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South Pasadena Taxpayers Assn

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NEWS
June 15, 1989
The comments in local newspapers by opponents of Proposition A, South Pasadena's school tax measure that fell short of the two-thirds majority required for passage, are nothing short of incredible. They are claiming victory. They are incredibly wrong. The members of the South Pasadena Taxpayers Assn. have successfully fought or supported five different ballot measures in the past five years. We think we can recognize a victory when we see one. All of these elections were of the 50%-plus-one-vote variety.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1994
Your editorial (May 8) regarding a special library tax in South Pasadena deserves rebuttal. While the state did reduce about $900,000 in funds over a two-year period, the city implemented new sources of revenue (taxes and fees) that greatly exceeded this shortfall: a 5% utility tax, a 54% minimum increase in water rates, a new street lighting and landscaping assessment district, and a substantial increase in fees. A conservative figure for the increased revenue would be $1.7 million per year.
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NEWS
August 22, 1993
The South Pasadena Taxpayers Assn. was quoted (Aug. 12) as advocating a wage and/or benefit package cut for the South Pasadena Police Department. This statement is out of context, as the SPTA is on record with the city suggesting a 5% pay cut for all department heads, coupled with a 2.5% pay cut for all other city employees. Not just the police! While we indeed stated that the South Pasadena police and fire benefit-to-wage ratio of 62%, that is, 62 cents for every dollar of wages, is outrageous and needs to be reduced, the news item singled out and named only the Police Department.
NEWS
August 22, 1993
The South Pasadena Taxpayers Assn. was quoted (Aug. 12) as advocating a wage and/or benefit package cut for the South Pasadena Police Department. This statement is out of context, as the SPTA is on record with the city suggesting a 5% pay cut for all department heads, coupled with a 2.5% pay cut for all other city employees. Not just the police! While we indeed stated that the South Pasadena police and fire benefit-to-wage ratio of 62%, that is, 62 cents for every dollar of wages, is outrageous and needs to be reduced, the news item singled out and named only the Police Department.
NEWS
April 13, 1989
How do you reward a city manager who has been so ineffective that he has lost the services of every department head in a period of four years? Some departments had multiple replacements during that brief span. Efficient management personnel have either resigned or been fired. Here is the reward the South Pasadena City Council came up with at its April 5 meeting. All but one council member praised the city manager. A huge scroll with John R. Bernardi inscribed in vivid green lettering was presented to him. He said he was "speechless."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1994
Your editorial (May 8) regarding a special library tax in South Pasadena deserves rebuttal. While the state did reduce about $900,000 in funds over a two-year period, the city implemented new sources of revenue (taxes and fees) that greatly exceeded this shortfall: a 5% utility tax, a 54% minimum increase in water rates, a new street lighting and landscaping assessment district, and a substantial increase in fees. A conservative figure for the increased revenue would be $1.7 million per year.
NEWS
June 22, 1989
A citizens watchdog group has criticized a City Council plan to hire a North Hollywood public relations firm to represent the city in its fight to stop the completion of the Long Beach Freeway. City Manager John Bernardi has been authorized by the council to contract with Glazer & Associates for up $1,000 a month to publicize the reasons for the city's opposition to a state Department of Transportation plan to run the last leg of the freeway through the middle of the city. The firm would conduct a campaign aimed at the media, community leaders and the public.
NEWS
November 5, 1987 | EDMUND NEWTON, Times Staff Writer
Following voters' decisive defeat of a proposed 4% utility tax, city officials are glumly assessing their options in the face of a projected budget shortfall of at least $90,000. Among the hard choices they face, said City Manager John Bernardi, is the possible layoff of city workers. "There's not a lot of fat anyplace," he said at a somber post-election gathering late Tuesday. "That's what makes it so hard. We're already operating with one-person departments."
NEWS
June 13, 1993
A local taxpayers group is challenging a city rule requiring opponents of proposed new fees to show identification when filing a protest. City Manager Ken Farfsing said he had asked the city attorney to take another look at the law relating to identification requirement, after receiving a complaint from the South Pasadena Taxpayers Assn. However, Farfsing said, he and City Atty. Edward Lee had drawn up the requirement and believe it is reasonable. "There is no law against it," said Farfsing.
NEWS
June 20, 1993
I just can't believe it. South Pasadena is requiring the property owners in that city who wish to protest two proposed assessment districts to accompany their mailed protest with a "copy of driver's license or some other form of official identification with sample of signature on the face of the document to verify the signature on the written protest." Further, the landscaping and lighting protests will be accepted during the protest hearing July 21, but the fire suppression protests must be filed no later than 5:30 p.m. before the hearing.
NEWS
June 20, 1993
I just can't believe it. South Pasadena is requiring the property owners in that city who wish to protest two proposed assessment districts to accompany their mailed protest with a "copy of driver's license or some other form of official identification with sample of signature on the face of the document to verify the signature on the written protest." Further, the landscaping and lighting protests will be accepted during the protest hearing July 21, but the fire suppression protests must be filed no later than 5:30 p.m. before the hearing.
NEWS
June 13, 1993
A local taxpayers group is challenging a city rule requiring opponents of proposed new fees to show identification when filing a protest. City Manager Ken Farfsing said he had asked the city attorney to take another look at the law relating to identification requirement, after receiving a complaint from the South Pasadena Taxpayers Assn. However, Farfsing said, he and City Atty. Edward Lee had drawn up the requirement and believe it is reasonable. "There is no law against it," said Farfsing.
NEWS
July 27, 1989
You've been reading about the South Pasadena Taxpayers Assn. and my comments concerning management and tax reform in South Pasadena. As an interested citizen, let me explain who they are and what they seek. The SPTA is not an anti-tax group. They supported the utility and school board tax issues. They believe in paying taxes to adequately fund local municipal government and schools for the services that are provided. They are for sensible taxation. If we allow taxes to increase faster than income, taxes will eventually exceed income.
NEWS
June 22, 1989
A citizens watchdog group has criticized a City Council plan to hire a North Hollywood public relations firm to represent the city in its fight to stop the completion of the Long Beach Freeway. City Manager John Bernardi has been authorized by the council to contract with Glazer & Associates for up $1,000 a month to publicize the reasons for the city's opposition to a state Department of Transportation plan to run the last leg of the freeway through the middle of the city. The firm would conduct a campaign aimed at the media, community leaders and the public.
NEWS
June 15, 1989
The comments in local newspapers by opponents of Proposition A, South Pasadena's school tax measure that fell short of the two-thirds majority required for passage, are nothing short of incredible. They are claiming victory. They are incredibly wrong. The members of the South Pasadena Taxpayers Assn. have successfully fought or supported five different ballot measures in the past five years. We think we can recognize a victory when we see one. All of these elections were of the 50%-plus-one-vote variety.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | EDMUND NEWTON, Times Staff Writer
Stunned supporters of a proposed parcel tax to aid the city's schools were picking through the wreckage of their failed campaign Wednesday, trying to explain the "silent opposition" that defeated them at the polls. Despite virtual across-the-board support from the city's Establishment, Proposition A, which would have imposed a $98-a-year parcel tax for five years, fell more than four percentage points short of the two-thirds majority it needed in Tuesday's special election. The final count was 2,851 for the tax and 1,728 against it, or 62.3% to 37.7%.
NEWS
July 27, 1989
You've been reading about the South Pasadena Taxpayers Assn. and my comments concerning management and tax reform in South Pasadena. As an interested citizen, let me explain who they are and what they seek. The SPTA is not an anti-tax group. They supported the utility and school board tax issues. They believe in paying taxes to adequately fund local municipal government and schools for the services that are provided. They are for sensible taxation. If we allow taxes to increase faster than income, taxes will eventually exceed income.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | EDMUND NEWTON, Times Staff Writer
Stunned supporters of a proposed parcel tax to aid the city's schools were picking through the wreckage of their failed campaign Wednesday, trying to explain the "silent opposition" that defeated them at the polls. Despite virtual across-the-board support from the city's Establishment, Proposition A, which would have imposed a $98-a-year parcel tax for five years, fell more than four percentage points short of the two-thirds majority it needed in Tuesday's special election. The final count was 2,851 for the tax and 1,728 against it, or 62.3% to 37.7%.
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | EDMUND NEWTON, Times Staff Writer
Say tax in this fiscally conservative city and, most of the time, get ready to duck. But Proposition A, a proposed education parcel tax that will be considered by the voters in a special election Tuesday, is different. Instead of clamorous protest, it is attracting harmonious across-the-board support, with everybody from PTA presidents to traditional tax-bashing organizations praising the measure. "I think it's significant that factions in this community who never agreed on anything in the past are all throwing their support behind this initiative," said Jessica Katz, a mother of two students who is managing the campaign for Proposition A. The proposal would impose a $98-a-year tax on each parcel in the city for five years.
NEWS
April 13, 1989
How do you reward a city manager who has been so ineffective that he has lost the services of every department head in a period of four years? Some departments had multiple replacements during that brief span. Efficient management personnel have either resigned or been fired. Here is the reward the South Pasadena City Council came up with at its April 5 meeting. All but one council member praised the city manager. A huge scroll with John R. Bernardi inscribed in vivid green lettering was presented to him. He said he was "speechless."
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