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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1999
City officials next week plan to divert traffic from their busy streets to neighboring South Pasadena, which has led opposition to the 6.2-mile 710 Freeway extension because it would cut through the middle of town. The plan includes blocking southbound traffic from Fremont Avenue at Alhambra Road while cars heading north toward South Pasadena will get through. Fremont handles an estimated 31,000 vehicles daily.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2001
The South Pasadena City Council on Wednesday agreed to close two streets that intersect with the Pasadena Blue Line, removing a potential obstacle that could have delayed the light-rail project. The California Public Utilities Commission, which oversees crossings of rail lines, had requested the closures. Commission staff members had informed the city that if the streets weren't closed, a grade separation would have to be built at another site in South Pasadena.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1999 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After suffering vociferous complaints from commuters and some local businesses, Alhambra officials announced Thursday that they were taking down the traffic barricades they put up earlier this week near the Long Beach Freeway. Instead, city officials say they will attempt a less provocative way to deal with traffic from South Pasadena: re-timing signal lights on the major routes leading to and from the freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2000
A bill that would allow South Pasadena to veto construction of the Long Beach Freeway extension won approval Monday from the state Assembly Transportation Committee. Senate Bill 1497, introduced by State Sen. Adam Schiff (D-Pasadena), passed 13-1. It would require Caltrans to get the approval of South Pasadena, a longtime opponent of the plan, before extending the freeway from the Foothill to San Bernardino freeways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2000 | RICHARD WINTON and MANUEL GAMIZ JR., SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Leaders from several San Gabriel Valley cities warned Thursday that without the construction of the Long Beach Freeway extension, the region will not be able to comply with the Clean Air Act and could lose federal funding for other transportation projects. But later in the day, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency officials discounted that claim, saying that no single project would make such a significant difference to regional air quality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1995
In the latest chapter of the saga-like debate over the Long Beach (710) Freeway extension, the House of Representatives has said that a "multimode/low-build alternative" should be studied to minimize impact on the neighborhoods bisected by roaring traffic. Lawmakers are considering ways to bypass building the litigation-riddled 6.2-mile extension through El Sereno, Pasadena and South Pasadena.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1994
Gov. Pete Wilson removed another major obstacle to the long-delayed Long Beach Freeway extension Friday by signing a bill that eliminates the need for South Pasadena to approve the eight-lane highway's passage through the city. For nearly four decades, the San Gabriel Valley city has refused to approve the extension linking the San Bernardino and Foothill freeways because it would split its city in half, threaten 1,000 homes and 6,000 trees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1997
The state Assembly majority leader has urged Vice President Al Gore to delay a pending final decision on the Long Beach Freeway extension through South Pasadena, Pasadena and El Sereno. Assemblyman Antonio R. Villaraigosa (D-Los Angeles), a longtime opponent of the project, in an Oct. 30 letter requested that Gore ask federal highway officials to delay a decision. Last month, highway officials presented a draft proposal to local officials that called for the 6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1997 | From Times staff reports
South Pasadena officials Friday reasserted their decades-long opposition to the proposed extension of the Long Beach Freeway, telling the Federal Highway Administration that the project would be environmentally and fiscally flawed. The city's comments were in a letter responding to a draft plan for the 6.2-mile freeway project unveiled in September by the agency. Federal officials have said they will decide within weeks whether to proceed with the $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1992
Why has the Ram organization, from top management to the players, become so inept? Because Georgia Frontiere and John Shaw do not understand football. The Rams will continue to be losers until Georgia sells them or complete control is turned over to someone who understands football. John Shaw will never be that person. Will such control be given to Chuck Knox, someone who does understand football? Stay tuned. MARK SUTTON Walnut
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2000 | RICHARD WINTON and MANUEL GAMIZ JR., SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Leaders from several San Gabriel Valley cities warned Thursday that without the construction of the Long Beach Freeway extension, the region will not be able to comply with the Clean Air Act and could lose federal funding for other transportation projects. But later in the day, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency officials discounted that claim, saying that no single project would make such a significant difference to regional air quality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2000
City Council members say they will reconsider a plea from Fletcher Avenue residents to install the city's first speed humps on the street. They rejected such a request five months ago. The council this week heard a city-hired traffic consultant's proposal to install three 8-foot-wide traffic islands in the middle of the avenue to force speeding drivers to slow down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1999 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After suffering vociferous complaints from commuters and some local businesses, Alhambra officials announced Thursday that they were taking down the traffic barricades they put up earlier this week near the Long Beach Freeway. Instead, city officials say they will attempt a less provocative way to deal with traffic from South Pasadena: re-timing signal lights on the major routes leading to and from the freeway.
NEWS
July 20, 1999 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 35-year feud between Alhambra and neighboring South Pasadena over the proposed extension of the Long Beach Freeway is spilling out of the courtroom into an all-out street brawl. Beginning this morning, Alhambra city officials plan to divert traffic off their streets to relieve chronic gridlock around the unfinished freeway, Interstate 710, a traffic maneuver that South Pasadena leaders say might flood their streets with thousands of unwanted cars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1999
City officials next week plan to divert traffic from their busy streets to neighboring South Pasadena, which has led opposition to the 6.2-mile 710 Freeway extension because it would cut through the middle of town. The plan includes blocking southbound traffic from Fremont Avenue at Alhambra Road while cars heading north toward South Pasadena will get through. Fremont handles an estimated 31,000 vehicles daily.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1997
The state Assembly majority leader has urged Vice President Al Gore to delay a pending final decision on the Long Beach Freeway extension through South Pasadena, Pasadena and El Sereno. Assemblyman Antonio R. Villaraigosa (D-Los Angeles), a longtime opponent of the project, in an Oct. 30 letter requested that Gore ask federal highway officials to delay a decision. Last month, highway officials presented a draft proposal to local officials that called for the 6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1990 | JAMES QUINN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In their first chance to get at cash from the new 5-cent gasoline tax increase, officials of Southern California communities Tuesday proposed new highway projects costing far more than will be available under the voter-approved measure. The wish list presented to the California Transportation Commission at a hearing in Los Angeles included freeway-widening projects that officials said were unneeded as recently as five years ago but are now deemed essential to relieve congestion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1996
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority board gave final approval Wednesday to a streamlined design for the Blue Line, casting in concrete plans for the 13.7-mile light-rail line from Los Angeles to eastern Pasadena expected to open in 2001.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1997 | From Times staff reports
South Pasadena officials Friday reasserted their decades-long opposition to the proposed extension of the Long Beach Freeway, telling the Federal Highway Administration that the project would be environmentally and fiscally flawed. The city's comments were in a letter responding to a draft plan for the 6.2-mile freeway project unveiled in September by the agency. Federal officials have said they will decide within weeks whether to proceed with the $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1997 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As Federal Highway Administration officials move toward deciding whether to extend the Long Beach Freeway, South Pasadena--which has fought the roadway for more than 30 years--has missed what was to have been the final deadline to comment on the project. The agency set Friday as the deadline for cities affected by the project to comment. South Pasadena was the only municipality that failed to send in its remarks. Instead, South Pasadena asked the highway agency for more time.
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