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South Korea Labor Relations

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BUSINESS
February 13, 1998 | Reuters
A South Korean labor union called off a general strike scheduled for today, saying it did not want to endanger the country's economic recovery. "This doesn't mean we have decided to accept the tentative agreement between the government, management and unions," the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions said in a statement.
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BUSINESS
June 12, 2001 | Associated Press
Tens of thousands of workers, including thousands at South Korea's two airlines, walked off their jobs as they pushed for better pay. The Korean Confederation of Trade Unions, a militant nationwide labor umbrella group which has been responsible for many violent protests, estimated that 55,000 workers at 125 workplaces, including pilots at Korean Air and Asiana Airlines, joined the strike.
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BUSINESS
April 18, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Kim Dae Jung is facing the most serious labor challenge of his administration, with 13,000 auto workers already on strike and a militant labor confederation on Friday threatening broader action against privatization of state-owned firms. Authorities responded sharply to the escalating strike at Kia Motors Corp., the nation's third-largest auto maker. Prosecutors on Friday declared the 2-day-old strike illegal and threatened to send in police.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Kim Dae Jung is facing the most serious labor challenge of his administration, with 13,000 auto workers already on strike and a militant labor confederation on Friday threatening broader action against privatization of state-owned firms. Authorities responded sharply to the escalating strike at Kia Motors Corp., the nation's third-largest auto maker. Prosecutors on Friday declared the 2-day-old strike illegal and threatened to send in police.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Labor Dispute Hits Hyundai: South Korea's largest car maker said more than half its operations have ground to a halt in a dispute with workers over year-end bonuses. The 28,000 members of Hyundai Motor Co.'s union will take a strike vote next Tuesday. The dispute started in mid-December after labor leaders demanded an increase in bonus payments, which are part of wages under Korean law. Hyundai said it cannot afford higher bonuses.
NEWS
January 15, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Waving banners and shouting curses, tens of thousands of striking workers from two rival unions marched separately through South Korean cities Tuesday. Despite their show of bravado, the two labor groups remained divided over whether to press ahead with a large-scale strike, launched in protest of a new labor law that workers say threatens their jobs.
NEWS
April 28, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government of South Korea appeared to win a significant victory Tuesday in its labor reform efforts when one of the country's largest and traditionally most aggressive labor groups called off a threatened nationwide strike. The move is expected to cripple, at least in the short term, the momentum of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions, which represents about 600,000 workers.
NEWS
December 28, 1996 | From Associated Press
Subway workers in the capital joined hundreds of thousands of strikers today in South Korea's largest walkout ever, called to protest a new law that cuts organized labor's power. Prosecutors vowed to arrest union leaders and send riot police to break up illegal street demonstrations, while the government said it would prevent the strike from further damaging South Korea's already ailing economy.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The withdrawal of a militant South Korean labor confederation from an agreement to endorse sweeping changes in labor laws renews the threat that strikes could undermine efforts to deal with the country's economic crisis. But disarray in the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions--which now has new hard-line leadership that called Tuesday for strikes starting Friday--also presents opportunities for the incoming administration of President-elect Kim Dae Jung, who takes office Feb. 25.
NEWS
January 16, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aiming to defuse South Korea's sizzling labor crisis, ruling party Chairman Lee Hong Koo today offered to meet opposition leaders and introduce safeguards on job security. But union leaders rejected the gesture and vowed to continue their strike. The impasse sets the stage for a violent showdown, as reports mount that the government will storm Myongdong Cathedral this week and arrest seven labor leaders being harbored inside.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1998 | Reuters
A South Korean labor union called off a general strike scheduled for today, saying it did not want to endanger the country's economic recovery. "This doesn't mean we have decided to accept the tentative agreement between the government, management and unions," the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions said in a statement.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The withdrawal of a militant South Korean labor confederation from an agreement to endorse sweeping changes in labor laws renews the threat that strikes could undermine efforts to deal with the country's economic crisis. But disarray in the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions--which now has new hard-line leadership that called Tuesday for strikes starting Friday--also presents opportunities for the incoming administration of President-elect Kim Dae Jung, who takes office Feb. 25.
NEWS
January 16, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aiming to defuse South Korea's sizzling labor crisis, ruling party Chairman Lee Hong Koo today offered to meet opposition leaders and introduce safeguards on job security. But union leaders rejected the gesture and vowed to continue their strike. The impasse sets the stage for a violent showdown, as reports mount that the government will storm Myongdong Cathedral this week and arrest seven labor leaders being harbored inside.
NEWS
January 15, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Waving banners and shouting curses, tens of thousands of striking workers from two rival unions marched separately through South Korean cities Tuesday. Despite their show of bravado, the two labor groups remained divided over whether to press ahead with a large-scale strike, launched in protest of a new labor law that workers say threatens their jobs.
NEWS
December 28, 1996 | From Associated Press
Subway workers in the capital joined hundreds of thousands of strikers today in South Korea's largest walkout ever, called to protest a new law that cuts organized labor's power. Prosecutors vowed to arrest union leaders and send riot police to break up illegal street demonstrations, while the government said it would prevent the strike from further damaging South Korea's already ailing economy.
NEWS
December 27, 1996 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striking workers from unions representing 1.7 million members shut down much of South Korea's economy today in escalating protests against a new labor law and feared threats to civil liberties. The main target of worker fury was a law passed in a secretive predawn parliamentary session Thursday that makes it easier for employers to lay off workers and to hire replacements for strikers.
NEWS
December 27, 1996 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striking workers from unions representing 1.7 million members shut down much of South Korea's economy today in escalating protests against a new labor law and feared threats to civil liberties. The main target of worker fury was a law passed in a secretive predawn parliamentary session Thursday that makes it easier for employers to lay off workers and to hire replacements for strikers.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Labor Dispute Hits Hyundai: South Korea's largest car maker said more than half its operations have ground to a halt in a dispute with workers over year-end bonuses. The 28,000 members of Hyundai Motor Co.'s union will take a strike vote next Tuesday. The dispute started in mid-December after labor leaders demanded an increase in bonus payments, which are part of wages under Korean law. Hyundai said it cannot afford higher bonuses.
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