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NEWS
February 2, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Two boys squat in the thin shade of a utility pole on a scorching Bangkok sidewalk, peering at the license plates on an oncoming car. The last number is odd, a five. To the yelp of victory, money changes hands. In a nearby cafe, three men sit silently over a round of sweating beers and Mekhong whiskey. They watch the gecko lizards gripping the walls and ceiling, waiting for one to begin its staccato chatter. The bets are down: four chirps, six or seven.
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NEWS
August 1, 2001 | ROBERT STRAUSS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Seven years ago, when Soc Thach was just 15, he trudged through jungles in the Mekong Delta in Vietnam, going along the long trail that would lead him to his new home in the United States. Now he and a group of other ethnic Cambodians living in and around Philadelphia spend some of what little leisure time they have on the Schuylkill River.
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NEWS
January 26, 1997 | RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Khang Lai sees his entire life on the shelves and in the file cabinets of this small room on the third floor of UC Irvine's main library. The 23-year-old student picks up a book and thumbs through, nodding at the descriptions of Southeast Asian refugee camps, where he and his family lived after fleeing the Communist takeover in Vietnam two decades ago.
TRAVEL
November 1, 1998 | KARIN ESTERHAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Learn about the archeology and ancient kingdoms of Southeast Asia on a 21-day tour that begins Jan. 8. It focuses on the ancient Champa and Khmer kingdoms, the religious and folk cultures of Laos and Cambodia and the Confucian traditions of Vietnam. In Da Nang, Vietnam, the group will view a large collection of 9th to 12th century Cham stone sculptures. In Phnom Penh, Cambodia, the tour will visit the National Museum, with its collection of Khmer artwork.
NEWS
January 28, 1997 | RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Khang Lai sees his entire life on the shelves and in the file cabinets of a small room on the third floor of UC Irvine's main library. The 23-year-old student picks a book off a shelf and thumbs through, nodding knowingly at the descriptions of Southeast Asian refugee camps, where he and his family lived after fleeing the Communist takeover of South Vietnam two decades ago.
NEWS
July 15, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
A summit in Southeast Asia would bring together an Indonesian with only one name, a Malaysian with no family name and a woman known universally and simply by her nickname, Cory. From the Filipino Popsys and Bongbongs, to Indonesia's singular Suharto and South Korea's multitudinous Kims, Lees and Parks, names in the Orient are a nightmare for outsiders. "My friend's name is Chunhachiwachaloke," said a Thai secretary. "His first name is Ekachai. We call him Ek." The Thais are a sensible people.
NEWS
April 9, 1995 | RENEE TAWA, Times Staff Writer
In our tradition, a woman gets more trust when she's stitched. Let me give you an example. In the morning, leaving your apartment, would you leave your door open or locked? A woman is not a door, but she's property to someone. She's my property. --Ali, a 32-year-old Somali man, in "Fire Eyes," a documentary by Soraya Mire That day, her mother tricked her. "I'm going to buy you some gifts," she said. Soraya Mire, then 13, obediently got into the car with her mother and a driver.
NEWS
March 14, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
This was the big one. The best and the brightest had flocked to this small provincial town--heavyweights every one, maybe an ounce apiece. The third annual Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations barred-ground-dove contest was under way. At stake were bucks and bragging rights for the best coo in this neck of the world. Lim Seong Koh, a 42-year-old coffee shop owner from Penang, Malaysia, settled in for the 3-hour round of competition. The question was: Would Hitler sing?
NEWS
August 1, 2001 | ROBERT STRAUSS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Seven years ago, when Soc Thach was just 15, he trudged through jungles in the Mekong Delta in Vietnam, going along the long trail that would lead him to his new home in the United States. Now he and a group of other ethnic Cambodians living in and around Philadelphia spend some of what little leisure time they have on the Schuylkill River.
TRAVEL
November 1, 1998 | KARIN ESTERHAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Learn about the archeology and ancient kingdoms of Southeast Asia on a 21-day tour that begins Jan. 8. It focuses on the ancient Champa and Khmer kingdoms, the religious and folk cultures of Laos and Cambodia and the Confucian traditions of Vietnam. In Da Nang, Vietnam, the group will view a large collection of 9th to 12th century Cham stone sculptures. In Phnom Penh, Cambodia, the tour will visit the National Museum, with its collection of Khmer artwork.
NEWS
January 28, 1997 | RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Khang Lai sees his entire life on the shelves and in the file cabinets of a small room on the third floor of UC Irvine's main library. The 23-year-old student picks a book off a shelf and thumbs through, nodding knowingly at the descriptions of Southeast Asian refugee camps, where he and his family lived after fleeing the Communist takeover of South Vietnam two decades ago.
NEWS
January 26, 1997 | RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Khang Lai sees his entire life on the shelves and in the file cabinets of this small room on the third floor of UC Irvine's main library. The 23-year-old student picks up a book and thumbs through, nodding at the descriptions of Southeast Asian refugee camps, where he and his family lived after fleeing the Communist takeover in Vietnam two decades ago.
NEWS
April 9, 1995 | RENEE TAWA, Times Staff Writer
In our tradition, a woman gets more trust when she's stitched. Let me give you an example. In the morning, leaving your apartment, would you leave your door open or locked? A woman is not a door, but she's property to someone. She's my property. --Ali, a 32-year-old Somali man, in "Fire Eyes," a documentary by Soraya Mire That day, her mother tricked her. "I'm going to buy you some gifts," she said. Soraya Mire, then 13, obediently got into the car with her mother and a driver.
NEWS
March 14, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
This was the big one. The best and the brightest had flocked to this small provincial town--heavyweights every one, maybe an ounce apiece. The third annual Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations barred-ground-dove contest was under way. At stake were bucks and bragging rights for the best coo in this neck of the world. Lim Seong Koh, a 42-year-old coffee shop owner from Penang, Malaysia, settled in for the 3-hour round of competition. The question was: Would Hitler sing?
NEWS
February 2, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Two boys squat in the thin shade of a utility pole on a scorching Bangkok sidewalk, peering at the license plates on an oncoming car. The last number is odd, a five. To the yelp of victory, money changes hands. In a nearby cafe, three men sit silently over a round of sweating beers and Mekhong whiskey. They watch the gecko lizards gripping the walls and ceiling, waiting for one to begin its staccato chatter. The bets are down: four chirps, six or seven.
NEWS
July 15, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
A summit in Southeast Asia would bring together an Indonesian with only one name, a Malaysian with no family name and a woman known universally and simply by her nickname, Cory. From the Filipino Popsys and Bongbongs, to Indonesia's singular Suharto and South Korea's multitudinous Kims, Lees and Parks, names in the Orient are a nightmare for outsiders. "My friend's name is Chunhachiwachaloke," said a Thai secretary. "His first name is Ekachai. We call him Ek." The Thais are a sensible people.
TRAVEL
September 12, 1999 | KARIN ESTERHAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Double-decker buses that have been converted into B&Bs on wheels will take guests on tours of the English countryside and Yorkshire. Five-day tours are available year-round. The buses are fully equipped with four twin cabins, bunk beds, showers, restrooms and a dining room. Passengers will tour the coastal towns of Whitby and Robin Hood's Bay, and the walled city of York and Castle Howard. Cost: $468 per person, double occupancy, including cabin and breakfasts.
NEWS
June 29, 1986 | DAVID SHAW, Times Staff Writer
From the time he started high school in Fayetteville, N.C., David Zucchino knew he wanted to spend his adult life as a foreign correspondent. Why? "Travel . . . glamour . . . romance . . . wearing a trench coat and carrying a Luger." Zucchino is 34 now and, like most foreign correspondents, he's never carried a Luger (or any other kind of gun). Nor does he wear a trench coat. But he has been the Philadelphia Inquirer correspondent in war-torn Beirut and, now, in Nairobi, Kenya.
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