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South West Africa People S Organization

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NEWS
April 15, 1989 | From Associated Press
U.N. officials and Namibia's South African-appointed administrator Friday extended to April 21 the deadline for an estimated 900 black nationalist guerrillas to withdraw to Angola to salvage the independence plan for this South-African controlled territory. The previous deadline for the guerrilla withdrawal was today. "A prolonged stalemate in the affected areas is in no one's interest," a joint statement said. Gerhard Roux, spokesman for administrator Louis Pienaar, said Friday that 13 guerrillas have been killed in battles with security forces in the last several days.
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NEWS
December 5, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of jubilant supporters in Namibia's capital, Windhoek, celebrated the runaway victories of President Sam Nujoma and his ruling party in the South African nation's third democratic election. With most of the ballots counted, the South-West African People's Organization, or SWAPO, had 77% of the vote. Nujoma, 70, also took 77% of the presidential ballot in winning a third term.
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NEWS
July 22, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
After fighting the South-West Africa People's Organization (SWAPO) for two decades in one of the world's longest guerrilla wars, the South African army believes that it has won the military battle. But it knows too that it could still lose the more important political struggle for the future of Namibia, Africa's last colony.
NEWS
June 15, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The South African army ran a multimillion-dollar covert scheme, code-named Operation Agree, to prop up its political friends during 1989 elections in Namibia and smear the favored South-West Africa People's Organization, a former military agent said Friday.
NEWS
February 20, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
At least 14 people were killed Friday by a bomb blast at a crowded bank in northern Namibia in the deadliest attack of the 21-year-old guerrilla war in this South Africa-administered territory. Police blamed the attack in the town of Oshakati on guerrillas of the South-West Africa People's Organization (SWAPO), which is fighting for independence of the territory. But a SWAPO spokesman denied responsibility.
NEWS
December 5, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of jubilant supporters in Namibia's capital, Windhoek, celebrated the runaway victories of President Sam Nujoma and his ruling party in the South African nation's third democratic election. With most of the ballots counted, the South-West African People's Organization, or SWAPO, had 77% of the vote. Nujoma, 70, also took 77% of the presidential ballot in winning a third term.
NEWS
April 6, 1989
South Africa offered safe passage out of Namibia for nationalist guerrillas fighting South African-led security forces in the territory, but the South-West Africa People's Organization (SWAPO) rejected the offer. SWAPO said its guerrillas should be confined to bases in Namibia, not in Angola. South Africa referred to a December agreement with Angola and Cuba providing for disarmament of SWAPO rebels at Angolan bases, along with a phased withdrawal of Cuban troops from Angola.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | Reuters
Tens of thousands of Namibians took to the streets Wednesday in a riot of pomp, color and pageantry to celebrate their nation's independence. The world's newest nation, which became the 160th member of the United Nations, launched a massive street party to mark the end of colonial domination, first by imperial Germany and since 1915 by neighboring South Africa. President Sam Nujoma and his Cabinet were installed by U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Namibia ended four decades of Pretoria-imposed apartheid and white colonial rule Wednesday, South Africans watched closely what many think could be a dress rehearsal for their own country's impending march away from racial segregation and black oppression.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | From Associated Press
Sam Nujoma, a former guerrilla leader who spent 30 years in exile, was elected Namibia's first president Friday and will take office when the territory wins independence from South Africa on March 21. Nujoma, 60, helped found the South-West Africa People's Organization in 1960 and led it through a 23-year guerrilla war against South African rule of Namibia, Africa's last colony.
NEWS
November 15, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leftist guerrillas, who entered politics after a 23-year war for independence from South Africa, captured a 57% majority in a U.N.-sponsored national election Tuesday, giving them an important but not decisive say in drawing up a new constitution. Several hundred supporters of the South-West Africa People's Organization (SWAPO), which had waged one of Africa's longest and bloodiest liberation struggles, danced merrily on Kaiser Street in downtown Windhoek as news of the election results spread.
NEWS
November 13, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 23 years, the guerrillas of the South-West Africa People's Organization fought a bush war to wrest control of Namibia from South African colonizers and plant the principles of Karl Marx deeply in the sandy soil of the sparsely populated territory. But today, as SWAPO sits on the verge of realizing its dream in Namibia's first free and democratic elections, the rhetoric of war has given way to the practicalities of politics.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A black tailor named Helmut Hamwaama awoke before dawn Tuesday, eager for his first glimpse of one-man, one-vote democracy. But when he arrived at his local polling station in this township, the line of like-minded men in work clothes and women carrying babies already stretched half a mile down the dusty road. After a six-hour wait, Hamwaama presented his registration card to U.N. officials.
NEWS
September 15, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Sam Nujoma, the black nationalist leader of Namibia's guerrillas, returned home Thursday after 30 years in exile to the tumultuous welcome of thousands amid heightened fears that his life is in danger. Only two days after Nujoma's most senior white adviser was assassinated, apparently by right-wing extremists, Nujoma stepped down from a chartered Boeing 767 jet to lead his South-West Africa People's Organization (SWAPO) in U.N.
NEWS
September 12, 1989
Two top-ranking officials of the South-West Africa People's Organization returned to Namibia from exile in Angola. They are expected to be joined later in the week by Sam Nujoma, leader of the once-outlawed guerrilla movement. Secretary General Andimba Toivo ja Toivo and national chairman David Meroro arrived at Windhoek on a flight from Luanda. "Home, sweet home," Ja Toivo said after kissing the tarmac. "It is very sweet to be back."
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