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NEWS
September 9, 1990 | United Press International
More than 3,000 students and dissidents staged an anti-government rally and clashed with riot squads in Korea's second-largest city Saturday, police said. About 3,000 people were gathered on the Pusan University campus in Pusan, 205 miles southeast of Seoul, for the rally held to oppose the ruling Democratic Liberal Party which controls the National Assembly. Students began hurling firebombs and rocks at police who countered with tear gas to put down the disturbance, police said.
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NEWS
June 21, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite a surprisingly low voter turnout and an unexpectedly strong showing by candidates without party affiliation, President Roh Tae Woo's ruling party won a landslide victory in South Korea's first provincial and city elections in 30 years, returns disclosed today. Roh's Democratic Liberal Party won majorities in 12 of the 15 legislative bodies being elected, including a historic victory here in the capital.
NEWS
June 23, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of the fourth anniversary of his promise to "democratize" South Korea, President Roh Tae Woo recognizes that widespread reforms he has carried out still have not won much popularity for him or his ruling party. In an interview with The Times, Roh blamed "the outmoded way of thinking of politicians," in general, and the factional feuding within his own Democratic Liberal Party, in particular, for the low ratings that all political parties, his own included, get in opinion polls.
NEWS
February 22, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A land development scandal that already has resulted in the arrest of five lawmakers, a major industrialist and a personal secretary to President Roh Tae Woo, could prove damaging to South Korea's still fragile institutions of democracy. Roh replaced two Cabinet ministers and the mayor of Seoul on Monday to signal a crackdown on corruption. On Tuesday, he reshuffled key posts in the ruling party and appeared on national television to renew his "firm resolution to become a clean president."
NEWS
May 19, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fatal police clubbing of Kang Kyung Dae, a 20-year-old Myungji University freshman, not only launched the most enduring street protests in South Korea in four years. It also served to bring to the surface some of the deep disagreements that South Koreans have with President Roh Tae Woo's government. It has shown that South Koreans still have problems with their new-found, still-incomplete democracy. How the current political unrest will be resolved remains unclear.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo met with his top advisers as the country's unrest showed no sign of abating. News reports said a Cabinet shake-up and a release of political prisoners were imminent. Anti-government rallies have spread to more than 75 cities.
NEWS
May 27, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo, in a move affirming that he intends to deal sternly with anti-government protests, shuffled his Cabinet on Sunday, making only four changes and including the appointment of yet another law-and-order man. As justice minister, Roh named former Prosecutor General Kim Ki Choon, 51. He also named a retired general, Ahn Pil Joon, 59, president of Korea Coal Co., to be health and social affairs minister.
NEWS
May 14, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to expand more than two weeks of protests, students and dissidents gathered here today to pay homage to their dead and reiterate their political demands for the ouster of President Roh Tae Woo.
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Students and dissidents who threatened to renew a funeral procession for a student clubbed to death by police backed down and postponed indefinitely their plans to march with the body to Seoul City Hall. Police had blocked the procession by about 50,000 protesters demanding the ouster of President Roh Tae Woo. Roh also came under criticism from members of his own ruling party.
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