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South Korea Suits

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NEWS
September 20, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a second major legal setback for Northrop Corp., an international arbitration group has concluded that the company paid $6.25 million to a South Korean power broker in a possibly illegal attempt to sell its jet fighters to that country's air force. The arbitrator rejected Northrop's claim that the money was intended to finance the building of a luxury hotel. The ruling said that three company vice presidents were aware of the real purpose of the funds and that its chairman, Thomas V.
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BUSINESS
March 1, 1998 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the window of his small Westside apartment, Bong Koo Cho can gaze out at the ocean, but only in his mind's eye can he look across to the life and land he left more than a decade ago. Then, Cho was one of South Korea's wealthiest businessmen, the owner of Samho, one of the nation's biggest conglomerates, and the head of a sprawling estate in the heart of Seoul. Chauffeurs drove him around. Maids waited on his wife. But in 1984, his world was overturned.
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BUSINESS
October 27, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sealed filing in a Korean civil lawsuit, Northrop has been accused of paying $6.25 million in an influence-peddling scheme to sell jet fighters in Korea and then paying an additional $1.5 million to cover it up. The filing, which was made last May by Korean defendants in a suit brought by Northrop, contains a number of new allegations about Northrop's unusual relationship with various Koreans in the mid-1980s.
NEWS
September 20, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a second major legal setback for Northrop Corp., an international arbitration group has concluded that the company paid $6.25 million to a South Korean power broker in a possibly illegal attempt to sell its jet fighters to that country's air force. The arbitrator rejected Northrop's claim that the money was intended to finance the building of a luxury hotel. The ruling said that three company vice presidents were aware of the real purpose of the funds and that its chairman, Thomas V.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1998 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the window of his small Westside apartment, Bong Koo Cho can gaze out at the ocean, but only in his mind's eye can he look across to the life and land he left more than a decade ago. Then, Cho was one of South Korea's wealthiest businessmen, the owner of Samho, one of the nation's biggest conglomerates, and the head of a sprawling estate in the heart of Seoul. Chauffeurs drove him around. Maids waited on his wife. But in 1984, his world was overturned.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sealed filing in a Korean civil lawsuit, Northrop has been accused of paying $6.25 million in an influence-peddling scheme to sell jet fighters in Korea and then paying an additional $1.5 million to cover it up. The filing, which was made last May by Korean defendants in a suit brought by Northrop, contains a number of new allegations about Northrop's unusual relationship with various Koreans in the mid-1980s.
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