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NEWS
April 3, 2000 | Times Wire Services
South Korea's government-run quarantine service said Sunday that tests confirmed that cattle and pigs near the village of Paju were infected with foot-and-mouth disease, dealing a heavy blow to livestock farmers. Symptoms of the highly communicable viral disease began showing up last month in Paju, 30 miles north of Seoul, and then Hongsong, 65 miles southwest of the capital, where officials are still conducting tests.
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NEWS
April 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Foot-and-mouth disease was spreading farther from western to central South Korea despite government efforts to contain the deadly epidemic, quarantine officials said. "We are doing everything we can do, but the disease seems to be spreading. We are very concerned about it," said Jin Young Hwa, a spokesman for the National Veterinary Quarantine and Research Service. Jin said six more cattle at a farm in Chungju, about 60 miles southeast of the capital, Seoul, were found to have the disease.
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NEWS
August 30, 1987 | From Reuters
This country has decided to drop plans to demand AIDS tests of foreign job-seekers, South Korean officials announced Saturday. "The government has concluded that it is unrealistic, after all, to ask for AIDS-free certificates and no countries require them at present," one official said. Last month, the ministry denied reports that it would demand that overseas visitors to the 1988 Seoul Olympics carry certificates showing they are not infected with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
NEWS
April 3, 2000 | Times Wire Services
South Korea's government-run quarantine service said Sunday that tests confirmed that cattle and pigs near the village of Paju were infected with foot-and-mouth disease, dealing a heavy blow to livestock farmers. Symptoms of the highly communicable viral disease began showing up last month in Paju, 30 miles north of Seoul, and then Hongsong, 65 miles southwest of the capital, where officials are still conducting tests.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kim Jae Ok, secretary-general of the Citizens Alliance for Consumer Protection, insists that a South Korean government laboratory was pressured into backing off on its finding that imported American grapefruit contained Alar, a chemical with a potential for causing cancer. Lined up against her are the Agricultural Chemical Research Institute, which examined the grapefruit, the Korean National Health Institute, the U.S. government, American producers and Korean grapefruit importers.
NEWS
April 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Foot-and-mouth disease was spreading farther from western to central South Korea despite government efforts to contain the deadly epidemic, quarantine officials said. "We are doing everything we can do, but the disease seems to be spreading. We are very concerned about it," said Jin Young Hwa, a spokesman for the National Veterinary Quarantine and Research Service. Jin said six more cattle at a farm in Chungju, about 60 miles southeast of the capital, Seoul, were found to have the disease.
NEWS
November 14, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
South Korea's health minister resigned in the second bribery scandal to rock the Cabinet and embarrass President Kim Young Sam in less than a month. Lee Sung Ho quit amid reports in the state media that his wife had accepted a $193,000 payment from a trade association. Kim appointed Sohn Hak Kyu, a member of parliament for the ruling New Korea Party, as his new health chief.
WORLD
March 21, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The scientist who stunned the medical world with claims that he had created the first cloned human embryos and extracted stem cells from them -- research later found to have been faked -- was fired Monday by South Korea's most prestigious university. Seoul National University decided to dismiss Hwang Woo-suk after a disciplinary meeting, saying he and his co-workers caused the school to lose honor.
NEWS
June 13, 1998 | DARRYL FEARS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Kim Dae Jung came to Los Angeles on Friday as part of a nine-day U.S. visit, speaking at three events to groups of local political leaders and Korean businesspeople in an effort to rally support for his country's ailing economy. At a dinner hosted by Mayor Richard Riordan at Getty House, the mayor's official residence, Kim said he believes that the economic health of South Korea affects the fiscal well-being of Los Angeles.
NEWS
October 17, 1999 | LIBBY COPELAND, WASHINGTON POST
Will Dantzler, 45, has two memories of Seoul. Here is one: At about 4 years old, he's running wild with a band of fellow street kids in the impoverished aftermath of the Korean War. They are always hungry, surviving on food stolen from shops. "One would distract, and the rest of us would try to scoop whatever we could off the lowest-lying shelves," Dantzler said. "And I remember getting caught and being hastened out the door with a broom."
BUSINESS
December 4, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kim Jae Ok, secretary-general of the Citizens Alliance for Consumer Protection, insists that a South Korean government laboratory was pressured into backing off on its finding that imported American grapefruit contained Alar, a chemical with a potential for causing cancer. Lined up against her are the Agricultural Chemical Research Institute, which examined the grapefruit, the Korean National Health Institute, the U.S. government, American producers and Korean grapefruit importers.
NEWS
August 30, 1987 | From Reuters
This country has decided to drop plans to demand AIDS tests of foreign job-seekers, South Korean officials announced Saturday. "The government has concluded that it is unrealistic, after all, to ask for AIDS-free certificates and no countries require them at present," one official said. Last month, the ministry denied reports that it would demand that overseas visitors to the 1988 Seoul Olympics carry certificates showing they are not infected with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ahn Hyang Shim, 28, and her husband were filled with expectation as they entered Jinju Kaya Jamo Hospital on the outskirts of Pusan for the birth of their first child. They were told Ahn would need a caesarean because she hadn't produced enough water, but the doctor quickly reassured them that this was routine. That was the last time Ahn's family saw her conscious. During the caesarean she fell into a coma, and she remains in a vegetative state more than nine months later.
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