Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSouth Pacific Culture
IN THE NEWS

South Pacific Culture

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 14, 1987 | DAVID LAMB, Times Staff Writer
A group of New Caledonians has an unusual solution for the political future of this French overseas territory where Melanesians are agitating for independence: They would make it America's 51st state. The statehood idea is being pushed, only half in jest, by the American Assn., an informal coalition of about 10,000 people, most of them French settlers who remember fondly the massive presence of U.S. servicemen in the South Pacific during World War II.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 29, 1989 | MARILYN OLIVER
While you're relaxing on the beach this summer, you may be surprised to see outrigger canoes crashing through the surf. No, you're not in Hawaii or Tahiti. You're just witnessing a popular Southland pastime, the ancient Polynesian sport of outrigger-canoe racing. "This is absolutely a growing sport, especially in Southern California," says Mike D'Alessio, president of KOA, the California Outrigger Assn.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 29, 1989 | MARILYN OLIVER
While you're relaxing on the beach this summer, you may be surprised to see outrigger canoes crashing through the surf. No, you're not in Hawaii or Tahiti. You're just witnessing a popular Southland pastime, the ancient Polynesian sport of outrigger-canoe racing. "This is absolutely a growing sport, especially in Southern California," says Mike D'Alessio, president of KOA, the California Outrigger Assn.
NEWS
July 14, 1987 | DAVID LAMB, Times Staff Writer
A group of New Caledonians has an unusual solution for the political future of this French overseas territory where Melanesians are agitating for independence: They would make it America's 51st state. The statehood idea is being pushed, only half in jest, by the American Assn., an informal coalition of about 10,000 people, most of them French settlers who remember fondly the massive presence of U.S. servicemen in the South Pacific during World War II.
NEWS
May 30, 2000 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of Fiji's military seized power Monday night and established martial law, saying he needed to restore order to a country that seemed to be quickly sliding toward mob rule 10 days after its top government leaders were taken hostage. Commodore Frank Bainimarama acted one day after an armed gang went on a rampage through the deserted center of Suva, the usually bustling capital, killing an unarmed police officer and wrecking the headquarters of the national television station.
NEWS
August 27, 1992 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the ever-shrinking cultural network of the global village, genuinely exotic ethnic music is getting rarer by the year. It takes a crusader zeal to explore new ethnomusicological traditions. And it was the pursuit of such cultural treasures that took Ojai resident Pascal Nabet-meyer, recording equipment in tow, to the remote island of Rapa last year. The results of his field-recording is an album by the Tahitian Choir called "Rapa Iti," recently released on the Triloka label.
TRAVEL
May 18, 2008 | Amanda Jones, Special to The Times
Fiji is one of those island daydreams you can't believe still exists. The ocean is warm, turquoise, clean, and little in it stings or bites. The people are exuberantly welcoming, the drinking water is filtered. The food is safe and, in the upscale places, worthy of Michelin stars. Despite a spate of recent development, it's no Bora Bora, where development stacks upon development.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|