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South Korea Travel Restrictions

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NEWS
February 5, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A South Korean student who made a publicized but illegal trip to North Korea last year was sentenced to 10 years in prison by a Seoul court. Im Su Kyong, 21, and her co-defendent, Father Moon Kyu Hyun, who was given an eight-year term, were sentenced under South Korea's stringent national security laws for their trip last July to a youth festival.
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NEWS
July 15, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korea on Thursday banned visits by its citizens to attend the funeral of North Korean leader Kim Il Sung, while North Korea announced it would welcome such visits and revealed that a prominent South Korean already had arrived in Pyongyang. Bo Hi Pak, a close assistant to the Rev. Sun Myung Moon, founder of the Unification Church, was shown on North Korean television arriving at Pyongyang airport Wednesday.
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BUSINESS
August 19, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Crackdown on Travelers Scheduled: South Korea will impose curbs on spending by its citizens overseas in a bid to crack down on free-spending, carousing travelers who "sully" the national honor and burden the treasury, officials said last week. Violators will face having their passports--or worse, their credit cards--revoked and could face tax audits and unwanted police and customs attention. No date has been given for enforcing the new rules.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Credit Card Tapes Submitted: American Express has submitted computerized records of account holders' overseas spending as demanded by the Bank of Korea, a company official said. The financial and travel services company had delayed turning over the magnetic tape-recording overseas charges from May to August to South Korea's central bank, which wants to check credit card use for evasion of foreign exchange controls.
NEWS
September 2, 1988
South Korea refused to admit a Frenchwoman linked to Black September terrorists who killed 12 people at the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, officials in Seoul said. The 40-year-old woman, whose name was not released, arrived Tuesday from Tokyo and was detained overnight, then put on a flight back to Tokyo. Officials said she was on an Interpol list of members of extremist groups. South Korea is mounting a large security operation in advance of the Summer Olympics, which open in Seoul on Sept. 17.
NEWS
August 3, 1989 | JOHN H. LEE, Times Staff Writer
A group of 25 people protesting the actions of the South Korean government ended a four-day hunger strike Wednesday at a South-Central Los Angeles church. The demonstrators, who ranged from students and businessmen to ministers and a 12-year-old girl, began their fast Sunday to coincide with a hunger strike begun a day earlier by a young South Korean woman. The woman, a 20-year-old college student named Im Suk Yong, was denied permission to return to her country after visiting North Korea.
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | From Associated Press
U.S. officials put a popular entertainment and disco district in Seoul off limits to American personnel Thursday in an attempt to stem anti-American violence and protect U.S. soldiers. A statement by the U.S. 8th Army for the 43,800 U.S. troops, thousands of civilian employees and their dependents in South Korea said the Itaewon entertainment district would be off limits from midnight until 5 a.m., effective today.
SPORTS
September 10, 1988 | JULIE CART
South Africa's international isolation grows ever worse. According to Gert Le Roux, the director of the South African Athletic Union, the International Olympic Committee has directed that the South African television network be allocated only 15 minutes a day of the feed from the Games at Seoul, starting next Saturday. "Despite our interest, and our ability to pay for the rights, the IOC won't let us watch the Games," Le Roux said Friday from his office in Pretoria.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1990 | NANCY YOSHIHARA
Australia is bidding g'bye to its immensely popular advertising campaign featuring actor Paul Hogan ("Toss another shrimp on the barbie") this year. The Australian Tourist Commission is yielding to a request by the actor to stop the 6-year-old campaign. Hogan did the commercials for free and went on to greater fame with Crocodile Dundee. He's tired of the repeated use of the first commercial he did for Australia in 1984.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1990 | SOON NEO LIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The flood of Japanese visiting the United States gets plenty of attention, but tourists from South Korea are now getting some too. Although the number of Korean tourists is small by comparison with the Japanese, they represent an emerging market for the United States, and particularly Los Angeles, which has the largest Korean community outside the country itself.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1990 | NANCY YOSHIHARA
Australia is bidding g'bye to its immensely popular advertising campaign featuring actor Paul Hogan ("Toss another shrimp on the barbie") this year. The Australian Tourist Commission is yielding to a request by the actor to stop the 6-year-old campaign. Hogan did the commercials for free and went on to greater fame with Crocodile Dundee. He's tired of the repeated use of the first commercial he did for Australia in 1984.
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | From Associated Press
U.S. officials put a popular entertainment and disco district in Seoul off limits to American personnel Thursday in an attempt to stem anti-American violence and protect U.S. soldiers. A statement by the U.S. 8th Army for the 43,800 U.S. troops, thousands of civilian employees and their dependents in South Korea said the Itaewon entertainment district would be off limits from midnight until 5 a.m., effective today.
NEWS
February 5, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A South Korean student who made a publicized but illegal trip to North Korea last year was sentenced to 10 years in prison by a Seoul court. Im Su Kyong, 21, and her co-defendent, Father Moon Kyu Hyun, who was given an eight-year term, were sentenced under South Korea's stringent national security laws for their trip last July to a youth festival.
NEWS
August 23, 1989
South Korean prosecutors said they have enough evidence to indict the leader of the country's largest opposition party in connection with a legislator's secret trip to North Korea. The prosecutor's office in Seoul said it will decide whether to bring formal charges against Kim Dae Jung, leader of the Party for Peace and Democracy, after further investigation.
NEWS
August 3, 1989 | JOHN H. LEE, Times Staff Writer
A group of 25 people protesting the actions of the South Korean government ended a four-day hunger strike Wednesday at a South-Central Los Angeles church. The demonstrators, who ranged from students and businessmen to ministers and a 12-year-old girl, began their fast Sunday to coincide with a hunger strike begun a day earlier by a young South Korean woman. The woman, a 20-year-old college student named Im Suk Yong, was denied permission to return to her country after visiting North Korea.
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