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Southeast Asia Population

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February 28, 1998 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When she looked from the second-floor window of her home in a village outside Bandung, Indonesia, Liu Lunmei says she saw "total chaos." The homes and small shops owned by Chinese families were being looted and burned. "People were being killed, raped and robbed," she said. Indonesian soldiers and police stood by and watched, sometimes even encouraging the anti-Chinese rioters.
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NEWS
February 28, 1998 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When she looked from the second-floor window of her home in a village outside Bandung, Indonesia, Liu Lunmei says she saw "total chaos." The homes and small shops owned by Chinese families were being looted and burned. "People were being killed, raped and robbed," she said. Indonesian soldiers and police stood by and watched, sometimes even encouraging the anti-Chinese rioters.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1989 | THEODORE FRIEND, Theodore Friend is the president of Eisenhower Exchange Fellowships in Philadelphia, Pa., and author of "The Blue-Eyed Enemy: Japan Against the West in Java and Luzon 1942-1945" (Princeton University Press)
What haunts the Philippines? The dead mother of Ferdinand Marcos has been lying in her parlor, embalmed for public viewing, for a year and a half--waiting for her son, the exiled ruler, to be allowed home to bury her. Now her son is dead, yet still forbidden to come home, because his remains could rend asunder the body politic. The widow of the dictator will very likely keep him, too, on public view as a rebuke to the Aquino administration.
NEWS
November 18, 1999 | GEORGE SKELTON
To be honest, living in the Central Valley takes some getting used to, especially if you're from the coast. It's an acquired taste. Oppressive heat in summer. Depressing tule fog in winter. Sure, fall and spring are OK. But where aren't they? First-rate culture is scarce. The state capital doesn't even have a symphony. One of the attractions--it's almost a local joke--is the ability to get away, particularly from Sacramento.
MAGAZINE
June 13, 1993 | Marlowe Hood, Marlowe Hood is a writer living in New York. A visiting scholar at Columbia University's East Asia Institute, he was a correspondent in Beijing from 1985 to 1989
COMING TO AMERICA ONE DAY IN THE SUMMER OF 1991, WITHOUT WARNING OR EXPLANATION, Zhou Wei and Xiao Chen were released from an Immigration and Naturalization Service prison in Texas. They had no money, no food and no idea where they were or how to contact the relatives in New York City they had never met. And it was pouring. The two men, both just shy of 21, were overwhelmed with joy.
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