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South Park Television Program

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2006 | From the Associated Press
"South Park," already busy with controversy at home (see the Channel Island column, Page E26), is also stirring things up Down Under. New Zealand television network C4 apologized Thursday for showing an episode of the show that featured a bleeding statue of the Virgin Mary. The show, titled "Bloody Mary," was screened in early February. Because of the strong reaction, C4 said it would not rerun the episode.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2009 | Chris Lee
Has "South Park" brought Kanye's West's ego in for a landing? On Wednesday, Comedy Central's series lampooned the notoriously grandiose rapper-producer as a hissy-fit-prone dandy, so self-absorbed that when he fails to "get" a joke he flies into a murderous rage. A humbled West took to his blog to respond (in emphatic capital letters): "SOUTH PARK MURDERED ME LAST NIGHT AND IT'S PRETTY FUNNY. IT HURTS MY FEELINGS BUT WHAT CAN YOU EXPECT FROM SOUTH PARK! I ACTUALLY HAVE BEEN WORKING ON MY EGO THOUGH.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2006 | From the Associated Press
"South Park" creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone weren't sure the series would last beyond its initial order of six episodes. But the irreverent comedy show, which first aired Aug. 13, 1997, begins a new season Oct. 4. So how long can they keep it going? "We've said in a lot of interviews, 'There's no way we're going to be 35 or 40 doing this show,' and here we are at 35, and we're doing the show," Stone said. "Now we'll say, 'There's no way we're going to be 45 to 50 doing this show.'
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2006 | From the Associated Press
"South Park" creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone weren't sure the series would last beyond its initial order of six episodes. But the irreverent comedy show, which first aired Aug. 13, 1997, begins a new season Oct. 4. So how long can they keep it going? "We've said in a lot of interviews, 'There's no way we're going to be 35 or 40 doing this show,' and here we are at 35, and we're doing the show," Stone said. "Now we'll say, 'There's no way we're going to be 45 to 50 doing this show.'
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2000 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fans of Comedy Central's "South Park" will get 30 new episodes of the animated show, and fans of "South Park" creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone will get a new series from the duo in 2001, Comedy Central announced Monday. By the end of the three-year deal, Parker said, he and Stone will have 102 episodes of "South Park" under their belts, at which point the slapstick adventures of Kyle, Kenny, Cartman and Stan will come to an end.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2009 | Chris Lee
Has "South Park" brought Kanye's West's ego in for a landing? On Wednesday, Comedy Central's series lampooned the notoriously grandiose rapper-producer as a hissy-fit-prone dandy, so self-absorbed that when he fails to "get" a joke he flies into a murderous rage. A humbled West took to his blog to respond (in emphatic capital letters): "SOUTH PARK MURDERED ME LAST NIGHT AND IT'S PRETTY FUNNY. IT HURTS MY FEELINGS BUT WHAT CAN YOU EXPECT FROM SOUTH PARK! I ACTUALLY HAVE BEEN WORKING ON MY EGO THOUGH.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2001 | T.L. STANLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There were heady times, in the late '90s, when the exploits of the lewd and lovable "South Park" kids were de rigueur water-cooler conversation, peppered with catch phrases from the most recent episode. The uninitiated got an earful, and a mandate: "You must see this show." There were stratospheric ratings in cable terms, when 6.2 million people watched Cartman sift through his mom's sordid sex life in search of his father at the show's peak in spring '98.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1998 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A staple on nearly every episode of the hit cable TV cartoon show "South Park" is the death of the hapless Kenny character by any means possible. That kind of crude humor--along with scenes that feature Jesus boxing Satan--offends many parents and educators who fret that the cartoon is luring unsuspecting kids into its fold. The show carries a TV-MA (mature audiences) rating. But "South Park" undoubtedly is clicking with fans who've purchased 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometimes, the road to the American dream is paved with flaming flatulence and singing poo. At least, it has been for Trey Parker, 28, and Matt Stone, 26, creators of "South Park"--the scatological animated series that has set these Colorado college chums on the path to riches and become the signature show of cable's Comedy Central network.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2006 | From the Associated Press
"South Park," already busy with controversy at home (see the Channel Island column, Page E26), is also stirring things up Down Under. New Zealand television network C4 apologized Thursday for showing an episode of the show that featured a bleeding statue of the Virgin Mary. The show, titled "Bloody Mary," was screened in early February. Because of the strong reaction, C4 said it would not rerun the episode.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2001 | T.L. STANLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There were heady times, in the late '90s, when the exploits of the lewd and lovable "South Park" kids were de rigueur water-cooler conversation, peppered with catch phrases from the most recent episode. The uninitiated got an earful, and a mandate: "You must see this show." There were stratospheric ratings in cable terms, when 6.2 million people watched Cartman sift through his mom's sordid sex life in search of his father at the show's peak in spring '98.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2000 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fans of Comedy Central's "South Park" will get 30 new episodes of the animated show, and fans of "South Park" creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone will get a new series from the duo in 2001, Comedy Central announced Monday. By the end of the three-year deal, Parker said, he and Stone will have 102 episodes of "South Park" under their belts, at which point the slapstick adventures of Kyle, Kenny, Cartman and Stan will come to an end.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1998 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A staple on nearly every episode of the hit cable TV cartoon show "South Park" is the death of the hapless Kenny character by any means possible. That kind of crude humor--along with scenes that feature Jesus boxing Satan--offends many parents and educators who fret that the cartoon is luring unsuspecting kids into its fold. The show carries a TV-MA (mature audiences) rating. But "South Park" undoubtedly is clicking with fans who've purchased 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometimes, the road to the American dream is paved with flaming flatulence and singing poo. At least, it has been for Trey Parker, 28, and Matt Stone, 26, creators of "South Park"--the scatological animated series that has set these Colorado college chums on the path to riches and become the signature show of cable's Comedy Central network.
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