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South Park Ca

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1993 | BILL BOYARSKY
The portion of Los Angeles stretching from the edge of Downtown to 84th Street in South-Central L.A. doesn't look like much. Well-kept bungalows built in the 1920s recall when this neighborhood was the thriving heart of working-class L.A. The scene, though, is blighted by vacant lots and boarded-up houses that appear on just about every block. Only a few factories remain in the area, the remnant of a once-mighty industrial center. Drugs and gangs make the streets dangerous.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The underdog bid by the historic Los Angeles Coliseum to become home to a new NFL franchise increasingly looks like a contender, as a group of business leaders with a competing proposal for a football stadium next to the Convention Center agreed Thursday to keep their plan under wraps until the Coliseum's fate is determined, and league officials this week promised to give serious consideration to the Coliseum proposal. Retired Arco Chairman Lodwrick M. Cook and consultant Sheldon I.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1988 | Scott Harris, Times Staff Writer
Michelle Barker, a hospital public relations director, works, shops and, most importantly, lives in downtown Los Angeles. Her home is on the sunny side of the financial district, a tasteful $190,000 condo midway up a 14-story building called the Skyline, complete with gym and racquetball court. She and her fellow urban pioneers call their neighborhood "South Park." Nine blocks south, Rosario and Maria Valdez and their six children, ages 11 to three months, also live in South Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1993 | BILL BOYARSKY
The portion of Los Angeles stretching from the edge of Downtown to 84th Street in South-Central L.A. doesn't look like much. Well-kept bungalows built in the 1920s recall when this neighborhood was the thriving heart of working-class L.A. The scene, though, is blighted by vacant lots and boarded-up houses that appear on just about every block. Only a few factories remain in the area, the remnant of a once-mighty industrial center. Drugs and gangs make the streets dangerous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The underdog bid by the historic Los Angeles Coliseum to become home to a new NFL franchise increasingly looks like a contender, as a group of business leaders with a competing proposal for a football stadium next to the Convention Center agreed Thursday to keep their plan under wraps until the Coliseum's fate is determined, and league officials this week promised to give serious consideration to the Coliseum proposal. Retired Arco Chairman Lodwrick M. Cook and consultant Sheldon I.
NEWS
March 22, 1989 | MYRNA OLIVER, Times Staff Writer
After working late, lawyers Christian E. Markey Jr. and his wife, Mickey Byrnes, often slip into an outdoor Jacuzzi and stare up peacefully at a "lighted forest" of skyscrapers looming overhead.
NEWS
March 22, 1989 | MYRNA OLIVER, Times Staff Writer
After working late, lawyers Christian E. Markey Jr. and his wife, Mickey Byrnes, often slip into an outdoor Jacuzzi and stare up peacefully at a "lighted forest" of skyscrapers looming overhead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1988 | Scott Harris, Times Staff Writer
Michelle Barker, a hospital public relations director, works, shops and, most importantly, lives in downtown Los Angeles. Her home is on the sunny side of the financial district, a tasteful $190,000 condo midway up a 14-story building called the Skyline, complete with gym and racquetball court. She and her fellow urban pioneers call their neighborhood "South Park." Nine blocks south, Rosario and Maria Valdez and their six children, ages 11 to three months, also live in South Park.
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