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July 5, 1992 | ASHLEY DUNN and SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In years to come, when historians examine the roots of the Los Angeles riots of 1992, they will be led not to the city's most desperate housing projects, but to neighborhoods of manicured lawns, weekend barbecues and unbarred windows. And when they sift through police records for the first documented act of violence, they will find not the armed hand of a gangster, but the raised fist of a 19-year-old store clerk who was so enraged at the verdicts in the Rodney G.
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NEWS
July 5, 1992 | ASHLEY DUNN and SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In years to come, when historians examine the roots of the Los Angeles riots of 1992, they will be led not to the city's most desperate housing projects, but to neighborhoods of manicured lawns, weekend barbecues and unbarred windows. And when they sift through police records for the first documented act of violence, they will find not the armed hand of a gangster, but the raised fist of a 19-year-old store clerk who was so enraged at the verdicts in the Rodney G.
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NEWS
February 17, 1992 | CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The changes came gradually, in seemingly unconnected fragments. The corner jazz club became a parking lot. The neighborhood pharmacy closed its doors and the marquee came down at the theater. A new family, speaking a different language, moved in down the street after the elderly widow passed away. Gone was the pool hall where neighborhood men bumped heads and billiard balls into the wee hours. A welding shop took its place, an "I Love El Salvador" sticker displayed on the wall.
NEWS
February 17, 1992 | CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The changes came gradually, in seemingly unconnected fragments. The corner jazz club became a parking lot. The neighborhood pharmacy closed its doors and the marquee came down at the theater. A new family, speaking a different language, moved in down the street after the elderly widow passed away. Gone was the pool hall where neighborhood men bumped heads and billiard balls into the wee hours. A welding shop took its place, an "I Love El Salvador" sticker displayed on the wall.
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