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BUSINESS
November 18, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kim Su Hwan imagines catching the biggest fish alive. Choi In Woon wants to perfect his badminton game. Kim So Hyon would just sleep a lot. The three wage warriors and millions of fellow countrymen are busy spending future leisure time in their heads, as South Korea considers moving from a six-day workweek to the five-day version that is standard in the U.S., Japan and Western Europe. Korea also hopes to accomplish the shift in apparent defiance of conventional economic logic.
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NEWS
August 13, 1987
About 2,000 people took part in an anti-government demonstration in Seoul, and South Korea's spreading labor turmoil left hundreds of factories idle. Protesters chanted anti-government slogans during a 3 1/2-hour rally at the Roman Catholic Myongdong Cathedral in downtown Seoul, and police hurled scores of tear-gas grenades when about 1,000 people, many throwing rocks, tried to march off the cathedral grounds after the rally.
NEWS
April 28, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government of South Korea appeared to win a significant victory Tuesday in its labor reform efforts when one of the country's largest and traditionally most aggressive labor groups called off a threatened nationwide strike. The move is expected to cripple, at least in the short term, the momentum of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions, which represents about 600,000 workers.
NEWS
January 21, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To understand why President Kim Young Sam dramatically reversed himself and met today with his opponents for a possible breakthrough in South Korea's monthlong labor strife, consider the views of Jhee Byung Wook. He manages a hotel unhappily located across from the cathedral where workers and riot police have staged nightly confrontations. The restaurant has lost three-fourths of its business.
NEWS
January 23, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call him the kamikaze of South Korean politics. In moving dramatically to resolve South Korea's monthlong labor crisis, President Kim Young Sam has again displayed a penchant for employing stunning, bold tactics while keeping a keen eye on shifts in public opinion.
NEWS
August 19, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
In the biggest confrontation yet in South Korea's siege of labor strife, 2,000 police officers faced off Tuesday against more than 10 times that many angry Hyundai workers, and the police gave in. The workers' success was capped later when a high government official told them that the government will strongly recommend to Hyundai management that it settle the dispute soon.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An export boom that carried South Korea from poverty to the brink of entering the ranks of advanced industrialized nations over the last three decades has sputtered to an end, with no recovery in sight. A trade surplus that last year amounted to $8.9 billion has been all but wiped out, falling to a minuscule $600 million in the first 10 months this year. The U.S. trade deficit with South Korea that soared to $9.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
After a year of abstinence, Kim Woo Choong, the founder and chairman of the Daewoo Group, has started smoking again. "I quit until all our labor trouble broke out," said the 51-year-old entrepreneur who turned the tiny textile exporting firm that he co-founded with $9,000 in borrowed cash in 1967 into a $10-billion conglomerate. In a two-hour, 45-minute interview, however, labor strife was the only problem Kim cited for his group of companies or for South Korea.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1988 | JAMES FLANIGAN
In a few days the summer Olympics will open in South Korea, as seems fitting since that country of 44 million people manufactures more footwear than any other. Nike, Reebok, Converse, Adidas--you name the shoe for track or basketball, and Korea makes it. But that is changing. Korean shoe production is getting expensive, so the athletic shoe companies are looking to China and Thailand, the Philippines and Mexico to make the shoes.
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | Associated Press
About 10,000 workers marched through downtown Seoul on Saturday to protest plans by large companies to lay off workers amid a severe economic recession. "Guarantee job security!" the protesters chanted as they pumped their clenched fists into the air. The marchers swarmed out of a park in the center of the South Korean capital and marched along a busy boulevard through two commercial districts, causing traffic jams. No clashes were reported.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1998 | Reuters
A South Korean labor union called off a general strike scheduled for today, saying it did not want to endanger the country's economic recovery. "This doesn't mean we have decided to accept the tentative agreement between the government, management and unions," the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions said in a statement.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The withdrawal of a militant South Korean labor confederation from an agreement to endorse sweeping changes in labor laws renews the threat that strikes could undermine efforts to deal with the country's economic crisis. But disarray in the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions--which now has new hard-line leadership that called Tuesday for strikes starting Friday--also presents opportunities for the incoming administration of President-elect Kim Dae Jung, who takes office Feb. 25.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
South Korea and its militant labor unions today agreed to sweeping changes in labor laws that will make it easier for companies to fire workers as the country struggles with its worst economic crisis in decades. The agreement, the first of its kind in Korea, challenges a notion dear to many people here: That a job, once taken, is theirs for life.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1998 | From The Associated Press
In an unprecedented "town hall"-style meeting Sunday, President-elect Kim Dae Jung appealed to South Koreans to accept layoffs and other sacrifices so the nation can rebuild. "We're just entering a dark IMF tunnel," Kim said in a nationally televised meeting with a sampling of constituents. "The real ordeal will begin from now on."
BUSINESS
January 13, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When International Monetary Fund Chief Michel Camdessus meets today with the heads of South Korea's two largest labor unions, he will face the most formidable organized opposition to the IMF's controversial efforts to reform the beleaguered Korean economy.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1998 | Reuters
A South Korean labor union called off a general strike scheduled for today, saying it did not want to endanger the country's economic recovery. "This doesn't mean we have decided to accept the tentative agreement between the government, management and unions," the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions said in a statement.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
South Korea and its militant labor unions today agreed to sweeping changes in labor laws that will make it easier for companies to fire workers as the country struggles with its worst economic crisis in decades. The agreement, the first of its kind in Korea, challenges a notion dear to many people here: That a job, once taken, is theirs for life.
NEWS
March 11, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to quell the nationwide labor unrest that sparked costly strikes earlier this year, South Korean legislators Monday passed a revised labor bill with greater protections for workers and expanded union rights. But lawmakers admitted that the bipartisan compromise was not expected to completely satisfy either labor or management.
NEWS
January 25, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
South Korean strike leaders abandoned tent headquarters at Seoul's Myongdong Cathedral as the government and the opposition groped toward a compromise over a controversial new labor law. With little fanfare, leaders of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions left behind the ramshackle tent from which they directed almost a month of work stoppages. But leader Kwon Young Gil insisted that his outlawed union will continue its fight against the law.
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