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South Los Angeles Development And Redevelopment

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1992
In the first test of the city's new "Buy American" law, a City Council panel on Wednesday voted to require firms seeking a multimillion-dollar garbage can contract to build a manufacturing facility in South Los Angeles. The Public Works Committee voted to require that a minimum 10% bid preference be offered to companies pledging to build a factory in the riot-torn area. Panel members noted, however, that the plan still must be reviewed by lawyers.
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BUSINESS
October 13, 1992 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last January, the federal agency regulating the nation's credit unions rejected with little fanfare an application to charter an unprecedented credit union serving 600,000 residents living in the 50-square-miles of southern Los Angeles. Officials with National Credit Union Administration's regional office in Concord at the time expressed concern over the "the appropriateness of the common bond which defines the community, and the economic vitality of the proposed institution."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1992 | BILL BOYARSKY
Some of Tom Bradley's proudest accomplishments went up in smoke in the past two days, points the mayor would want mentioned in his political epitaph: He calmed racial tensions in Los Angeles by opening up City Hall to all races, and he inspired a return of markets, shops, record stores, drug stores and other retail enterprises that had been driven from South Los Angeles by the 1965 fires of Watts. This year's flames--the fires of Rodney King--destroyed chain drug stores and supermarkets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1992
In the first test of the city's new "Buy American" law, a City Council panel on Wednesday voted to require firms seeking a multimillion-dollar garbage can contract to build a manufacturing facility in South Los Angeles. The Public Works Committee voted to require that a minimum 10% bid preference be offered to companies pledging to build a factory in the riot-torn area. Panel members noted, however, that the plan still must be reviewed by lawyers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1991 | BILL BOYARSKY
"It's like graffiti," said Sister Diane Donoghue, casting a disgusted look at the old tires, wine bottles and beer cans in the South Los Angeles lot. "You just can't let it sit there." So, on Saturday, Sept. 28, Sister Diane and residents of the working-class neighborhood southeast of downtown will clean up the big lot at 28th Street and Maple Avenue and remove the graffiti from the walls of an adjacent home. Extra help will come from members of the California Conservation Corps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1992 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thrifty Drug, the oldest and largest drugstore chain in Los Angeles, did not hesitate to rebuild the four outlets it lost to the fire and vandalism of the Watts riots in 1965--a decision, chain officials recall, that signaled their commitment to South Los Angeles and its residents. But Thrifty is not likely to undertake a second round of rebuilding in South Los Angeles now.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1992 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last January, the federal agency regulating the nation's credit unions rejected with little fanfare an application to charter an unprecedented credit union serving 600,000 residents living in the 50-square-miles of southern Los Angeles. Officials with National Credit Union Administration's regional office in Concord at the time expressed concern over the "the appropriateness of the common bond which defines the community, and the economic vitality of the proposed institution."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1992 | BILL BOYARSKY
Some of Tom Bradley's proudest accomplishments went up in smoke in the past two days, points the mayor would want mentioned in his political epitaph: He calmed racial tensions in Los Angeles by opening up City Hall to all races, and he inspired a return of markets, shops, record stores, drug stores and other retail enterprises that had been driven from South Los Angeles by the 1965 fires of Watts. This year's flames--the fires of Rodney King--destroyed chain drug stores and supermarkets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1992 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thrifty Drug, the oldest and largest drugstore chain in Los Angeles, did not hesitate to rebuild the four outlets it lost to the fire and vandalism of the Watts riots in 1965--a decision, chain officials recall, that signaled their commitment to South Los Angeles and its residents. But Thrifty is not likely to undertake a second round of rebuilding in South Los Angeles now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1991 | BILL BOYARSKY
"It's like graffiti," said Sister Diane Donoghue, casting a disgusted look at the old tires, wine bottles and beer cans in the South Los Angeles lot. "You just can't let it sit there." So, on Saturday, Sept. 28, Sister Diane and residents of the working-class neighborhood southeast of downtown will clean up the big lot at 28th Street and Maple Avenue and remove the graffiti from the walls of an adjacent home. Extra help will come from members of the California Conservation Corps.
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