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August 23, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
The opportunity to speak with Sohn Kee Chung is the opportunity to hear a lesson in 20th-Century Korean history, and that is what he gave as he entertained guests at his modern sixth-floor apartment in a middle-class part of the city. Outside, although it was Saturday morning, children who were dressed in uniforms walked with various degrees of enthusiasm toward school for a half-day of studies, and street vendors sold Heinz ketchup, Smuckers jam, Velveeta cheese and other U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1990 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wanjoo Hyun introduces himself as a survivor. "I was in the first grade when the war began," Hyun, the 47-year-old owner of a restaurant in Orange, said last week as he visited an exhibit on the Korean War at the Korean Cultural Service in Los Angeles. "Even though I was very young, I remember most things about the war," he said, recounting how fighting took the lives of family members and reduced Seoul, his hometown, to rubble.
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NEWS
May 24, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo arrived here today for a controversial state visit that is arousing intense emotions in both Japan and South Korea over the bitter historical legacy shared by the Asian neighbors. Roh set the tone of his three-day visit on May 14 when he told Japanese reporters in Seoul that he hopes Emperor Akihito will make a clear-cut apology to South Koreans for Japan's 1910-1945 colonization of the Korean Peninsula.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo arrived here today for a controversial state visit that is arousing intense emotions in both Japan and South Korea over the bitter historical legacy shared by the Asian neighbors. Roh set the tone of his three-day visit on May 14 when he told Japanese reporters in Seoul that he hopes Emperor Akihito will make a clear-cut apology to South Koreans for Japan's 1910-1945 colonization of the Korean Peninsula.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1990 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wanjoo Hyun introduces himself as a survivor. "I was in the first grade when the war began," Hyun, the 47-year-old owner of a restaurant in Orange, said last week as he visited an exhibit on the Korean War at the Korean Cultural Service in Los Angeles. "Even though I was very young, I remember most things about the war," he said, recounting how fighting took the lives of family members and reduced Seoul, his hometown, to rubble.
NEWS
November 3, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Near the end of a hard dirt road, in a depression among the rice paddies, lies Kwangju City Cemetery. A sign, written in Korean and English, identifies a knoll covered with simple black headstones. "This is Graveyard III," the sign says. "This place has become an eternal sacred land where 101 of thousands of democratic patriots lie buried. They were bitterly slain with the military dictator's firearms."
NEWS
December 18, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Every year, thousands of Japanese tourists visit this small, dusty city in the countryside to view artifacts in a rather nondescript museum and hike up a piney hill where the last of the great Paekche kings was subjugated in AD 660. A Waikiki or a Disneyland it is not, but for Japanese archeology buffs, this ancient capital in western South Korea reminds them, eerily, of home.
NEWS
November 12, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six-hour traffic jams, nine-hour lines, five-deep crowds at crap tables and a mad dash for slot machines. Gambling fever has hit South Korea in a big way with the arrival of the nation's first casino for locals. "This is phenomenal, unbelievable," said Lee In Sung, manager of the new Kangwon Land Casino Hotel, which opened Oct. 29 here in Kangwon province. "I'm just delighted. We're breaking every record in the book."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1986
Once again, as so often in the last 40 years, the forces of political moderation in South Korea are in danger of being overwhelmed by the forces of extremism. A parliamentary committee that was to propose constitutional changes in advance of the 1988 elections has deadlocked, and the air is filled with mutual accusations of bad faith and deliberate obstructionism. Compromise, that salvation of democratic politics, seems beyond reach.
NEWS
August 6, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Roh Tae Woo was elected Wednesday as president of the ruling Democratic Justice Party, and he promised to "democratize" the party and carry out the "most free and fair election" in South Korea's history to choose the nation's next president. Roh, the party's candidate, told an audience of 1,400 party officials that "the people want the Democratic Justice Party to change" and promised to make the party "an arena for discussion and decision."
NEWS
December 18, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Every year, thousands of Japanese tourists visit this small, dusty city in the countryside to view artifacts in a rather nondescript museum and hike up a piney hill where the last of the great Paekche kings was subjugated in AD 660. A Waikiki or a Disneyland it is not, but for Japanese archeology buffs, this ancient capital in western South Korea reminds them, eerily, of home.
SPORTS
August 23, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
The opportunity to speak with Sohn Kee Chung is the opportunity to hear a lesson in 20th-Century Korean history, and that is what he gave as he entertained guests at his modern sixth-floor apartment in a middle-class part of the city. Outside, although it was Saturday morning, children who were dressed in uniforms walked with various degrees of enthusiasm toward school for a half-day of studies, and street vendors sold Heinz ketchup, Smuckers jam, Velveeta cheese and other U.S.
NEWS
November 3, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Near the end of a hard dirt road, in a depression among the rice paddies, lies Kwangju City Cemetery. A sign, written in Korean and English, identifies a knoll covered with simple black headstones. "This is Graveyard III," the sign says. "This place has become an eternal sacred land where 101 of thousands of democratic patriots lie buried. They were bitterly slain with the military dictator's firearms."
WORLD
May 10, 2010 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
In his Christmas Day 2009 column for the Korea Times, Michael Breen decided to lampoon such national newsmakers as President Lee Myung-bak and the pop idol Rain. Headlined "What People Got for Christmas," the English-language column also poked fun at global technology giant Samsung Electronics, referring to past bribery scandals as well as perceptions that its leaders are arrogant. The piece was meant as a satirical spoof, the columnist says, but Samsung wasn't laughing. Breen's column ran as local media reported that President Lee would soon pardon Samsung Chairman Lee Kun-hee on a 2008 conviction for tax evasion.
NEWS
July 3, 1988 | Associated Press
The National Assembly on Saturday rejected President Roh Tae Woo's choice for chief justice, the first such refusal in South Korea's history. It was also the first major test of power in the new, opposition-controlled Parliament. All past Assemblies have been controlled by the governing party. The leadership of the governing Democratic Justice Party, including its chairman Yoon Giel Joong and floor leader Kim Yoon Hwan, offered to resign after the vote. The offer was rejected.
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