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Southeast Asian Nations

BUSINESS
February 28, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This week's historic summit between the leaders of Europe and Asia does not pose a threat to the United States' influential role in that region, according to the newly appointed Japanese ambassador to the U.S., Kunihiko Saito. The meeting in Bangkok, Thailand, scheduled for Friday and Saturday, brings together for the first time the leaders of the 15 European Union nations and their counterparts from the seven-member Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations, Japan, South Korea and China.
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BUSINESS
September 11, 1994 | ROSS KERBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's large Vietnamese American community, in helping to expand commerce with Vietnam, is becoming a brokerage center--forging deals between their home country and American companies looking to trade there. To locate scarce Vietnamese buyers, many U.S. companies are turning to Vietnamese American business people with family ties and connections in Vietnam to serve as their representatives.
NEWS
July 16, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Europe has the Conference on Security and Cooperation. The Western Hemisphere has the Organization of American States. But as the recent nuclear crisis in North Korea demonstrated, when security problems boil over in Asia, there is no regional forum where countries can seek a peaceful solution. Since the 1980s, a number of Southeast Asian nations have been pressing the big powers to join them in a semi-permanent conference to discuss security matters.
NEWS
November 16, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Clinton sits down this weekend with the leaders of the nations from around the Pacific Rim, the session will mark not just a historic event for the region but also the embodiment of American hopes to become, and to be perceived as, an Asian nation in the 21st Century. Never before have so many Asian heads of state and government gathered together in the same place at once.
NEWS
May 18, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seems symbolic that the Singapore government put its Trade Ministry atop a 50-story building made to look like a stack of gold coins. The view from the offices is of thousands of cargo containers waiting to be loaded aboard ships. Singapore's lifeblood is trade, and perhaps more than any other country, it depends upon the movement of goods for its survival.
NEWS
July 25, 1992 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III will arrive here today to find that the new world order, at least in Southeast Asia, has started without him. In its first annual meeting since the end of the Cold War, the six-nation Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations unexpectedly signed its first formal declaration on regional security in hopes of defusing rising tensions in the strategically important, potentially resource-rich South China Sea.
NEWS
October 3, 1991 | From Associated Press
Vietnam apparently has reversed a longstanding policy and agreed to take back "boat people" who are forcibly returned home, a U.N. official said Wednesday. Tens of thousands of Vietnamese have been denied refugee status but refuse to return home from several Southeast Asian countries and Hong Kong. More than 50,000 in Hong Kong alone are crowded in squalid, violence-ridden camps. To qualify for refugee status, the boat people must be found to be fleeing political persecution.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By now, the story is painfully familiar. Like so many other industries back in the 1960s, U.S. firms enjoyed a near monopoly in the manufacture of precision bearings, the tiny steel balls that are crucial to the moving parts of everything from aircraft to videocassette players. Along came Japanese competition, and the business virtually dried up in America, which today produces less than 1% of the world's bearings. Even those are made by U.S.-based Japanese plants.
NEWS
July 27, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III arrived in Indonesia on Thursday, seeking to deflect an extraordinary outpouring of criticism from Southeast Asian nations angry over current U.S. policies toward Indochina. Over the next three days, Baker is scheduled to meet with leaders of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), the regional organization that includes the six non-Communist nations of Singapore, Malaysia, the Philippines, Indonesia, Thailand and Brunei.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | From Reuters
Secretary of State James A. Baker III predicted Monday that, despite Beijing's violent crackdown on pro-democracy demonstrators, the Chinese people would eventually enjoy democratic freedoms. In a speech to the Asia Society in New York City, Baker also called on the trading partners of the Pacific to forge a new mechanism for economic cooperation. Regarding China's violent crackdown on pro-democracy demonstrators and the victory of hard-liners in the government, Baker sounded an upbeat note.
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