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NEWS
February 3, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Saying "we had to struggle to keep our pride" while suppressing anti-government demonstrations, a group of young officers has shaken South Korea's police establishment with a demand for political neutrality. Their statement, recently given to local newspapers, apologized to the Korean people for "shameful" acts during the demonstrations last year. One of the police officers told the newspaper Dong-A Ilbo that "we were angered at having to face the hatred of the people."
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NEWS
May 23, 1993 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 1,000 students clashed with riot police Saturday as they marched to protest growing U.S. pressure on North Korea and America's alleged role in South Korea's brutal crackdown on a 1980 civil uprising. The students chanted, "Yankee go home," and sang anti-American songs as they made their way from a Seoul campus toward a nearby U.S. military base. They swung steel pipes at riot police who blocked their way, while students on a nearby rooftop hurled chunks of concrete.
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NEWS
April 25, 1989 | From Reuters
South Korean riot police fired tear gas Monday to disperse thousands of workers who took to the streets of the southeastern city of Masan after an anti-government rally, witnesses said. The protesters were among more than 10,000 workers who crowded a plaza in the city to demand higher wages and an end to what they called government repression of labor. In nearby Changwon, about 2,000 strikers from consumer electronics giant Goldstar, some of them rolling gasoline-filled drums, marched in the streets but were dispersed by riot police firing tear gas. Government officials say the export-led South Korean economy faces a crisis because of labor disputes.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Thousands of riot police firing tear gas stormed the world's largest shipyard, clashing with striking workers barricaded inside and armed with homemade weapons. About 10,000 police poured through five gates leading into the huge seaside Hyundai Heavy Industries Co. shipyard in Ulsan, about 200 miles southeast of Seoul. About 20,000 of the shipyard's 24,000 employees are unionized.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Thousands of radical students and dissidents shouting anti-government slogans fought riot police with firebombs and rocks in six South Korean cities on the eve of President Roh Tae Woo's second anniversary in office. In Seoul, about 1,000 students held a rally demanding dissolution of a new governing party that includes Roh's party and two former opposition groups.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Thousands of riot police firing tear gas stormed the world's largest shipyard, clashing with striking workers barricaded inside and armed with homemade weapons. About 10,000 police poured through five gates leading into the huge seaside Hyundai Heavy Industries Co. shipyard in Ulsan, about 200 miles southeast of Seoul. About 20,000 of the shipyard's 24,000 employees are unionized.
NEWS
March 8, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Riot police Friday fought about 2,400 students demanding the resignation of President Chun Doo Hwan as six American politicians arrived to assess chances for greater democracy in South Korea. Witnesses said more than 1,000 riot police and plainclothesmen stormed the campus at Seoul National University, firing tear gas to break up a crowd listening to speeches by anti-government student leaders. More than 2,000 students shouting "Down with dictatorship!" and "Abolish the constitution!"
NEWS
May 23, 1993 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 1,000 students clashed with riot police Saturday as they marched to protest growing U.S. pressure on North Korea and America's alleged role in South Korea's brutal crackdown on a 1980 civil uprising. The students chanted, "Yankee go home," and sang anti-American songs as they made their way from a Seoul campus toward a nearby U.S. military base. They swung steel pipes at riot police who blocked their way, while students on a nearby rooftop hurled chunks of concrete.
WORLD
June 10, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Embassy and those of four other nations with troops in Iraq were closed in Canberra after envelopes containing a white powder were intercepted, Australian authorities said. The other embassies were those of Britain, Japan, Italy and South Korea. Police said tests showed the powder in at least two parcels was not harmful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1985 | Associated Press
A new opposition party, formed by the followers of two men who are barred from politics, was formally launched Friday with a pledge to "resurrect a genuine parliamentary democracy" in South Korea. Police blockaded the house of dissident leader Kim Young Sam to keep him from attending the new party's inaugural convention at a downtown hotel. Kim Dae Jung, the other dissident leader, is expected to return Feb. 8 from self-imposed exile in the United States.
NEWS
April 25, 1989 | From Reuters
South Korean riot police fired tear gas Monday to disperse thousands of workers who took to the streets of the southeastern city of Masan after an anti-government rally, witnesses said. The protesters were among more than 10,000 workers who crowded a plaza in the city to demand higher wages and an end to what they called government repression of labor. In nearby Changwon, about 2,000 strikers from consumer electronics giant Goldstar, some of them rolling gasoline-filled drums, marched in the streets but were dispersed by riot police firing tear gas. Government officials say the export-led South Korean economy faces a crisis because of labor disputes.
NEWS
February 3, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Saying "we had to struggle to keep our pride" while suppressing anti-government demonstrations, a group of young officers has shaken South Korea's police establishment with a demand for political neutrality. Their statement, recently given to local newspapers, apologized to the Korean people for "shameful" acts during the demonstrations last year. One of the police officers told the newspaper Dong-A Ilbo that "we were angered at having to face the hatred of the people."
NEWS
March 8, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Riot police Friday fought about 2,400 students demanding the resignation of President Chun Doo Hwan as six American politicians arrived to assess chances for greater democracy in South Korea. Witnesses said more than 1,000 riot police and plainclothesmen stormed the campus at Seoul National University, firing tear gas to break up a crowd listening to speeches by anti-government student leaders. More than 2,000 students shouting "Down with dictatorship!" and "Abolish the constitution!"
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