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South Korea Government Officials

NEWS
January 23, 1990 | From Reuters
President Roh Tae Woo on Monday announced the formation of a huge ruling party that political analysts say will virtually secure one-party rule in South Korea. Roh, flanked by opposition leaders Kim Young Sam and Kim Jong Pil, told reporters that the ruling Democratic Justice Party has agreed to merge with two of the nation's three opposition parties.
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NEWS
September 23, 1990 | From Reuters
Thousands of protesters angry at South Korean government moves to relax curbs on farm imports fought with riot police in Seoul on Saturday when they were prevented from demonstrating, witnesses said. A police spokesman in Seoul said 1,665 farmers, students and dissidents were detained, but that most of them would be released with warnings. A police van was set afire during the clash, but there were no reports of serious injuries.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1990 | From Associated Press
President Roh Tae Woo called an emergency meeting of his economic ministers Monday after a record plunge in the South Korean stock market and another day of labor unrest. The composite stock index hit an 18-month low after falling 31.71 to close at 688.66, its lowest level since Oct. 13, 1988. The index has lost 24% this year. Protests by investors crippled operations at stock trading offices in Seoul and at least six other cities.
NEWS
June 23, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of the fourth anniversary of his promise to "democratize" South Korea, President Roh Tae Woo recognizes that widespread reforms he has carried out still have not won much popularity for him or his ruling party. In an interview with The Times, Roh blamed "the outmoded way of thinking of politicians," in general, and the factional feuding within his own Democratic Liberal Party, in particular, for the low ratings that all political parties, his own included, get in opinion polls.
NEWS
February 22, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A land development scandal that already has resulted in the arrest of five lawmakers, a major industrialist and a personal secretary to President Roh Tae Woo, could prove damaging to South Korea's still fragile institutions of democracy. Roh replaced two Cabinet ministers and the mayor of Seoul on Monday to signal a crackdown on corruption. On Tuesday, he reshuffled key posts in the ruling party and appeared on national television to renew his "firm resolution to become a clean president."
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chang Byong Jo, 52, a former aide to President Roh Tae Woo, and two legislators were jailed for up to six years for their part in a multimillion-dollar housing scandal. Six other people, including three members of Parliament and the head of a building firm, were convicted of bribery or influence-peddling in connection with the scandal. But the judge suspended their sentences.
NEWS
May 27, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo, in a move affirming that he intends to deal sternly with anti-government protests, shuffled his Cabinet on Sunday, making only four changes and including the appointment of yet another law-and-order man. As justice minister, Roh named former Prosecutor General Kim Ki Choon, 51. He also named a retired general, Ahn Pil Joon, 59, president of Korea Coal Co., to be health and social affairs minister.
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