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NEWS
April 30, 1989 | GEORGE ESPER, Associated Press
The war was still raging that day 15 years ago when Vietnamese nuns heard the cries of a baby boy stuffed in a garbage can and took him inside their orphanage to raise. Today, Nguyen Thanh Binh, the son of a black American who went home and a Vietnamese mother who abandoned him, shares the plight of thousands of Amerasian youths languishing in the decay of Vietnam, desperately trying to get out and find their fathers. "My circumstances are miserable," says Lam Anh Hong, 18, whose mother gave her away to a relative.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Anh Do
When a city councilman in Irvine dreamed up the idea of forming a relationship with a coastal town in Vietnam, the leaders of this increasingly multicultural community got a quick, decisive lesson in foreign relations. Hundreds of Vietnamese Americans, many with wrenching stories of fleeing their homeland as communist forces took over the country, arrived by the busload at City Hall to tell city leaders they felt insulted and betrayed. By the time Tuesday's council meeting ended six hours later, city officials not only had dropped plans for a "friendship" pact with Nha Trang, they also had voted 3 to 2 to suspend Irvine's entire Friendship Cities Program.
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NEWS
November 26, 1989 | From National Geographic
Almost 15 years have passed since a North Vietnamese army tank forced the gate of Saigon's Independence Palace, signaling the defeat of South Vietnam and the unification of the two countries under communism. Today, the sound of war still faintly reverberates throughout Saigon, now officially known as Ho Chi Minh City, where the Communist victory is tainted by what is, for many, a futile quest for prosperity. "Could it be that quite a few things here really haven't changed all that much?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Anh Do
Of all the places in the world, why did Larry Agran have to choose Vietnam? That's what local Vietnamese Americans wondered after learning that the longtime Irvine councilman hoped to forge a relationship between the master-planned community and Nha Trang, a southern coastal city in Vietnam known for its beaches and scuba diving. To many who fled the country after it fell to communist forces, Agran's proposal seemed designed to cause hurt, and hundreds indicated they planned to confront Agran on Tuesday, when he was expected to propose that Irvine and Nha Trang form a "friendship city" relationship.
NATIONAL
February 18, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A bill in the General Assembly promoting the flag of the former South Vietnam died in a subcommittee after federal officials warned lawmakers that it could damage relations between the U.S. and Vietnam. The measure sparked concern among U.S. and Vietnamese officials after it passed the state House of Delegates last month. State Department officials urged several legislators to kill the bill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1994
The former commander-in-chief of the South Vietnamese Army and former president of the Republic of Vietnam, Gen. Nguyen Khanh, is scheduled to address the Orange County Forum, a public affairs organization. His talk, titled "The Economic War for Vietnam," is expected to focus on the possibility of Vietnam becoming a colony of China if the United States does not immediately invest in its economy. Khanh was born in South Vietnam in 1927.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2000
Robert W. "Blowtorch Bob" Komer, 78, Army and CIA veteran sent to South Vietnam in 1967 to run the pacification program. That program, described as the battle for the hearts and minds of the Vietnamese people, ran parallel to the U.S. military effort. President Lyndon B. Johnson, who had named Komer a year earlier as a presidential assistant to energize the shooting war, also gave him the pacification post. William E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2006 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
One of the most arresting images from the last days of the Vietnam War shows an unruly crowd rushing the door of a plane in Nha Trang, a rural seaside city north of Saigon. The focal point of the photograph is a balding, middle-aged American who is landing a jab to the head of a Vietnamese man desperate to board. The American is all grim determination; his jaw is clenched as he lunges right, extending his arm like a ramrod into the face of the intruder.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2013 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
The gig: David Tran, 68, founded hot sauce company Huy Fong Foods Inc. in Chinatown in 1980 and a few years later introduced Sriracha sauce to the U.S. His Sriracha, a version of a hot sauce originating in Si Racha, Thailand, quickly spread through the San Gabriel Valley and eventually the nation. The fiery red concoction in the clear bottle with the distinctive green cap and rooster logo has since gone mainstream: Google "Sriracha" and you'll find such things as cookbooks, water bottles, iPhone cases and T-shirts.
NEWS
December 19, 1989
Frederick E. Nolting Jr., 78, a career diplomat and former U.S. ambassador to South Vietnam. Nolting joined the U.S. Department of State in 1946 and then entered the foreign service. Before being sent to Saigon, he was a political officer at the U.S. Embassy in Paris, deputy U.S. representative to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and alternate U.S. representative to the Atlantic Council. President John F. Kennedy named him ambassador to South Vietnam in April, 1961.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Anh Do
Of all the places in the world, why did Larry Agran have to choose Vietnam? That's what local Vietnamese Americans wondered after learning the longtime Irvine councilman hoped to forge a relationship between the master-planned community and Nha Trang, a south coastal city in Vietnam known for its beaches and scuba diving. To many who fled the country after it fell to communist forces, Agran's proposal seemed designed to cause hurt and hundreds indicated they planned to confront Agran on Tuesday when he was expected to roll out his “friendship city” proposal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2014 | By Anh Do
At last, they marched. On Saturday, dozens of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender immigrants marched in the annual Tet parade in Little Saigon. The rainbow flag, a distinctive symbol of gay pride, fluttered alongside emblems of California, the United States and South Vietnam. "We love you," participants yelled at friends, family members and thousands of others lining the parade route in Westminster, many dressed to celebrate the Lunar New Year. "We love you, too," some eager youths responded, whistling with joy. The historic moment followed months of fighting as organizers initially sought to ban LGBT activists from joining one of the community's biggest events.
OPINION
May 8, 2013
Re "The Vietnam syndrome," Opinion, May 5 Frank Snepp, a former CIA analyst who was in Vietnam during the fall of Saigon in 1975, worries that we may not have learned the lessons of our war in that country. He may have missed the most important lesson. Vietnam today is a small country that represents no great threat to the United States or its allies. The collapse of South Vietnam didn't lead to falling dominoes or global disaster. We should ponder this outcome when we hear warnings of doom about our withdrawals from Iraq and Afghanistan or our refusal to intervene in Syria.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2013 | By Anh Do, Los Angeles Times
One girl gasps as the grainy black-and-white footage rolls: Women are screaming, thrusting their babies at soldiers boarding a helicopter. In the next scene, hundreds of refugees packed in the belly of a rickety boat rock in the ocean, desperately trying to flee their homeland after the fall of Saigon. Gathered in a Garden Grove office, young adults who grew up in the shadow of war watch the images, only tasting the horrors their parents and relatives endured when South Vietnam fell to Communist forces 38 years ago. For many in immigrant communities like Orange County's Little Saigon, the memory of April 30 - "Black April" to those who lived through it - has been passed on only through photographs, stories or rough video clips.
NEWS
April 23, 2013 | By David Lamb
The Metropole , Hanoi 's legendary colonial hotel built in 1901, is offering four daily tours to its recently reopened underground concrete bunker where guests, staff and anti-war activists such as Joan Baez and Jane Fonda sought safety from U.S air raids during the Vietnam War. The bomb shelter, 12 feet beneath the surface and equipped with ventilation, was sealed and buried after the war. Many old-timers knew about it, but no one had...
BUSINESS
April 12, 2013 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
The gig: David Tran, 68, founded hot sauce company Huy Fong Foods Inc. in Chinatown in 1980 and a few years later introduced Sriracha sauce to the U.S. His Sriracha, a version of a hot sauce originating in Si Racha, Thailand, quickly spread through the San Gabriel Valley and eventually the nation. The fiery red concoction in the clear bottle with the distinctive green cap and rooster logo has since gone mainstream: Google "Sriracha" and you'll find such things as cookbooks, water bottles, iPhone cases and T-shirts.
OPINION
May 3, 2004 | Quang X. Pham, Quang X. Pham, a Marine veteran of the 1991 Persian Gulf War, is writing a memoir about duty, fate and the aftermath of war.
Shortly after noon on April 30, 1975, a mass of panicky Vietnamese refugees on Guam burst into tears. They had been huddling near the camp's operations center listening to the BBC. My mother was among the crowd of mostly women and elderly people. "The communists have entered Saigon. It's all over." The radio announcement quickly filtered throughout the camp. Our worst fears had been realized, for my father was still in Saigon, whereabouts unknown.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1987 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
Whether through natural cataclysm, pestilence or genocide, the chronicle of history is rife with human dislocation. The Old World offered its uprooted the daunting spectre of the unknown. The new still offers America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2013 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stanley Karnow, an award-winning author and journalist who combined insightful reporting with personal accounts and historical sweep in books on the Vietnam War and the Philippines and the critically acclaimed public television series that accompanied the works, died Sunday at his home in Potomac, Md. He was 87. Karnow had congestive heart failure and died in his sleep, said son Michael Karnow. A former correspondent for Time, the Washington Post and other publications, Karnow was one of the first U.S. journalists to report from Vietnam in the late 1950s, when American involvement in South Vietnam was still confined to a small group of advisors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2012 | By Anh Do, Los Angeles Times
The eldest sibling in Vietnam's most enduring singing family, Duy Quang was known for holding audiences enthralled as he boomed out the ballads of yesteryear, many penned by his father, Pham Duy, who knew how to tug at a listener's heart with songs about folk life. So when news spread of Duy Quang's death, stores in Orange County's Little Saigon shuffled their displays to highlight his music. The performer, who had lung cancer, died Wednesday at Fountain Valley Regional Hospital and Medical Center.
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