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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1992
Police officers arriving at the scene of an apparent gang-related homicide in South Los Angeles were met by a barrage of rocks and bottles thrown from an angry crowd of about 100 friends of the dead man, authorities said Tuesday. No officers were injured in the disturbance late Monday night at 48th Place and Figueroa Street, which was broken up after about 1 1/2 hours by 40 officers in riot gear.
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NEWS
June 4, 1995
Police last week continued to search for a man wanted in connection with a south Los Angeles accident in which a car apparently drag-racing struck and killed a 7-year-old boy. Investigators are checking leads provided by witnesses to the May 18 accident that killed Dennis Diaz, said Los Angeles Police Officer Sonia Cabrera. The boy suffered massive head and upper-body injuries when he was struck while crossing 49th Street at Ascot Avenue about 8:45 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2002 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thanks to a 71-year-old former school custodian and the contributions of several philanthropic institutions and government agencies, South Los Angeles has its first community garden--an 8,000-square-foot plot straddling Vermont Avenue near the Coliseum where residents can grow food for their families. Helen Johnson is the true founder of the Vermont Square Community Garden, although she is quick to stress that it was the S.
NEWS
March 21, 1993 | ELSTON CARR
Making good on a promise to take a more active role in addressing social issues in urban areas, the National Football League has started extensive renovations of a commercial site for the NFL/Youth Education Town scheduled to open in June. The NFL facility, in the Gateway Plaza at Rosecrans and Central avenues in Compton, will include game rooms, a weight room and showers. A 10,000-square-foot Astroturf playing field will be installed next door.
NEWS
May 16, 1993 | ELSTON CARR
For 45 years, the Southeast Symphony Orchestra has filled church halls and school auditoriums in South Los Angeles with the sounds of classical music. The 40-member Southeast Symphony does not have a high degree of name recognition or much funding. But its supporters say the symphony provides a valuable place for African-American classical musicians to hone their skills while providing quality entertainment for area residents. "This is a wonderful opportunity for them to train.
NEWS
August 14, 1994 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
Perched on a picnic bench beneath a shade tree, community activist Charles Rachal told a group of listeners about what his park used to be: a common ground for neighbors to gather in harmony. "I used to be here at 9:30 in the morning to go to the pool," the former gang member said, pointing at a dried-out, grave-like pool at South Park. "It's a real frustrating situation . . . this park symbolized a safe ground." Rachal's audience Aug.
NEWS
August 14, 1994 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
Get educated: Travel. The opportunity to experience life outside of South Los Angeles was given last week to 40 lower-income area youngsters, who got a taste of life in Northern California for three days. "California is large," said Darwin Laidley, 12, from a telephone at Monterey's Fisherman's Wharf. "I've never seen these beautiful things before. There's more trees out here." The trip was sponsored by the Los Angeles Urban League through a donation from the private sector.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1992
Three children were critically injured in a fire at an apartment Friday night, the second blaze in a week in which residents of the area were trapped by so-called "burglar bars," authorities said. Los Angeles police officers and firefighters had to rip the bars off one of the front windows to rescue the children, Sgt. Stephen Faulk said. The blaze broke out at 7:45 p.m.
OPINION
May 31, 2004
Re "Safe in War, Sailor Slain at L.A. Club," May 26: The tragic murder of Brian Butler Jr. should remind readers of the unbearable costs of our war on terror as well as the narrowness of our definition of terror. As Congress approves billions of dollars to secure the streets of Fallouja in Iraq, 9th and Florence avenues remain as deadly as ever. No one should be so naive to think that simply throwing money at South L.A.'s myriad problems would create an inner-city utopia. But any reasonable person can see that if even a tiny fraction of the mounting cost of our Iraq war were devoted to improving the quality of housing, education and healthcare -- and increasing the presence of law enforcement -- the streets of South L.A. and the hundreds of U.S. communities like it would be far safer.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | DUKE HELFAND
For three decades, Marcine Shaw has been a pillar of the community. She helped establish group homes for gang members and the disabled. She brought organized sports and literacy programs to youths. And as senior deputy to former County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn, she cut through red tape to bring health care, food and other services to constituents in Willowbrook, Athens, Compton and other communities in the 2nd Supervisorial District.
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