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NEWS
August 24, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two longtime Los Angeles business and civic leaders became the latest players to enter Southern California's increasingly crowded and complex football stadium derby Friday, unveiling a plan for a $300-million-plus showpiece next to the proposed downtown site of a new sports arena. In an interview with The Times, retired Arco Chairman Lodwrick M. Cook and businessman Sheldon Ausman--who headed L.A.'
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NEWS
August 24, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two longtime Los Angeles business and civic leaders became the latest players to enter Southern California's increasingly crowded and complex football stadium derby Friday, unveiling a plan for a $300-million-plus showpiece next to the proposed downtown site of a new sports arena. In an interview with The Times, retired Arco Chairman Lodwrick M. Cook and businessman Sheldon Ausman--who headed L.A.'
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1997 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Indicating a possible fissure in the united front that politicians have sought to portray over the last year, the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce failed this week to approve a resolution backing the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum as the top choice for the return of pro football to the Los Angeles area.
SPORTS
March 28, 2002 | SAM FARMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least three years have passed since Sheldon Ausman last looked at the architectural drawings. He retrieved them from storage this week and unfurled them like scrolls, spreading them across the desk of his Century City office. Before him lay the forgotten plans for a state-of-the-art NFL stadium in the South Park area of downtown Los Angeles, a dream derailed when the city cast its lot with the New Coliseum.
NEWS
January 12, 1997 | JODI WILGOREN and TIM RUTTEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
History has its own surprising symmetries, and one of them seems to be coming into focus in the aftermath of Peter O'Malley's stunning announcement that he is putting his family's business, the Los Angeles Dodgers, up for sale. The Dodgers moved from Brooklyn to the West Coast in 1958 on the strength of baseball's new economics, L.A.'s centralized, can-do, growth-at-any-cost politics and the late Walter O'Malley's relentless opportunism.
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