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NEWS
April 10, 1986
Census takers began canvassing several Southeast area communities this week to follow up on questionnaires sent to almost 240,000 households on March 14. But the number of households in the survey was cut roughly in half last week when the U. S. Census Bureau decided the low response rate by mail threatened the completion of the interim census.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2012 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
A second person in Los Angeles County has died of West Nile virus this year, and 54 cases of the illness have been reported locally, public health officials announced Tuesday. The latest death prompted the county health department to renew warnings for people to take precautions and reduce their exposure to mosquitoes, which can transmit the virus through their bites. Health officials said the two who died were both in their 80s and lived in the southeastern part of the county.
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NEWS
February 7, 1993 | DUKE HELFAND
When Assemblywoman Martha Escutia (D-Huntington Park) attends the California Economic Summit in Los Angeles, she will have plenty of Southeast-area concerns to discuss--from the lack of accessible public transportation to the need for more health facilities and job-training centers.
NEWS
April 20, 1995 | JOHN CANALIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Philip Adsit sits in his back yard in Downey, waiting for his beloved homing pigeons to return. His 12-bird team was released only hours earlier in Modesto at the start of a 302-mile race against about 700 other Southeast-area pigeons. Just as Adsit, 69, looks up, one of his "athletes of the sky" cuts through the wind and starts circling the yard. "Here comes a bird!" he exclaims. "Come on, come on!" The pigeon swoops down, landing gracefully on a coop.
NEWS
September 18, 1994 | SIMON ROMERO
With little experience or business acumen, German Lopez opened Azteca Tae Kwon Do, a small South Gate martial arts studio, two years ago. His goal was to tap into a sizable Spanish-speaking market, but Lopez quickly found he needed more than just expertise in self-defense to survive. "I was good at martial arts, but bad at doing business," Lopez said. With little knowledge of advertising, promotions and direct mail strategies, Lopez's business was floundering.
NEWS
October 1, 1987
Goodwill Industries of Southern California has extended its donation pick-up service to include the Southeast area cities of Commerce, Downey, Lynwood, Maywood, Montebello, Pico Rivera, Santa Fe Springs and Whittier. "We have added three truck routes and six employees to our pick-up crew to provide greater service to the Southeast area," said Dan Mulcahy, vice president of community relations. Routes are scheduled twice weekly for the new service area.
NEWS
September 16, 1993
The Los Angeles Unified School District has set up a toll-free hot line aimed at reducing the number of students who skip class. The number is (800) 865-2873, by which adults may report the location of students not in school, attendance counselor Nathana Schooler said. A truant officer will respond. Schooler said the hot line is also staffed by workers who speak Spanish and other foreign languages.
NEWS
November 28, 1991
Several Southeast area schools and students were among the top scorers in this year's Los Angeles County Academic Decathlon. Among the 69 participating high schools, Warren High in Downey finished sixth and El Rancho High in Pico Rivera was seventh. The other top 20 finishers were Whitney High (14th) and Cerritos High (18th) in Cerritos. West High in Torrance won the competition with 44,911 points out of a possible 60,000. William S. Hart High of Newhall finished second.
NEWS
March 17, 1994
Education activists in the Southeast area, angered by a recommendation to create a "super cluster" of the three local high school complexes when the Los Angeles Unified School District reorganizes, say it may be time to secede. "There are those in the area that feel we should be our own school district," said Assemblywoman Martha M. Escutia (D-Huntington Park).
NEWS
July 30, 1992
A federal judge has ruled that 14 cities that used the Operating Industries Inc. landfill in Monterey Park share responsibility for some of the estimated $500-million costs to clean up the toxic site. Many of the cities are in the Southeast area. U.S. District Judge William M. Byrne Jr. held last week that the cities that transported commercial and residential waste to the site for dozens of years contributed to the toxic mess. The cities deny responsibility for the waste taken to the dump.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1995 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The county Board of Supervisors on Thursday approved a controversial flood-protection plan for the southern reaches of the Los Angeles River despite opposition from environmentalists who complained that concrete walls along the waterway will destroy habitats and parkland. County public works officials said the walls are necessary to contain a so-called 100-year flood that would overrun river banks and devastate cities in southeast Los Angeles County.
NEWS
December 22, 1994 | JOHN CANALIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's a crisp winter night and Chris Wilkinson is doing what she loves best--assuming the role of Mrs. Claus, matriarch of the Yuletide spirit. Clad in a green and red dress, a curly white wig and round spectacles, Wilkinson appears before about 500 onlookers who have gathered in front of her darkened La Mirada home. Children perched atop their parents' shoulders strain to get a glimpse. "I wanna see, I wanna see," one child says. "Where's Santa?" asks another.
NEWS
September 18, 1994 | SIMON ROMERO
With little experience or business acumen, German Lopez opened Azteca Tae Kwon Do, a small South Gate martial arts studio, two years ago. His goal was to tap into a sizable Spanish-speaking market, but Lopez quickly found he needed more than just expertise in self-defense to survive. "I was good at martial arts, but bad at doing business," Lopez said. With little knowledge of advertising, promotions and direct mail strategies, Lopez's business was floundering.
NEWS
August 28, 1994 | SIMON ROMERO
Prospects appear dim for restored county library service in several Southeast cities, where city councils have shied away from a household assessment tax to help finance the troubled institutions. The Maywood and Cudahy councils have given their approval but Bell's opposed the plan. Huntington Park's council postponed its vote until Monday, and South Gate's postponed a decision until Sept. 6.
NEWS
August 11, 1994 | SIMON ROMERO
In an effort to bring attention to the poor nutritional habits and medical needs among the elderly, a massive donation of fresh fruit was made last week to more than 5,000 senior citizens. Twenty tons of fruit were donated by San Joaquin Valley peach and nectarine growers in conjunction with the nonprofit Fresno Food Bank. The food bank arranged to have the fruit sorted, bagged and delivered to Southern California. Qwik Way Trucking of Vernon donated transportation for the local distribution.
NEWS
August 11, 1994 | MARY GUTHRIE
Students who live too far from a state university to attend part-time programs or those who just want to study from home may now earn a master's degree in business from their living rooms. Cal State Dominguez Hills will start a program this fall that allows students to watch TV broadcasts of all 15 classes required for a master's degree in business administration. Channel 58 will air the programs. The classes will be offered from 9 a.m. to noon every Saturday and Sunday starting Aug. 27.
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | MARY HELEN BERG
Health care providers could be wooed to the medically underserved Southeast area through incentives similar to those used to attract business to economically troubled areas, according to a bill being considered by an Assembly Committee. The bill, introduced by Assemblywoman Martha M. Escutia (D-Huntington Park) would create 10 "medical enterprise zones" throughout the state and make available tax credits and other incentives to health professionals who practice in the zones.
NEWS
August 4, 1994
The only challenger facing Democratic Assemblyman Willard H. Murray Jr. has withdrawn from the November race for the 52nd Assembly District, clearing the way for the incumbent to serve a fourth term. Republican candidate Richard A. Rorex, 57, of Gardena said he withdrew last week after being hired as a maintenance mechanic with the U.S. Postal Service processing center in Bell. Postal Service attorneys advised Rorex that postal workers cannot hold partisan political office. Murray was considered a strong favorite, anyway, in the heavily Democratic district that includes Gardena, as well as the Southeast communities of Compton, Paramount and Lynwood.
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