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NEWS
December 12, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When times get bad, economically or politically, Thailand's army traditionally loads its rifles and topples the civilian government in a coup d'etat. It is a scenario that has been repeated 17 times in the past 66 years. So what's going on now? Times are really tough economically, and no one is greasing up the tanks. Soldiers are teaching the jobless to knit and read, and generals in sneakers are leading "Thai Help Thai" marches to raise money for the poor.
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NEWS
November 5, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a musty old villa on Street 240, Lao Mong Hay and his staff of 26 Cambodians--four of them security guards--play a high-stakes game as commandos for democratic reform. In their cross hairs are Cambodia's tough-guy prime minister and the country's tradition of human rights abuse. Ask the bespectacled Hay what he thinks of the government and the words "elements of fascism" creep into his assessment. Prime Minister Hun Sen?
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NEWS
August 11, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After declaring the region's economic crisis over at a meeting in Thailand this month, leaders of Southeast Asia's 10 nations are grappling with a new concern: growing political instability from the Philippines to Indonesia.
NEWS
August 11, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After declaring the region's economic crisis over at a meeting in Thailand this month, leaders of Southeast Asia's 10 nations are grappling with a new concern: growing political instability from the Philippines to Indonesia.
NEWS
November 5, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a musty old villa on Street 240, Lao Mong Hay and his staff of 26 Cambodians--four of them security guards--play a high-stakes game as commandos for democratic reform. In their cross hairs are Cambodia's tough-guy prime minister and the country's tradition of human rights abuse. Ask the bespectacled Hay what he thinks of the government and the words "elements of fascism" creep into his assessment. Prime Minister Hun Sen?
NEWS
May 4, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Relations between press and government are chilled in Southeast Asia, with domestic and foreign publications alike facing restraints. A young generation of Asian reporters has been exposed, in theory at least, to Western press freedoms, and many are chafing under the controls. "I think that it is time we made a strong stand," Yazid Othman, a Malaysian and president of the Confederation of ASEAN Journalists, told a recent conference in Bangkok. He called on the member governments of the Assn.
NEWS
June 2, 1991 | RUTH YOUNGBLOOD, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
Malaysia, anxious to retain its position as the world's top producer of rubber, is revolutionizing the industry by scrapping antiquated techniques relying on excessive human labor in favor of innovative machines. Faced with low prices and a crippling shortage of workers as the young rush to the booming manufacturing sector, Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad has branded traditional rubber-tapping methods as "terribly inefficient" and called for modernization.
NEWS
February 10, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
As many as eight Islamic militants with alleged links to the Al Qaeda terrorist network evaded a police sweep and slipped out of Singapore, Senior Minister Lee Kuan Yew said in an interview. Singapore in December detained 15 suspected members of Jemaah Islamiah, a radical group in Southeast Asia. The government said the 15 planned to bomb Western embassies, Navy ships and other targets in the Asian city-state. Two of the suspects were later released.
NEWS
March 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
With hundreds of blazes on the Indonesian island of Sumatra casting haze across much of Southeast Asia, the government on Friday said it would crack down on farmers and loggers using fire to clear land. The government said it will confiscate the license of any plantation owner or logger caught using fire as a cheap--but illegal--method of clearing land for planting. "Anyone involved in the burning should be punished," Indonesian Foreign Minister Alwi Shihab said. "We will do whatever we can . .
TRAVEL
January 5, 1992 | LARRY HABEGGER and JAMES O'REILLY, Habegger and O'Reilly are free-lance writers based in San Francisco.
World Travel Watch is a monthly report designed to help you make informed judgments about travel. Because conditions can change overnight, always make your own inquiries before you leave home. In the United States, contact your passport agency office; abroad, check in with the nearest American embassy. Commonwealth of Independent States Due to intense fighting in the capital city of Tbilisi, all travel to the republic of Georgia in the former Soviet Union should be avoided at this time.
NEWS
December 12, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When times get bad, economically or politically, Thailand's army traditionally loads its rifles and topples the civilian government in a coup d'etat. It is a scenario that has been repeated 17 times in the past 66 years. So what's going on now? Times are really tough economically, and no one is greasing up the tanks. Soldiers are teaching the jobless to knit and read, and generals in sneakers are leading "Thai Help Thai" marches to raise money for the poor.
NEWS
June 2, 1991 | RUTH YOUNGBLOOD, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
Malaysia, anxious to retain its position as the world's top producer of rubber, is revolutionizing the industry by scrapping antiquated techniques relying on excessive human labor in favor of innovative machines. Faced with low prices and a crippling shortage of workers as the young rush to the booming manufacturing sector, Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad has branded traditional rubber-tapping methods as "terribly inefficient" and called for modernization.
NEWS
May 4, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Relations between press and government are chilled in Southeast Asia, with domestic and foreign publications alike facing restraints. A young generation of Asian reporters has been exposed, in theory at least, to Western press freedoms, and many are chafing under the controls. "I think that it is time we made a strong stand," Yazid Othman, a Malaysian and president of the Confederation of ASEAN Journalists, told a recent conference in Bangkok. He called on the member governments of the Assn.
MAGAZINE
May 20, 1990 | ALAN BERLOW, Alan Berlow is a free-lance journalist based in Manila.
THERE IS A SURREAL and, at the same time, ethereal quality to Burma's capital city of Rangoon. At dawn, Buddhist monks in rust- or wine-colored robes fan out through the city, walking from house to house with shiny, black-lacquered begging bowls, silently accepting offerings of rice or fish. They pass through streets and parks where palm readers and astrologers unlock the secrets of life, where snake oil salesmen and sundry merchants of miracles patiently minister to their customers.
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