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BUSINESS
July 26, 1997 | Associated Press
The foreign ministers of Southeast Asian nations blamed "well-coordinated efforts" for a series of speculative attacks that have pushed their currencies sharply lower in recent weeks. The ministers, attending a meeting of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, said "self-serving purposes" motivated the campaign to drive down their currencies. They did not identify the guilty parties by name.
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BUSINESS
July 26, 1997 | Associated Press
The foreign ministers of Southeast Asian nations blamed "well-coordinated efforts" for a series of speculative attacks that have pushed their currencies sharply lower in recent weeks. The ministers, attending a meeting of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, said "self-serving purposes" motivated the campaign to drive down their currencies. They did not identify the guilty parties by name.
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BUSINESS
December 9, 1993 | MARK BOUSIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The recovery is proceeding at a modest pace in most areas of the country, but California's economy continues to lag behind the rest of the nation, according to a report released Wednesday by the Federal Reserve Board. The Fed gave the most optimistic overall assessment of the nation's economic activity in months, noting that "economic activity continued to expand at a moderate pace through the end of November" and that "reports were generally more optimistic than those of this summer."
NATIONAL
August 16, 2009 | Kim Murphy
The controversial Kensington gold mine in southeast Alaska has won an important go-ahead from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which approved an amended permit that will allow the mine to dump millions of tons of waste into a nearby lake. The project has been the subject of a national environmental fight over whether navigable lakes and rivers can be used as repositories for toxic mine tailings. The Corps last week announced it was extending Coeur Alaska's permit until 2014 and reiterated that the company could construct a tailings storage facility in Lower Slate Lake, below the mine.
WORLD
November 1, 2002 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writer
Above a stream, past chickens and geese and a muddy cow, sits a poor man's failed dream. The truck shone once. But now the 20-ton Ford rusts on the roadside with a flat tire, a busted headlight and a faded pair of leopard skin seat covers. Its owner, Ramazan Kaplan, sits near the truck, clearing his throat and waiting to unfold the story of his life's biggest gamble. Kaplan spends his time these days mostly talking; his wife grinds meal and stares for hours across the fields.
NATIONAL
October 7, 2007 | Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writer
From the shriveled cotton fields of northern Alabama to the browned lawns of suburban Atlanta, the Southeast is wilting under one of the most severe droughts in its history. In Alabama, Tennessee, North Carolina and Florida, there has been less rain than at any time since records began in 1894. Farmers, who face the brunt of the drought, are harvesting parched fields of damaged corn, peanuts, corn and soybeans. Cattle producers are selling their stock because they cannot afford to pay for feed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2000 | BECKY BOHRER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
From general store owner Terry Taylor's standpoint, life in this small town had almost all a person could require, just like the cramped store from which he dispenses everything from hunting supplies to embroidery floss. But Taylor felt something was missing. Call it a sense of place. An identity. Taylor calls it "a sense of belonging somewhere."
BUSINESS
February 18, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chinese from Taiwan are finding themselves among the most courted potential foreign investors anywhere. "Every other week, we see newspaper advertisements by foreign governments organizing investment-promotion seminars (in Taiwan) to explain the advantages of investing in their countries," said K. H. Wu, deputy chairman of the China Trade Development Council. The attractiveness of Taiwan's investors is not hard to explain.
NEWS
January 5, 1992 | TINA GRIEGO and ROXANA KOPETMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the gray of a winter morning, as downtown Long Beach began to stir, a group of bleary-eyed people gathered outside the glass doors of a yellow brick office building and waited. Hilton Hotels had announced it was hiring staff for its gleaming new downtown hotel, and the eye-catching advertisement beckoned the jobless to come out Dec. 2 and join "the winning team." They did.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wine is flowing, opera is playing and Ta-Lin Hsu is happy. Not because he is cruising blue waters off Thailand in a 120-foot rented yacht. And certainly not because he is relaxed. Hsu is smiling because here, amid a lush tropical paradise worthy of a Gauguin painting, he has found an American willing to part with some blue-chip Malaysian stocks at a steep discount.
NEWS
May 19, 1991 | FAYE FIORE and TINA GRIEGO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Judy Cejka takes her place in line at the Long Beach unemployment office at 10:40 a.m. It will be noon before she gets to the front. There is a cockroach climbing the wall behind her and a single job brochure posted on the bulletin board: cook foreman at a federal prison, $28,000 a year. Most economists say the recession is bottoming out and the nation will begin to recover by Christmas.
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