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NEWS
July 4, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
The downing of an Iranian airliner over the Persian Gulf on Sunday brought to mind the incident five years ago in which the Soviet Union shot down an unarmed Korean airliner, killing all 269 aboard. In both incidents, Washington and Moscow insisted they had acted properly in self-defense and both insisted that the doomed planes ignored warning signals and were out of their assigned air corridors. But in contrast to the hours of Soviet tracking of the Korean Air Flight 007 on Sept.
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BUSINESS
September 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Aid Package for Soviets Will Proceed: With the coup in the Soviet Union ending in failure, the Seoul government and South Korean banks said they will proceed with plans for providing financial assistance to Moscow. The Koreans had promised Moscow a $3-billion aid package earlier this year. A syndicate of 10 Korean banks plans to provide one assistance installment--a $550-million cash loan--later this month.
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NEWS
June 4, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today, on the final day of his American tour, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev will make one last grand move on the global chessboard by meeting here with the president of South Korea, Roh Tae Woo. Both the economic and political aspects of the meeting with Roh could be of crucial importance to the two countries involved. For the Bush Administration, which helped arrange the meeting, better relations between the Soviets and the South Koreans could offer several major advantages.
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | From Associated Press
Mikhail S. Gorbachev succeeded in South Korea where he failed in Japan, winning agreements Saturday for economic cooperation and joint development of Soviet natural resources. The Soviet leader also got President Roh Tae Woo to agree to study the possibility of a friendship treaty between the Soviet Union and South Korea, and Gorbachev promised to help efforts to reduce tensions on the divided Korean Peninsula.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hailing this week's "historic meeting" between the presidents of South Korea and the Soviet Union, the White House called Wednesday for similar steps between the two Koreas as President Bush conferred with South Korean President Roh Tae Woo. Roh, speaking to reporters afterward, said that he and Bush agreed that the two nations on the divided Korean Peninsula "have to cooperate so that we can melt down the ice which still exists from the Cold War years."
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | From United Press International
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo arrived in Moscow on Thursday, the first South Korean head of state to visit the Soviet Union. Roh, accompanied by his wife and a 15-person entourage that included Foreign Minister Choi Ho Joong, landed in the Soviet capital Thursday afternoon and had an evening meeting with President Mikhail S. Gorbachev. Roh has said he will try to secure Gorbachev's help in ending the Cold War confrontation between North and South Korea.
BUSINESS
September 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Aid Package for Soviets Will Proceed: With the coup in the Soviet Union ending in failure, the Seoul government and South Korean banks said they will proceed with plans for providing financial assistance to Moscow. The Koreans had promised Moscow a $3-billion aid package earlier this year. A syndicate of 10 Korean banks plans to provide one assistance installment--a $550-million cash loan--later this month.
NEWS
September 9, 1988
The Soviet Union will allow South Korean airliners to fly through its airspace for three weeks to cut travel time for European athletes taking part in the Olympic Games in Seoul, a South Korean spokesman said. Korean Air, the national airline, will be able to use Soviet airspace from Monday to Oct. 4, reducing flight times by as much as 4 1/2 hours. The Games run from Sept. 17 to Oct. 2. The Soviet Union and South Korea have no formal diplomatic relations.
NEWS
January 6, 1987 | From Reuters
The government will try to improve relations with China, the Soviet Union and East Bloc countries to avoid any Communist-led boycott of the 1988 Seoul Olympics, Foreign Ministry officials said Monday. They said the ministry hopes to maintain peace on the divided Korean Peninsula this year and ensure "substantive progress" in efforts to improve ties with Communist states before the games.
SPORTS
October 12, 1987
Kim Chong-ha, president of the (South) Korea National Olympic Committee, said Sunday the Soviet Union and other East European nations have promised to attend the 1988 Seoul Olympics. Kim made the statement upon arriving in Seoul from Sofia, Bulgaria, where he attended a two-day meeting of the 34-member Assn. of European National Olympic Committees (AENOC).
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Soviet Union and South Korea agreed today to broad new economic cooperation and a joint multibillion-dollar natural gas development project in the Soviet Far East, state-run KBS television reported. The Soviet Union also reaffirmed its position that if North Korea refuses to sign the nuclear safeguard treaty it will suspend supplies of nuclear fuel, technology and other help to its longtime Communist ally, KBS said.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese officials suggested Friday that Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's visit here had opened the door to some economic aid from Japan, and Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu declared that he wants to visit the Soviet Union as soon as possible. Diplomats said the trip might be made in August or September after an advance visit to Moscow by Foreign Minister Taro Nakayama following the London economic summit of seven advanced industrialized democracies July 15-17.
NEWS
January 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's special envoy, Igor Rogachev, arrived in Seoul and said Moscow is willing to act as peacemaker between bitter enemies North and South Korea. Rogachev, the highest-ranking Soviet Foreign Ministry official to visit Seoul, said he hopes the two Koreas will continue peaceful discussions.
NEWS
December 15, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korea and the Soviet Union, celebrating their establishment of diplomatic relations after years of animosity, pledged Friday to work together toward the eventual reunification of Korea and the reduction of tension in Asia. South Korean President Roh Tae Woo said that his country's new relationship with the Soviet Union, long the patron of rival North Korea, marked "the end of an era that brought about unspeakable trauma to mankind and the unnatural division of nations and peoples."
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | From United Press International
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo arrived in Moscow on Thursday, the first South Korean head of state to visit the Soviet Union. Roh, accompanied by his wife and a 15-person entourage that included Foreign Minister Choi Ho Joong, landed in the Soviet capital Thursday afternoon and had an evening meeting with President Mikhail S. Gorbachev. Roh has said he will try to secure Gorbachev's help in ending the Cold War confrontation between North and South Korea.
NEWS
October 1, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Soviet Union obliterated two of the remaining remnants of the diplomatic divisions of the Cold War on Sunday by establishing full diplomatic relations with South Korea and restoring consular ties with Israel. Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze hammered out the details of the agreements in back-to-back meetings with Israeli Foreign Minister David Levy and South Korean Foreign Minister Choi Ho Joong in the offices of the U.N. Security Council president.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev held a brief but historic meeting with South Korean President Roh Tae Woo here Monday, and Roh later predicted that it will lead to diplomatic relations and wider economic cooperation--and perhaps eventually to reunification of the Korean Peninsula. "Now that German reunification is becoming a reality, Korea is the only nation on earth that still is divided by Cold War politics," Roh told a press conference after his hourlong talk with Gorbachev.
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
North Korea's state news agency carried a blistering attack on Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev for his "unpardonable, traitorous bargaining" with the leader of hated South Korea. The Soviet leader met with South Korean President Roh Tae Woo on Monday in San Francisco, during which they agreed to move toward diplomatic ties. The report denounced Roh's "flunkyist, submissive and traitorous trip which has the existence of (South Korea) and the future destiny of the country in danger."
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hailing this week's "historic meeting" between the presidents of South Korea and the Soviet Union, the White House called Wednesday for similar steps between the two Koreas as President Bush conferred with South Korean President Roh Tae Woo. Roh, speaking to reporters afterward, said that he and Bush agreed that the two nations on the divided Korean Peninsula "have to cooperate so that we can melt down the ice which still exists from the Cold War years."
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