Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSouth Los Angeles Economy
IN THE NEWS

South Los Angeles Economy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 11, 1992 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Los Angeles--the epicenter of the deadly rioting--lagged far behind the rest of the county during the 1980s in nearly every measure of prosperity, and has a higher poverty rate now for its families than it had in 1965, according to new Census Bureau figures. The statistics underscore numerically the social problems that have plagued the area since the Watts riots more than a quarter century ago: joblessness, hopelessness and a crippling lack of skills and education.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1996 | BILL BOYARSKY
It sounded like a simple feel-good story about the groundbreaking for a new and desperately needed South Los Angeles food market to replace one that had been destroyed by a mysterious fire in 1994. But as I checked it out, the tale took a surprising turn into the labyrinth of moral ambiguity and complexity so often found in L.A. politics, especially when it involves rebuilding inner city neighborhoods that have been abandoned by most investors.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 25, 1991 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before Los Angeles and a private developer collaborated to put a major shopping mall within walking distance of her Baldwin Hills home, Deirdre Hill did her shopping across town. She still does--three years after the $120-million Baldwin Hills-Crenshaw Plaza first beckoned the affluent residents of the nearby hilltop neighborhoods. Hill said she still makes the trek because the May Co. and Broadway stores at the plaza failed to sufficiently upgrade their merchandise and facilities.
NEWS
May 11, 1992 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Los Angeles--the epicenter of the deadly rioting--lagged far behind the rest of the county during the 1980s in nearly every measure of prosperity, and has a higher poverty rate now for its families than it had in 1965, according to new Census Bureau figures. The statistics underscore numerically the social problems that have plagued the area since the Watts riots more than a quarter century ago: joblessness, hopelessness and a crippling lack of skills and education.
BUSINESS
November 27, 1991 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than three decades, business has staged a mass exodus from the mean streets of America's inner cities--driven by fear of crime, high operating costs and lack of skilled labor. But with many suburban and downtown retail markets nearly saturated--and with wages and real estate costs becoming increasingly attractive in depressed urban areas--some experts believe that basic economics favor a return to the inner city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1996 | BILL BOYARSKY
It sounded like a simple feel-good story about the groundbreaking for a new and desperately needed South Los Angeles food market to replace one that had been destroyed by a mysterious fire in 1994. But as I checked it out, the tale took a surprising turn into the labyrinth of moral ambiguity and complexity so often found in L.A. politics, especially when it involves rebuilding inner city neighborhoods that have been abandoned by most investors.
NEWS
November 26, 1991 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shortly after Wells Fargo Bank closed a branch office last year on West 43rd Place, joining the exodus of financial institutions out of South Los Angeles, a pawnshop moved onto the site and began doing a brisk business lending money to customers at annual interest rates of 42% and higher. The firm, 43rd Place Collateral Lenders, which sports a sophisticated computer system and a large, modern showroom, now makes an average of 70 loans a day.
NEWS
November 25, 1991 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is this any way to greet a customer? At the Kenneth Hahn Plaza in Willowbrook, a force of about 15 full-time, baton-carrying security guards patrol the grounds, watching out for potential troublemakers. A six-foot-high, wrought-iron fence--equipped with infrared motion detectors to thwart would-be fence hoppers--defends the perimeter. And if anyone gets caught shoplifting or purse snatching, they can be thrown into a holding tank right in the middle of the shopping center.
NEWS
May 14, 1995
A community development bank created to invigorate the south Los Angeles economy after the 1992 riots is offering a short-term financing program for small- and mid-sized manufacturing and service businesses anywhere in Los Angeles. The Southern California Business Development Corp., which was initiated by the city and funded by a group of local banks, already makes long-term loans to south Los Angeles businesses turned down by traditional banks.
OPINION
January 25, 2008
Labor agreements are usually private affairs, resulting from give-and-take bargaining between management and workers. Yet such accords often benefit the public at large, and rarely is that more clearly the case than in the recently concluded tentative agreement between commercial property managers and a union representing thousands of security officers. Security has become ever more important in the post-9/11 world.
BUSINESS
November 27, 1991 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than three decades, business has staged a mass exodus from the mean streets of America's inner cities--driven by fear of crime, high operating costs and lack of skilled labor. But with many suburban and downtown retail markets nearly saturated--and with wages and real estate costs becoming increasingly attractive in depressed urban areas--some experts believe that basic economics favor a return to the inner city.
NEWS
November 26, 1991 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shortly after Wells Fargo Bank closed a branch office last year on West 43rd Place, joining the exodus of financial institutions out of South Los Angeles, a pawnshop moved onto the site and began doing a brisk business lending money to customers at annual interest rates of 42% and higher. The firm, 43rd Place Collateral Lenders, which sports a sophisticated computer system and a large, modern showroom, now makes an average of 70 loans a day.
NEWS
November 25, 1991 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is this any way to greet a customer? At the Kenneth Hahn Plaza in Willowbrook, a force of about 15 full-time, baton-carrying security guards patrol the grounds, watching out for potential troublemakers. A six-foot-high, wrought-iron fence--equipped with infrared motion detectors to thwart would-be fence hoppers--defends the perimeter. And if anyone gets caught shoplifting or purse snatching, they can be thrown into a holding tank right in the middle of the shopping center.
NEWS
November 25, 1991 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before Los Angeles and a private developer collaborated to put a major shopping mall within walking distance of her Baldwin Hills home, Deirdre Hill did her shopping across town. She still does--three years after the $120-million Baldwin Hills-Crenshaw Plaza first beckoned the affluent residents of the nearby hilltop neighborhoods. Hill said she still makes the trek because the May Co. and Broadway stores at the plaza failed to sufficiently upgrade their merchandise and facilities.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY and MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. has teamed up with WATTSHealth Systems Inc. to launch the first private economic-development organization to help retain and lure businesses to South Los Angeles. South Los Angeles, which stretches from the Santa Monica Freeway to the Riverside Freeway, and from La Brea Avenue to the Alameda Corridor, had become one of the only remaining county swatches with no such private effort to improve its business climate.
NEWS
May 8, 2012 | By Robert Greene
Bobby Grace was beginning to sort through football scholarships from small colleges and was plotting his path from San Bernardino to the pros when his father sat him down for a difficult but honest talk. “Look,” Grace recently recalled his father saying, “you're 5-foot-7, 145 pounds. You're never going to the NFL. Education is going to be your key.” The message was hard for Grace to process at first, but he eventually saw that his father was right. He reconfigured his life plan and went to UCLA, where he focused not just on education but on activism and campus politics.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|