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South Pasadena High School

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1998
South Pasadena High School has been rated as fourth-best school in the nation when it comes to getting best education for the fewest bucks. The finding is part of a study of 13,927 public school districts nationwide by SchoolMatch, a Westerville, Ohio, firm that advises parents on school choice. The firm created a percentile for school performance with the 100th percentile being the highest value.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1997 | Cecilia Rasmussen
Drug abuse and school violence often are cited as two of the most virulent symptoms of contemporary America's alleged moral decay. But contrary to popular perceptions, the primer on both was not written on the bloody playgrounds of the South Bronx nor in the decaying classrooms adjoining Chicago's sprawling housing projects nor on the mean streets outside gang-ridden schools in South-Central or East Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1996 | MAYRAV SAAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Under their breath, Jennifer Elaine Halferty's younger sisters occasionally chide the 17-year-old for being a "perfect princess," but on Tuesday her adoring siblings could publicly call the Polytechnic School student a "queen." Squinting at first in the garish early morning sunlight, Jennifer's hazel eyes popped wide open as Tournament of Roses President William Johnstone Jr. proclaimed her the 79th rose queen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1996
Compton and South Pasadena recently have been the subjects of multiple scandals involving public officials that have tarnished their municipal images. The latest Compton official in the news was former City Council member Patricia Moore, convicted this week in a bribery scandal; the schools are in receivership and former U.S. Rep. and Mayor Walter Tucker is in prison after being convicted of extortion and fraud.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1996
A parent volunteer was arrested on charges of grand theft and burglary at a fund-raising event for South Pasadena High School, police said. At the time of his arrest, Richard Carmona, 47 of Los Angeles had "several pockets" filled with $2,055 in bills that had been marked by the South Pasadena Police Department, said Lt. Doug Brown. Carmona is free on $50,000 bail. No criminal charges have been filed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1996
The district attorney's office said Wednesday that it will seek to try a 14-year-old boy as an adult on two counts of attempted murder. Police arrested the boy and two of his friends Saturday after an investigation into a Friday night shooting at South Pasadena High School that injured two people. Several shots were fired from the second floor of a house 200 to 300 yards away into a crowd of about 150 spectators at a girls' "powder puff" football game, police said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1996 | From a Times staff writer
Police searched Saturday for suspects and a motive in a shooting that left a 16-year-old girl and a 48-year-old man wounded on a South Pasadena High School football field where they were attending a post-game celebration. The girl, with a bullet wound in the calf, was treated at Huntington Memorial Hospital and released. The man, father of a South Pasadena High student, underwent surgery at Huntington for an abdominal wound and was listed in fair condition. Neither victim's name was released.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1996 | From a Times staff writer
Police arrested a 14-year-old boy Saturday in connection with a shooting on a South Pasadena High School football field that left two people wounded during a postgame celebration. The youth, whose name was not released, was being held at the South Pasadena jail as police sought two more suspects, both minors, said South Pasadena police Officer Rick Heltebrake. No other details about the suspect were released. One of the victims, a 16-year-old girl, suffered a bullet wound in the calf.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1995 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Members of Congress have nothing on April Reese, a newly minted graduate of South Pasadena High School, when it comes to grasping the bottom line in the Washington budget deficit battle. "No one wants to be cut . . . everyone wants to be happy," Reese said. That truism was a key lesson learned from a daunting civics class assignment--to balance the federal budget using a new computer simulation. Rather than listen to lectures that teacher Jeff Cox acknowledged were superficial, the students had to choose from thousands of line items and decide which ones to slash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1995
It's shorter than Newt's budget. It cuts more bucks than Newt's budget. It's April Reese's budget. Say who? The 18-year-old senior at South Pasadena High School devised a budget that cuts the national deficit by $30 billion, nearly twice the amount proposed by Congress. The budget proposal was one of 15 worked up by the school's students in civics class. Rep. Carlos J. Moorhead (R-Glendale) has promised to deliver the proposals to House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.).
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