Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSouth Korea Government
IN THE NEWS

South Korea Government

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 14, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When former opposition leader Kim Young Sam was campaigning for president as the governing party's candidate, he spoke of "reform within stability." To many South Koreans, the slogan did not sound very dramatic. But only two weeks into office, the new president has let barely a day go by without announcing some new change.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 9, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
About 4,500 doctors walked off their jobs for a second straight day, accusing the South Korean government of trying to force small clinics out of business. The doctors, all in medical residencies, launched their walkout to protest a government plan to ban pharmacists from prescribing medicine and doctors from selling it. The roles of physicians and pharmacists are not clearly divided in South Korea.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 1, 1998 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the window of his small Westside apartment, Bong Koo Cho can gaze out at the ocean, but only in his mind's eye can he look across to the life and land he left more than a decade ago. Then, Cho was one of South Korea's wealthiest businessmen, the owner of Samho, one of the nation's biggest conglomerates, and the head of a sprawling estate in the heart of Seoul. Chauffeurs drove him around. Maids waited on his wife. But in 1984, his world was overturned.
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Medical services were gridlocked in South Korea as thousands of doctors rallied against a government plan to block physicians from selling medicine--and deprive many of them of their biggest source of income. About 80% of the nation's 18,000 clinics shut down as a result of the protest. All major hospitals remained open but were overwhelmed by a rush of patients.
NEWS
September 15, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For North Korea and South Korea, ripped apart after World War II by occupation forces, the goal of reunification has become a kind of holy grail.
NEWS
November 5, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At one of his regular meetings with the chief executives of South Korea's largest conglomerates in the early 1980s, President Chun Doo Hwan pulled aside the chairman of the Kukje Group. Patting Yang Chung Mo on the back, Chun pointed to a steel company magnate and told Yang that the steel executive had donated $2.6 million to one of the personal charities of the president's wife. "An ordinary businessman would have taken that statement as a warning that he too ought to donate $2.
NEWS
June 23, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came around like clockwork, from the tax office and fire department, from licensing agencies and safety inspection bureaus, gathering for their regular feasts at Lee Il Ho's elegant restaurant. These officials weren't after just meals. They wanted money, in exchange for allowing his business to operate. Not much: $10 here, $20 there.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1999 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's Saturday afternoon and, after a full 5 1/2 days of work, the staffs at Commercial Bank of Korea and Hanil Bank slip into wool jackets, knickers and hiking boots. A chance to relax, forget the bad loans, shed the economic gloom and doom? Not exactly. It's time to head for the hills.
NEWS
July 7, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former South Korean President Kim Young Sam once called corruption "the Korean disease." Now his successor, reformer Kim Dae Jung, is facing a series of explosive scandals and finding it as hard as ever to eradicate the long-bemoaned, entrenched culture of influence peddling, cronyism and payola.
NEWS
April 29, 1987
Students fought police on campuses across South Korea, and hundreds of Protestant and Roman Catholic clergy joined in fasts and protests of President Chun Doo Hwan's refusal to consider constitutional reform. Officials said 4,000 students conducted rallies at 18 universities in Seoul and elsewhere and that most ended in clashes with riot police. Chun announced April 13 that all debate on constitutional change will be halted until after next year's Summer Olympics.
NEWS
January 23, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A South Korean civic organization's blacklist of 164 candidates in April elections has spurred a legal and political showdown that analysts say could fundamentally alter the face of this country's young democracy. When U.S. nonprofit groups cite candidates they dislike, few take notice. But a citizens movement launched here this month to expand voter oversight, fight corruption and, in effect, "throw the bums out" has rudely awakened the cozy world of South Korean politics.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Ford Motor Co. said on Wednesday that it is interested in buying Daewoo Motor Co., prompting the South Korean government to solicit bids for its No. 2 auto maker rather than negotiate exclusively with General Motors Corp. Ford will send its top Asia executive, Paul Drenkow, back to Seoul to talk with holders of Daewoo Motor's bonds and loans in early January, a month after he began talks with the creditors. Daewoo has more than $16 billion in debt.
NEWS
August 3, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Shortages of food, water and blankets slowed efforts to help thousands of people left homeless by deadly flooding in South Korea. Victims accused the government of being poorly prepared for the disaster. Three days of torrential rains have left at least 20 dead and 24 missing. Another powerful storm approached the Korean peninsula from the South Pacific.
NEWS
July 7, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former South Korean President Kim Young Sam once called corruption "the Korean disease." Now his successor, reformer Kim Dae Jung, is facing a series of explosive scandals and finding it as hard as ever to eradicate the long-bemoaned, entrenched culture of influence peddling, cronyism and payola.
NEWS
June 27, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
North and South Korea resumed their first governmental talks in more than a year Saturday after four days of false starts and postponements by the Pyongyang regime. Straining already tense talks, North Korea said Saturday that Seoul will have to apologize for a naval skirmish in the Yellow Sea before the North will carry out any agreements from their negotiations.
NEWS
March 6, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korea, which pioneered inter-country adoption after the Korean War nearly half a century ago, has been dramatically cutting back the number of children it sends overseas each year. Adoptions have dropped from a peak of more than 8,000 in 1986 to about 1,800 in 1998, and the government wants to phase them out entirely. South Korea, once the No. 1 source of foreign-born children adopted by American families, has sunk to a distant third, behind Russia and China.
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Although the United States believes that South Korea's political system "doesn't seem to be working," American diplomats "cannot play a brokerage role" in pursuing reform, an American official said Thursday. "Legitimacy, effectiveness and fairness" in government are the key issues between the ruling party and the opposition, the official, who insisted that he not be further identified, said in an interview.
NEWS
April 14, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER and SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writers
Former President Chun Doo Hwan, expressing regret over a scandal involving his younger brother, severed his last official links to power Wednesday, less than two weeks before a crucial electoral test of South Korea's fledgling democracy.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1999 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's Saturday afternoon and, after a full 5 1/2 days of work, the staffs at Commercial Bank of Korea and Hanil Bank slip into wool jackets, knickers and hiking boots. A chance to relax, forget the bad loans, shed the economic gloom and doom? Not exactly. It's time to head for the hills.
SPORTS
December 16, 1998 | RANDY HARVEY
Peter Ueberroth, president of the Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee, alleged in his 1985 autobiography that bidders from Seoul for the subsequent Summer Games gave two round-trip, first-class airline tickets to each International Olympic Committee member. "The tickets were easily redeemed for cash; many were," Ueberroth wrote.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|