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December 2, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reeling from a series of shocks that have rivaled the coups of the past, South Korea is bracing for still more blows that promise to profoundly change the nation's political structure. A former president, Roh Tae Woo, is in jail awaiting indictment for bribery after confessing that he accumulated a slush fund of $653 million while in office.
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NEWS
April 26, 2002 | BARBARA DEMICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a boisterous new experiment with U.S.-style primaries, a relatively unknown human rights lawyer has emerged as the front-runner to succeed Kim Dae Jung as president of South Korea. Defying all predictions, 56-year-old lawyer Roh Mu Hyun has surged in polls in the last few weeks and is now shown as beating his closest rival by 11 to 26 percentage points. So precipitous has his rise been that the political pundits have nicknamed the phenomenon the Roh poong--the Roh tempest.
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NEWS
January 24, 1996 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A lifelong fighter for South Korean democracy, President Kim Young Sam would seem now to have assured himself a place of honor in his nation's history. Kim, 68, has dealt a devastating blow to his old enemies--the ancien regime forces of military rule represented by former presidents Chun Doo Hwan and Roh Tae Woo. He has thrown both those former generals into prison on charges of insurrection, sedition and corruption for a 1979 mutiny, a 1980 massacre and for allegedly taking bribes in office.
NEWS
May 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
After just two days on the job, South Korean Justice Minister Ahn Dong Soo quit today in a controversy over a draft of his inaugural speech. The flap erupted when Ahn's office faxed a draft of the speech to reporters Monday. In it, Ahn said he "swears loyalty with a determination to sacrifice my life to help the Kim Dae Jung administration take power again." Ahn, a noted human rights lawyer, disavowed any knowledge of the draft. His secretary said someone else wrote it.
NEWS
May 23, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The mayor of South Korea's second-largest city, Pusan, and seven serving or former lawmakers were charged with taking bribes from the founder of the scandal-hit Hanbo Group. The eight were among 33 politicians named by Hanbo's founder as having accepted his money, said chief prosecutor Shim Jae Ryun.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1998 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korea's preeminent intellectual, Kim Donggil, is deeply troubled over his nation's state of affairs. "Politicians cannot be trusted, hypocrisy is rampant and the press is crawling," the U.S.-educated historian said during a visit to Los Angeles last week. South Korea puts on a face of democracy, Kim said, but inside, the nation of 43 million continues to suffer from the legacy of decades of authoritarian rule--six years after the last general left the presidential mansion.
NEWS
February 23, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As part of its amnesty program under President Kim Dae Jung, South Korea announced Monday that it will free two long-term political prisoners, along with 17 suspected spies and more than 1,500 petty criminals. Neither the two dissidents nor the suspected spies, most of whom are thought to be North Koreans, will have to sign statements confirming that they will obey South Korea's laws.
NEWS
February 26, 1998 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New President Kim Dae Jung has been said to hold a ninth-degree black belt in South Korean politics. But he took an unceremonious kick Wednesday when, just hours after he took office, the opposition boycotted parliament in rejection of his nominee for prime minister. Stocks sagged 4.
NEWS
March 3, 1998 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bucking a hostile parliament, new South Korean President Kim Dae Jung today appointed a 17-member Cabinet and indicated that he will name his coalition partner, the beleaguered Kim Jong Pil, acting prime minister. The move came after the National Assembly adjourned Monday amid shouting and shoving as opposition leaders tried to block approval of Kim Jong Pil's appointment.
NEWS
March 5, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Parliament voted overwhelmingly to approve President Kim Young Sam's choice for prime minister: Koh Kun, known for steering clear of scandal and corruption. Koh was mayor of Seoul from 1988 to 1990 under former President Roh Tae Woo, but he resigned in a dispute with the administration over a corrupt land rezoning deal. He succeeds Lee Soo Sung, who was premier for 15 months before he was sacrificed to take responsibility for a scandal over loans to failed Hanbo Iron & Steel Co.
NEWS
August 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
President Kim Dae Jung replaced eight of the 19 members of his Cabinet today, naming a new finance minister to allay criticism that the pace of his economic reform program has been sluggish. Kim retained Prime Minister Lee Han Dong in his largely ceremonial post in the reshuffle. Most of the ministers affected held economic posts and were responsible for implementing reforms drawn up more than 2 1/2 years ago during Asia's currency crisis.
NEWS
June 12, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kim Dong Ki was a 35-year-old North Korean intelligence agent when he was caught spying by archenemy South Korea in 1966 and thrown into jail. Thirty-three years later, when Kim was freed in an amnesty program, an astonishing thing happened: South Koreans embraced him with a hero's welcome. Taxi drivers here in Kwangju gave him free rides when they learned his identity. A human rights group rented an immaculate house for him. Townspeople donated new appliances.
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Kim Dae Jung's party placed a distant second in key parliamentary elections as fed-up South Koreans tossed out incumbents and tainted politicians by the score, voted for regional favorites or stayed away from the polls in record numbers, according to unofficial results today.
NEWS
April 11, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although he is planning a historic summit with North Korea and his economic reforms are popular in the West, South Korean President Kim Dae Jung is in danger of becoming a lame duck with nearly three years left in his term. Facing voters fed up with corruption, party infighting and political gridlock, Kim's party may fail to muster a majority in parliament in elections Thursday.
NEWS
January 23, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A South Korean civic organization's blacklist of 164 candidates in April elections has spurred a legal and political showdown that analysts say could fundamentally alter the face of this country's young democracy. When U.S. nonprofit groups cite candidates they dislike, few take notice. But a citizens movement launched here this month to expand voter oversight, fight corruption and, in effect, "throw the bums out" has rudely awakened the cozy world of South Korean politics.
NEWS
January 14, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
South Korea's president replaced his finance and foreign ministers in a partial Cabinet shake-up that involved five other posts. In Seoul, President Kim Dae Jung named Lee Hun Jai--head of the Financial Supervisory Commission--as the new finance minister. The move was seen as a sign of Kim's determination to continue economic reforms. The president also replaced Hong Soon Young as foreign minister with Lee Joung Binn.
NEWS
April 8, 1996 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three legislators are seeking reelection from jail--and might win. Some college youths drumming up enthusiasm for President Kim Young Sam's ruling party are dancing in the streets; others are throwing firebombs to bring the government down--but aiming carefully, so as not to hurt anyone. Then there is the opposition advertisement decrying high prices--starring "speechless" anchovies so proud of their value that they just don't know what to say.
NEWS
December 16, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Kim Young Sam, in a move to give his government a more reformist face, appointed South Korea's top legal scholar Friday to serve as his next prime minister. Lee Soo Song, president of Seoul National University, the nation's most prestigious educational institution, will take office at a time of intense political turmoil. Kim's two immediate predecessors, former Presidents Chun Doo Hwan and Roh Tae Woo, were recently jailed on mutiny and bribery charges.
NEWS
February 23, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As part of its amnesty program under President Kim Dae Jung, South Korea announced Monday that it will free two long-term political prisoners, along with 17 suspected spies and more than 1,500 petty criminals. Neither the two dissidents nor the suspected spies, most of whom are thought to be North Koreans, will have to sign statements confirming that they will obey South Korea's laws.
NEWS
February 13, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In marked contrast with recent grim U.S. reports, South Korean President Kim Dae Jung, citing what he said were "positive" signals coming out of North Korea, sounded an upbeat note Friday about the possibility of a rapprochement with his nation's rogue neighbor.
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