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BUSINESS
February 6, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
South Korea and its militant labor unions today agreed to sweeping changes in labor laws that will make it easier for companies to fire workers as the country struggles with its worst economic crisis in decades. The agreement, the first of its kind in Korea, challenges a notion dear to many people here: That a job, once taken, is theirs for life.
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WORLD
February 5, 2012 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
By his own admission, Park Jung-geun has long been an Internet wiseguy, a young photographer and blogger with a cyber chip on his shoulder whose favorite target for satire is the North Korean government. For months, his Twitter profile picture showed him with a near-empty bottle of whiskey in his hand, standing in front of a red-starred North Korean flag. Using the handle @seouldecadence, the 23-year-old re-tweeted posts fromPyongyang's Twitter account he deemed particularly ridiculous.
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NEWS
January 22, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In stunning concessions, President Kim Young Sam agreed Tuesday to reopen the National Assembly to rewrite his party's reviled revisions of labor and national security laws, and he suspended arrest warrants for leaders of the resulting protest strikes that have cost the South Korean economy more than $3 billion.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ahn Hyang Shim, 28, and her husband were filled with expectation as they entered Jinju Kaya Jamo Hospital on the outskirts of Pusan for the birth of their first child. They were told Ahn would need a caesarean because she hadn't produced enough water, but the doctor quickly reassured them that this was routine. That was the last time Ahn's family saw her conscious. During the caesarean she fell into a coma, and she remains in a vegetative state more than nine months later.
NEWS
January 25, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
South Korean strike leaders abandoned tent headquarters at Seoul's Myongdong Cathedral as the government and the opposition groped toward a compromise over a controversial new labor law. With little fanfare, leaders of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions left behind the ramshackle tent from which they directed almost a month of work stoppages. But leader Kwon Young Gil insisted that his outlawed union will continue its fight against the law.
NEWS
January 18, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Former South Korean President Chun Doo Hwan, who has been charged with mutiny, formally challenged the constitutional validity of a special law enacted to punish him and his former aides. An official at the Seoul District Court said Chun's lawyers filed an appeal with the court, requesting that it determine whether the special law violates the constitutional prohibition against retroactive legislation.
NEWS
February 20, 1989
Thousands of South Koreans defied a ban on protests and clashed with riot police in four cities, witnesses and radio reports said. About 10,000 students and workers in Seoul and three other cities took to the streets to demand President Roh Tae Woo's resignation and the revision of "vicious labor laws." Police said they detained about 700 protesters in Seoul. About 5,000 protesters battled police in Pusan, a southern port. Police also broke up protests in Ulsan and Taegu.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Limits on Foreign Ownership to Remain: Finance Minister Hong Jai-hyung said in a radio report that the government will keep in place a regulation that limits the stake overseas investors may take in local companies to 10%. In an interview with the state-run KBS radio last week, Hong said the ceiling will remain intact for at least the first six months of this year. However, Hong declined to say when the adjustment will be made. The ministry has promised the U.S.
NEWS
April 3, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A new accord that gives South Korea more jurisdiction over U.S. soldiers accused of crimes has gone into effect. The revised treaty allows U.S. soldiers accused of murder, rape, arson, drug trafficking and eight other serious crimes to be turned over to South Korean police upon indictment. The accord replaces an earlier agreement under which indicted soldiers remained in U.S. military custody until they were convicted in the South Korean judicial system and all appeals were exhausted.
NEWS
December 28, 1996 | From Associated Press
Subway workers in the capital joined hundreds of thousands of strikers today in South Korea's largest walkout ever, called to protest a new law that cuts organized labor's power. Prosecutors vowed to arrest union leaders and send riot police to break up illegal street demonstrations, while the government said it would prevent the strike from further damaging South Korea's already ailing economy.
NEWS
April 3, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A new accord that gives South Korea more jurisdiction over U.S. soldiers accused of crimes has gone into effect. The revised treaty allows U.S. soldiers accused of murder, rape, arson, drug trafficking and eight other serious crimes to be turned over to South Korean police upon indictment. The accord replaces an earlier agreement under which indicted soldiers remained in U.S. military custody until they were convicted in the South Korean judicial system and all appeals were exhausted.
NEWS
November 6, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1982, when Yu suffered a depression so severe he refused to leave his house, was afraid to meet anyone, shouted at his family and sometimes threw things in rage, his parents called a local mental institution to come and take him away. When he arrived there, he says, he was left with his feet chained together for a week.
NEWS
December 19, 1998 | Associated Press
South Korea on Friday banned funding for research of human cloning but acknowledged that it cannot stop "maverick doctors" from forging ahead with the controversial procedure. The move came after a medical team at Seoul's Kyunghee University announced earlier this week that it had cloned a human embryo in its initial stage of development. The announcement caught the government off guard and sparked protest rallies by South Koreans, whose deep-rooted Confucian beliefs were shaken by the news.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
South Korea and its militant labor unions today agreed to sweeping changes in labor laws that will make it easier for companies to fire workers as the country struggles with its worst economic crisis in decades. The agreement, the first of its kind in Korea, challenges a notion dear to many people here: That a job, once taken, is theirs for life.
NEWS
July 17, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A 689-year-old ban on marriage between people with the same surname was declared unconstitutional, a significant development in a country where 20% of people have the last name Kim. In ruling that the law was outdated, South Korea's supreme court clears the way for about 60,000 couples already living together to marry. Though the couples share the same clan names, there is no evidence of blood ties.
NEWS
January 25, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
South Korean strike leaders abandoned tent headquarters at Seoul's Myongdong Cathedral as the government and the opposition groped toward a compromise over a controversial new labor law. With little fanfare, leaders of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions left behind the ramshackle tent from which they directed almost a month of work stoppages. But leader Kwon Young Gil insisted that his outlawed union will continue its fight against the law.
NEWS
December 20, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A law requested by President Kim Young Sam that lifts the statute of limitations on the prosecution of two former presidents and their military cronies for a 1980 massacre of pro-democracy protesters won parliamentary approval Tuesday. Former President Chun Doo Hwan, 64, is already imprisoned on insurrection charges for a 1979 mutiny, and former President Roh Tae Woo, 63, is in jail facing bribery charges.
NEWS
July 17, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A 689-year-old ban on marriage between people with the same surname was declared unconstitutional, a significant development in a country where 20% of people have the last name Kim. In ruling that the law was outdated, South Korea's supreme court clears the way for about 60,000 couples already living together to marry. Though the couples share the same clan names, there is no evidence of blood ties.
NEWS
January 23, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call him the kamikaze of South Korean politics. In moving dramatically to resolve South Korea's monthlong labor crisis, President Kim Young Sam has again displayed a penchant for employing stunning, bold tactics while keeping a keen eye on shifts in public opinion.
NEWS
January 22, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In stunning concessions, President Kim Young Sam agreed Tuesday to reopen the National Assembly to rewrite his party's reviled revisions of labor and national security laws, and he suspended arrest warrants for leaders of the resulting protest strikes that have cost the South Korean economy more than $3 billion.
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