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May 28, 1988
South Korean Home Minister Lee Choon-Koo ordered police Friday to maintain surveillance on foreigners spending extended time in the country without a specific purpose as the South Korean government continued its efforts to ensure the security of the Olympic Games. Seoul has also inaugurated a 13,000-member police Security Task Force. With the Games scheduled to begin Sept. 17, the South Korean government was concerned about terrorist attacks, especially by the North Korean Red Army.
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WORLD
February 5, 2012 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
By his own admission, Park Jung-geun has long been an Internet wiseguy, a young photographer and blogger with a cyber chip on his shoulder whose favorite target for satire is the North Korean government. For months, his Twitter profile picture showed him with a near-empty bottle of whiskey in his hand, standing in front of a red-starred North Korean flag. Using the handle @seouldecadence, the 23-year-old re-tweeted posts fromPyongyang's Twitter account he deemed particularly ridiculous.
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NEWS
November 18, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney departs for South Korea today to discuss prospects for further U.S. military cuts in the vast Pacific region and to address the volatile issue of nuclear weapons on the Korean Peninsula. He will take part in the annual U.S.-South Korea security meeting that begins Wednesday and briefly visit Japan before flying home Saturday.
WORLD
August 21, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
With a shudder, Kim Deuk-uy recalls the gloominess of the 1998 Asian financial crisis. Back then, Kim worked for a securities company that was shedding employees like a snake sheds skin. Kim could see it: The nation's rocky finances would lead to a change in the dynamic between workers and executives in South Korea. "It became a good excuse to fire the full-time employees for no good reason, hire them back at two-thirds of the payment as a part-time employee, though they were doing exactly the same job," he recalled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1994
The ante has gone up again in the North Korea nuclear poker game. Last week Pyongyang, reneging on an earlier promise, barred inspectors of the International Atomic Energy Agency from visiting facilities that could be involved in making nuclear weapons.
NEWS
May 17, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER and SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writers
The Olympic clock is ticking: On small digital displays in hotels and government offices and on a huge scoreboard mounted above the plaza in front of City Hall, South Koreans are counting the days until the Olympic Games begin Sept. 17. But it is early August that many observers of North Korea, worried about terrorist attacks, are anxiously awaiting.
NEWS
November 1, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
President Roh Tae Woo said Monday that the South Korean people, who once welcomed American troops, would now prefer "a lower U.S. military profile" in their country. But Roh told an interviewer that steps initiated by his government to alter the military arrangement here are aimed at improving "the Korean-American security relationship" to the "mutual benefit of both countries." And he made it clear that he is in no hurry to have these steps put into effect. Now being discussed with U.S.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Artist Shin Hak Chul landed in jail last summer because of his fans--the paper kind. A student project to reprint one of Shin's oil paintings on hand-held paper fans caught the discriminating eye of an art critic in the anti-Communist bureau of the Seoul Metropolitan Police Headquarters. Never mind that Shin's work, "Rice Planting," was painted in obscurity two years ago. Authorities now think it glorifies North Korea by depicting a Utopian scene of smiling peasants near Mt.
NEWS
June 9, 1988
Thousands of South Korean students, hurling firebombs and rocks, battled riot police in Seoul after the government announced that it will deploy 60,000 officers to prevent students from marching to the border with North Korea for reunification talks. Police said 482 people were detained after raids on rail and bus stations in search of youths suspected of planning to participate.
WORLD
July 20, 2010 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates arrived in Seoul on Monday for a high-level show of unity expected to include the announcement of major military exercises by the U.S. and South Korea four months after the sinking of a South Korean warship. Gates will be joined in Seoul by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton in talks with South Korean counterparts, meetings that U.S. officials said were aimed at sending a signal to North Korea in response to the sinking of the Cheonan, allegedly by Northern forces.
NEWS
February 18, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
B.G. Bae defected from North Korea 16 years ago--but the old flash of terror he once felt toward the ominous regime he left behind revisited him Monday when Seoul police called and warned him not to go out at night, meet strangers or take unusual phone calls.
NEWS
November 25, 1996 | TYLER MARSHALL and DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton and South Korean President Kim Young Sam appeared Sunday to patch up a dispute that had strained ties between the United States and one of its foremost Pacific allies, but they failed to agree on ways to restart stalled initiatives aimed at bringing peace to the Korean peninsula.
NEWS
September 20, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A violent espionage drama between the two Koreas deepened Thursday as Southern forces killed a total of seven infiltrators from the enemy North and a captured spy confessed that his side had conducted intelligence operations on South Korean air defense systems. The casualties brought to 18 the number of North Koreans left dead after their submarine ran aground near the eastern city of Kangnung on Wednesday in what Seoul is calling Pyongyang's worst provocation in nearly 30 years.
NEWS
April 7, 1996 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just five days before crucial South Korean elections, Pyongyang's efforts to undermine the armistice that ended the 1950-53 Korean War have suddenly made national security a major campaign issue. Responding to harsh North Korean rhetoric attacking the armistice, plus violation of the agreement by North Korean forces in the truce village of Panmunjom, South Korean President Kim Young Sam convened a special national security meeting Saturday and called for a "heightened, iron-tight defense."
NEWS
June 20, 1994 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After weeks of escalating tensions, a North Korean offer relayed through former President Jimmy Carter may provide "an opening" for resolving the standoff over the isolated Communist nation's nuclear program, a senior Clinton Administration official said Sunday. "There may be an opening here" to defuse the crisis, Assistant Secretary of State Robert L.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1988 | ALEENE MacMINN, Times Television Editor
The last time NBC was scheduled to telecast the Summer Olympics, the United States boycotted and the network had to stay home with the athletes. Eight years later, the network finds itself preparing to cover the XXIV Summer Olympics here amid tight security precautions against potential disruptions. The heavy security was apparent Tuesday as a group of about 30 U.S. journalists toured the impressive Seoul Sports Complex and the nearby Olympic Park.
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
The South Korean government Tuesday gave its strongest indication to date that it intends to rein in the feared intelligence organizations that helped past rulers and the current leadership alike to consolidate their grasp on power.
NEWS
June 19, 1994 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leaders of North and South Korea tentatively agreed Saturday to an unprecedented summit meeting, but the Clinton Administration cautioned that the United States will continue to maintain pressure on North Korea to freeze its nuclear program. One senior Administration official hailed as a "positive development" the reports that South Korean President Kim Young Sam had accepted an offer from his North Korean counterpart, Kim Il Sung, to meet.
NEWS
May 30, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a breakdown in talks between a U.N. team and North Korea, U.S. lawmakers issued new warnings Sunday about the consequences if Pyongyang does not agree to international monitoring to prevent development of a nuclear weapons program. Calling the defense of South Korea a "sacred obligation," Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Ga.) said the North Korean government's brinkmanship could ultimately endanger its survival.
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