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Southeast Asia Economy

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NEWS
February 10, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southeast Asia's economic crash has given a boost to the region's democracy movements as more people dare criticize their governments and demand political reform as well as greater respect for human rights. For a region whose governments often have been willing to sacrifice the personal liberties of their people for economic advancement, the drumbeat of dissenting voices is a notable shift from traditional acquiescence to authority. It also is coming from unlikely places.
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NEWS
December 17, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southeast Asian leaders Wednesday unveiled what they called a "bold" plan to reinvigorate economies that have been pounded into recession after two decades of stunning growth. Although the "Hanoi Action Plan," announced at the conclusion of a two-day summit, contained little that was likely to provoke a reaction from investors or markets, it was reassuring to Western economists because the 34-point declaration emphasized that recovery is dependent on continued free-market policies. The Assn.
NEWS
December 17, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southeast Asian leaders Wednesday unveiled what they called a "bold" plan to reinvigorate economies that have been pounded into recession after two decades of stunning growth. Although the "Hanoi Action Plan," announced at the conclusion of a two-day summit, contained little that was likely to provoke a reaction from investors or markets, it was reassuring to Western economists because the 34-point declaration emphasized that recovery is dependent on continued free-market policies. The Assn.
NEWS
October 25, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Diego businessman Richard Franke didn't even bother stopping in Bangkok on a trip to Asia earlier this month. This summer's 40% plunge in the Thai baht had priced his firm's blood pressure monitors out of that market. Instead, he went to Malaysia to help out a new distributor shaken by that country's similar woes. And now he is closely monitoring the Hong Kong stock market, looking for signs of problems that would threaten his sales to mainland China.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1994 | Bloomberg Business News
ISSUE: In 1993, billions of dollars' worth of foreign investment flowed into the bourses of Hong Kong, Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia and the Philippines. Investors who jumped in early enough last year saw some sweet returns. But will the joy ride continue in 1994? BACKGROUND: A few numbers tell a very compelling story. As of Dec. 28, Hong Kong stocks were up 110% in dollar terms since the beginning of 1993, while Philippine stocks had advanced by a head-turning 152%.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1991 | ELIZABETH LU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just when it seems that Indochina is within grasp of winning the international financial aid it so desperately seeks, a powerful competitor comes along and grabs all the attention from lenders. As the World Bank-International Monetary Fund (IMF) annual meeting begins here Tuesday, countries such as Vietnam and Cambodia find themselves vying for attention and dollars against the Soviet Union, which managed to obtain associate IMF membership last week.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Government officials in Indochina were almost smug when Asia's economic miracle evaporated last summer in clouds of red ink, bankrupt companies and crashing stock markets. "We're immune," they declared, and at first glance there was good cause to believe that the mini-economies of Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia were. None of the countries has a stock exchange. Their currencies are nonconvertible. Their industries are, to varying degrees, state-run and unconcerned with the bottom line.
NEWS
July 29, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a confrontation with an increasingly important ally, the United States on Monday bluntly castigated Malaysia on highly sensitive economic and diplomatic issues during Secretary of State Madeleine Albright's final day of talks with leaders of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations, or ASEAN. Senior U.S.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By late July, Orlando Ayala knew he had a serious problem in Southeast Asia, where a rash of currency devaluations was strangling the demand for imported software. After battling software pirates to build up a $200-million-a-year market for Microsoft Corp.'s products in the region, Ayala was determined not to let jittery investors and speculators ruin his work. Within 24 hours, the software executive had devised a plan designed to keep his distributors in business until the worst was over.
NEWS
April 11, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty years ago, Vietnam's Communist government set out to destroy free enterprise. Not surprisingly, its storm troopers headed straight for Cholon, the sprawling, prosperous Chinese district of Ho Chi Minh City. Truckloads of soldiers and volunteers wearing red armbands descended on the maze of crowded, narrow streets to inventory personal property--everything from gold watches to factory machines--that was to be turned over to the state.
NEWS
March 23, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man-made Indonesian fires that blanketed Southeast Asia last autumn with clouds of choking haze are burning again, raising the specter that another environmental disaster looms just ahead. When that earlier haze--a regional euphemism for fire-caused pollution--swept over Southeast Asia, it closed airports, crippled tourism and caused serious health problems.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Government officials in Indochina were almost smug when Asia's economic miracle evaporated last summer in clouds of red ink, bankrupt companies and crashing stock markets. "We're immune," they declared, and at first glance there was good cause to believe that the mini-economies of Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia were. None of the countries has a stock exchange. Their currencies are nonconvertible. Their industries are, to varying degrees, state-run and unconcerned with the bottom line.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By late July, Orlando Ayala knew he had a serious problem in Southeast Asia, where a rash of currency devaluations was strangling the demand for imported software. After battling software pirates to build up a $200-million-a-year market for Microsoft Corp.'s products in the region, Ayala was determined not to let jittery investors and speculators ruin his work. Within 24 hours, the software executive had devised a plan designed to keep his distributors in business until the worst was over.
NEWS
October 25, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Diego businessman Richard Franke didn't even bother stopping in Bangkok on a trip to Asia earlier this month. This summer's 40% plunge in the Thai baht had priced his firm's blood pressure monitors out of that market. Instead, he went to Malaysia to help out a new distributor shaken by that country's similar woes. And now he is closely monitoring the Hong Kong stock market, looking for signs of problems that would threaten his sales to mainland China.
NEWS
July 29, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a confrontation with an increasingly important ally, the United States on Monday bluntly castigated Malaysia on highly sensitive economic and diplomatic issues during Secretary of State Madeleine Albright's final day of talks with leaders of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations, or ASEAN. Senior U.S.
NEWS
March 23, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man-made Indonesian fires that blanketed Southeast Asia last autumn with clouds of choking haze are burning again, raising the specter that another environmental disaster looms just ahead. When that earlier haze--a regional euphemism for fire-caused pollution--swept over Southeast Asia, it closed airports, crippled tourism and caused serious health problems.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1997 | TOM PETRUNO
So far, investors appear to believe that the currency devaluations in Thailand and the Philippines were the right medicine. In Thailand, the main stock market index has surged to 628.55 from an eight-year low of 464.77 on June 19, for a gain of 35%. In the Philippines, the composite stock index rocketed 190 points on Friday, or 7.6%, to 2,701.14, immediately after the nation's central bank stopped defending the peso. The index still is down 15% year-to-date, however.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1997 | TOM PETRUNO
So far, investors appear to believe that the currency devaluations in Thailand and the Philippines were the right medicine. In Thailand, the main stock market index has surged to 628.55 from an eight-year low of 464.77 on June 19, for a gain of 35%. In the Philippines, the composite stock index rocketed 190 points on Friday, or 7.6%, to 2,701.14, immediately after the nation's central bank stopped defending the peso. The index still is down 15% year-to-date, however.
NEWS
July 22, 1996 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a nascent pro-democracy movement gathers strength here, U.S. civil rights leader Jesse Jackson on Sunday offered high-profile support for the country's key opposition figure, who has come under increasing pressure from the Indonesian government. Jackson, visiting Jakarta largely to publicize a campaign pressing U.S.
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