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South Los Angeles Reconstruction

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1992 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It had been eight months since the bottom fell out of Ron Evans' once-thriving South Los Angeles construction business, eight months of driving from one building site to the next without any luck in finding work. Three weeks ago, Evans' luck suddenly changed when he got a call from the Black Fund, one of several activist groups that use street protests to persuade contractors to hire more African-American workers in the rebuilding of riot-torn South Los Angeles.
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NEWS
October 31, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The massive earthquake that rocked houses and businesses off their foundations Jan. 17 also shook the tenuous and sometimes volatile relationship between San Fernando Valley and South Los Angeles lawmakers. The tension has been evident during a recent series of City Hall squabbles over how to divide limited recovery dollars between quake-ravaged Valley communities and South Los Angeles neighborhoods still reeling from the impact of the 1992 riots.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1992 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a South Los Angeles coalition began its petition drive to "Rebuild South Central Without Liquor Stores," they hoped to collect 1,000 signatures by Aug. 1. By midday Sunday--five weeks after they began--they had 25,700 names, and the numbers were climbing. "Keep liquor stores that were burned down from being rebuilt," volunteer Jacqueline Hills, 16, a high school student, called out to parishioners at the First African Methodist Episcopal Church as they left morning services.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1992 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last January, the federal agency regulating the nation's credit unions rejected with little fanfare an application to charter an unprecedented credit union serving 600,000 residents living in the 50-square-miles of southern Los Angeles. Officials with National Credit Union Administration's regional office in Concord at the time expressed concern over the "the appropriateness of the common bond which defines the community, and the economic vitality of the proposed institution."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1992 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposal to speed the rebuilding of businesses in riot-torn sections of the city--while maintaining close scrutiny of controversial operations such as liquor stores--was approved Wednesday by the Los Angeles City Council. The ordinance waives public hearings for businesses typically not opposed by neighbors, such as supermarkets and gas stations. It also defers Planning Department fees on all stores that are rebuilt.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1992 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last January, the federal agency regulating the nation's credit unions rejected with little fanfare an application to charter an unprecedented credit union serving 600,000 residents living in the 50-square-miles of southern Los Angeles. Officials with National Credit Union Administration's regional office in Concord at the time expressed concern over the "the appropriateness of the common bond which defines the community, and the economic vitality of the proposed institution."
NEWS
October 31, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The massive earthquake that rocked houses and businesses off their foundations Jan. 17 also shook the tenuous and sometimes volatile relationship between San Fernando Valley and South Los Angeles lawmakers. The tension has been evident during a recent series of City Hall squabbles over how to divide limited recovery dollars between quake-ravaged Valley communities and South Los Angeles neighborhoods still reeling from the impact of the 1992 riots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1992 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It had been eight months since the bottom fell out of Ron Evans' once-thriving South Los Angeles construction business, eight months of driving from one building site to the next without any luck in finding work. Three weeks ago, Evans' luck suddenly changed when he got a call from the Black Fund, one of several activist groups that use street protests to persuade contractors to hire more African-American workers in the rebuilding of riot-torn South Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1992 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a South Los Angeles coalition began its petition drive to "Rebuild South Central Without Liquor Stores," they hoped to collect 1,000 signatures by Aug. 1. By midday Sunday--five weeks after they began--they had 25,700 names, and the numbers were climbing. "Keep liquor stores that were burned down from being rebuilt," volunteer Jacqueline Hills, 16, a high school student, called out to parishioners at the First African Methodist Episcopal Church as they left morning services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1992 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposal to speed the rebuilding of businesses in riot-torn sections of the city--while maintaining close scrutiny of controversial operations such as liquor stores--was approved Wednesday by the Los Angeles City Council. The ordinance waives public hearings for businesses typically not opposed by neighbors, such as supermarkets and gas stations. It also defers Planning Department fees on all stores that are rebuilt.
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