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Southeast Asia Security

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NEWS
July 27, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration assured apprehensive Southeast Asian democracies Monday that the United States will maintain its current military presence in the region, despite its push to cut U.S. troop strength in Europe, and that it will move to enhance American military capability in South Korea. Secretary of State Warren Christopher told foreign ministers of countries belonging to the Assn.
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NEWS
July 16, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Europe has the Conference on Security and Cooperation. The Western Hemisphere has the Organization of American States. But as the recent nuclear crisis in North Korea demonstrated, when security problems boil over in Asia, there is no regional forum where countries can seek a peaceful solution. Since the 1980s, a number of Southeast Asian nations have been pressing the big powers to join them in a semi-permanent conference to discuss security matters.
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NEWS
July 29, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III came to the defense of Japan on Saturday after a top Southeast Asian official voiced fears that growing Japanese power plus friction between Washington and Tokyo could threaten the security of the region. The issue was raised by Foreign Minister Abu Hassan Omar of Malaysia during a closed-door meeting here of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations. Citing the decline in East-West tensions and some U.S.
NEWS
July 27, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration assured apprehensive Southeast Asian democracies Monday that the United States will maintain its current military presence in the region, despite its push to cut U.S. troop strength in Europe, and that it will move to enhance American military capability in South Korea. Secretary of State Warren Christopher told foreign ministers of countries belonging to the Assn.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III arrived Tuesday for a meeting of Southeast Asian nations at which Japan is emphasizing more than ever before its differences with the United States, both on human rights questions and on defense policy. At the annual conference of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations, Japan seized the initiative by proposing an enhanced security role for ASEAN--a suggestion that met with a cool response from the United States.
NEWS
July 16, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Europe has the Conference on Security and Cooperation. The Western Hemisphere has the Organization of American States. But as the recent nuclear crisis in North Korea demonstrated, when security problems boil over in Asia, there is no regional forum where countries can seek a peaceful solution. Since the 1980s, a number of Southeast Asian nations have been pressing the big powers to join them in a semi-permanent conference to discuss security matters.
NEWS
January 16, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council, alarmed by reports of battlefield advances by Khmer Rouge rebel forces in Cambodia, met here Monday to consider an Australian peace plan that calls for an interim U.N. administration in Cambodia until elections can be held. Four of the delegates--the U.S., Soviet, British and French--reportedly went into the closed talks encouraged by a report that the fifth, China, has softened its stand regarding the Communist Khmer Rouge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
SAN DIEGO -- Marine Staff Sgt. John Klacza, who took part in the assault on Baghdad in 2003 and will soon deploy to Okinawa and beyond, had a question about the potential negative side of multinational alliances in Asia. If the U.S. keeps encouraging alliances among Asian nations, he asked, couldn't that mean that if we went to war with one nation, we might have to go to war with all of that nation's allies, a scenario sort of like World War I?
NEWS
September 7, 2001 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Lost Soldiers" is a strong and unusual novel. On its face, it is a standard tale of intrigue, adventure and mystery. James Webb has written a well-plotted story about Americans and Vietnamese in Vietnam more than a quarter-century after the war's end. You want to know what will happen next: You will not be disappointed. Yet, in retrospect, the plot fades away, and what the reader remembers most is the deep pull of affection the Americans feel for Vietnam and the Vietnamese.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III arrived Tuesday for a meeting of Southeast Asian nations at which Japan is emphasizing more than ever before its differences with the United States, both on human rights questions and on defense policy. At the annual conference of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations, Japan seized the initiative by proposing an enhanced security role for ASEAN--a suggestion that met with a cool response from the United States.
NEWS
July 29, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III came to the defense of Japan on Saturday after a top Southeast Asian official voiced fears that growing Japanese power plus friction between Washington and Tokyo could threaten the security of the region. The issue was raised by Foreign Minister Abu Hassan Omar of Malaysia during a closed-door meeting here of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations. Citing the decline in East-West tensions and some U.S.
NEWS
January 16, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council, alarmed by reports of battlefield advances by Khmer Rouge rebel forces in Cambodia, met here Monday to consider an Australian peace plan that calls for an interim U.N. administration in Cambodia until elections can be held. Four of the delegates--the U.S., Soviet, British and French--reportedly went into the closed talks encouraged by a report that the fifth, China, has softened its stand regarding the Communist Khmer Rouge.
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