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Southeast Asia Health

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NEWS
February 12, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The global AIDS epidemic is worsening faster than experts earlier believed, according to new figures released Tuesday by the World Health Organization. The organization predicted in 1988 that there would be a cumulative total of 15 million to 20 million adult AIDS infections by the year 2000.
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NEWS
November 16, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Throughout the 1980s, as AIDS ravaged millions of lives from the Americas to Africa, a mysterious thing was happening in Asia. The world's most populous continent was so untouched that scientists wondered if Asians had a gene that made them immune to the disease. But the late arrival of AIDS in Asia turned out to be a medical fluke.
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NEWS
November 16, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Throughout the 1980s, as AIDS ravaged millions of lives from the Americas to Africa, a mysterious thing was happening in Asia. The world's most populous continent was so untouched that scientists wondered if Asians had a gene that made them immune to the disease. But the late arrival of AIDS in Asia turned out to be a medical fluke.
NEWS
April 5, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man-made brush fires that are raging again in Indonesia are symptomatic of a wider regional peril: Southeast Asia's rapid development is racking up an alarming toll in environmental destruction. Pick almost any environmental topic, from urban pollution to deforestation, and Southeast Asia has a track record that is among the world's worst. The result could eventually derail the region's hope to achieve sustainable development and cause immeasurable global harm, ecologists say.
NEWS
April 5, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man-made brush fires that are raging again in Indonesia are symptomatic of a wider regional peril: Southeast Asia's rapid development is racking up an alarming toll in environmental destruction. Pick almost any environmental topic, from urban pollution to deforestation, and Southeast Asia has a track record that is among the world's worst. The result could eventually derail the region's hope to achieve sustainable development and cause immeasurable global harm, ecologists say.
NEWS
September 9, 1987
Dengue fever has killed hundreds of people this year, mostly children, and stricken tens of thousands of others in Thailand and other countries in Southeast Asia, health officials said in Bangkok. There were 79,000 cases in Thailand, with 399 deaths, by the end of August. Dengue fever is an acute infectious disease, occurring mainly in the tropics, that is transmitted by the Aedes mosquito. Symptoms include fever, headache and pain in joints. It can be controlled by eradicating mosquitoes.
SCIENCE
March 16, 2005 | Charles Piller, Times Staff Writer
After more than a year of watching patients sicken and die of bird flu, Dr. Tran Tinh Hien of the Hospital for Tropical Diseases here thought he understood the illness. Then last month, he learned of an unsettling study. Japanese researchers retested samples from 30 Vietnamese patients whose lab tests showed no signs of the disease. They discovered that seven had actually been infected.
NEWS
April 7, 1985 | MARCIA DUNN, Associated Press
Summer after summer, as certain as school vacations and sandlot baseball, the specter of polio terrified the nation. The victims were both young and adult, but most often they were defenseless children. Infantile paralysis struck regardless of race or riches, suburb or city. Thousands died each year. Tens of thousands were left crippled. Parents barred children from swimming pools, theaters and other public places where the disease was thought to fester.
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The global AIDS epidemic is worsening faster than experts earlier believed, according to new figures released Tuesday by the World Health Organization. The organization predicted in 1988 that there would be a cumulative total of 15 million to 20 million adult AIDS infections by the year 2000.
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