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Southeast Symphony Orchestra

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NEWS
February 22, 1998 | DEBRA HOTALING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If your kids regard orchestral fare as the Brussels sprouts of music--that is, nutritional and to be avoided at all costs--treat them and yourself to the Southeast Symphony Assn.'s golden jubilee concert at 7:30 tonight at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. The evening promises to be a tasty one, even for those who prefer a steady diet of rap, rock or Wee Sing.
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NEWS
February 22, 1998 | DEBRA HOTALING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If your kids regard orchestral fare as the Brussels sprouts of music--that is, nutritional and to be avoided at all costs--treat them and yourself to the Southeast Symphony Assn.'s golden jubilee concert at 7:30 tonight at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. The evening promises to be a tasty one, even for those who prefer a steady diet of rap, rock or Wee Sing.
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NEWS
May 16, 1993 | ELSTON CARR
For 45 years, the Southeast Symphony Orchestra has filled church halls and school auditoriums in South Los Angeles with the sounds of classical music. The 40-member Southeast Symphony does not have a high degree of name recognition or much funding. But its supporters say the symphony provides a valuable place for African-American classical musicians to hone their skills while providing quality entertainment for area residents. "This is a wonderful opportunity for them to train.
NEWS
September 8, 2002 | ANN CONWAY
Pageant Salute "Did you know my dad?" That was the question the young son of a fireman killed in the Sept. 11 attacks asked L.A. County Fire Capt. Gary Walsh when he welcomed him to California this summer. "I told him I didn't, but the L.A. County Fire Department was all part of his extended fire family," Walsh said during a gala reception that preceded a performance of the Pageant of the Masters in Laguna Beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1986 | CHRIS PASLES
Not every contemporary composer experiments with dissonance, strange new instruments or arcane theories. Daniel Robbins, whose "Suite for the Ages of Life" will be premiered by Larry Granger and the South Coast Symphony on Saturday, prides himself on writing serious music that is "unashamedly tonal." "Tonality is important enough to stay around for as long as music is around," Robbins said in a recent interview.
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