perpetuate the political retaliation from which he has so suffered.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1997 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as South Korea's president-elect today declared the launch of a "new age" of economic reform for the debt-racked nation, its financial markets suggested investor confidence remains in short supply. The benchmark Kospi stock index was off 3.5% to 403.78 in afternoon trading today, as the country's currency, the won, sank to 1,615 to the dollar from Wednesday's 1,481. Markets had been closed Thursday for the election.
NEWS
December 19, 1997 | SONNI EFRON and DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Former dissident Kim Dae Jung claimed a historic victory today in South Korea's presidential election as voters dumped the party that has ruled them for decades for a fiery opposition leader who has promised to extricate them from the country's worst economic crisis since the Korean War. With voter turnout at near-record highs and voters in their 20s and 30s supporting him by huge margins, the 73-year-old Kim carried 40.3% of the vote to 38.
NEWS
December 18, 1997 | SONNI EFRON and DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
If undecided voters wake up this morning angry about their imploding economy and determined to "throw the bums out," the next president of South Korea will be fiery former dissident Kim Dae Jung. But if they feel afraid, nostalgic or worried about financial stability, the winner will almost certainly be former Supreme Court Justice Lee Hoi Chang. Lee is the favored candidate of many older and upper-income voters, big business and the financial markets.
NEWS
October 15, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has survived four decades in the political wilderness, three assassination attempts, one kidnapping, one death sentence, six years in prison, 10 years under house arrest or in exile, and the enmity of four South Korean leaders. Now Kim Dae Jung appears poised to become South Korea's next president.
NEWS
December 18, 1997 | SONNI EFRON and DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
If undecided voters wake up this morning angry about their imploding economy and determined to "throw the bums out," the next president of South Korea will be fiery former dissident Kim Dae Jung. But if they feel afraid, nostalgic or worried about financial stability, the winner will almost certainly be former Supreme Court Justice Lee Hoi Chang. Lee is the favored candidate of many older and upper-income voters, big business and the financial markets.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1997 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as South Korea's president-elect today declared the launch of a "new age" of economic reform for the debt-racked nation, its financial markets suggested investor confidence remains in short supply. The benchmark Kospi stock index was off 3.5% to 403.78 in afternoon trading today, as the country's currency, the won, sank to 1,615 to the dollar from Wednesday's 1,481. Markets had been closed Thursday for the election.
NEWS
August 14, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two sons of the preeminent South Korean presidential candidate stand accused of dodging the draft, and the political fallout could trigger the defeat of the ruling party for the first time since 1961, political analysts said Wednesday. Lee Hoi Chang, a former Supreme Court justice, won the New Korea Party's presidential nomination last month, primarily because of his reputation as "Mr. Clean."
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