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August 13, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI
In 1978, as a young, white Southern businessman with strong conservative feelings of alienation about the Democratic Party, F. Borden Hanes Jr. switched his registration to Republican. There was one candidate for the U.S. Senate, in particular, whom Hanes found a politically kindred spirit and for whose reelection campaign Hanes organized a group of other like-minded young men. Hanes recalls that the group raised between $30,000 and $40,000. Their man won. His name: Jesse Helms (R-N.C.).
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
Declaring Aug. 26 as "Art Emergency Day," artists' coalitions nationwide have scheduled rallies to protest pending legislation in Congress that they contend threatens artistic expression and risks censorship. In Los Angeles, an ad hoc group calling itself the Coalition for Freedom of Expression announced Wednesday night that it would stage two rallies next week in front of the Federal Building in Westwood. At 8 p.m.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
Declaring Aug. 26 as "Art Emergency Day," artists' coalitions nationwide have scheduled rallies to protest pending legislation in Congress that they contend threatens artistic expression and risks censorship. In Los Angeles, an ad hoc group calling itself the Coalition for Freedom of Expression announced Wednesday night that it would stage two rallies next week in front of the Federal Building in Westwood. At 8 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI
In 1978, as a young, white Southern businessman with strong conservative feelings of alienation about the Democratic Party, F. Borden Hanes Jr. switched his registration to Republican. There was one candidate for the U.S. Senate, in particular, whom Hanes found a politically kindred spirit and for whose reelection campaign Hanes organized a group of other like-minded young men. Hanes recalls that the group raised between $30,000 and $40,000. Their man won. His name: Jesse Helms (R-N.C.).
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
It began in April as a controversy few people took seriously over two pieces of art many found in questionable taste. But by Thursday morning, a day after the U.S. Senate approved an unprecedented amendment by Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) to bar the National Endowment for the Arts from financing obscene or offensive works, many were calling it a full-blown censorship crisis. Arts observers found themselves questioning the survival, as it is now known, of federal support for cultural institutions.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
The National Council on the Arts has appealed to Congress to scuttle a series of threatened sanctions, saying the political crisis that the agency faces endangers basic concepts of freedom of artistic expression. The resolution was adopted unanimously Saturday, after debate in which the council sometimes appeared uncertain how to defend itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
NEA Post: Rosilyn Alter is the new director of the National Endowment for the Arts' Visual Arts Program, replacing Susan Lubowsky, who resigned two months ago to become director of the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art in Winston-Salem, N.C. Alter most recently has been director of Houston's Sarah Campbell Blaffer Foundation. The NEA's Visual Arts Program has an annual $5-million budget, and receives more than one-quarter of the endowment's 18,000 annual applications for fellowships.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1987
The sixth annual "Awards in the Visual Arts" exhibition, at the Newport Harbor Art Museum through Jan. 3., challenges the notion that New York is the only breeding ground for significant U.S. artists. Administered by the Winston-Salem-based Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, the program honors 10 artists representing 10 areas of the United States, designated according to the density of the artist population.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
U.S. Rep. Sidney Yates (D-Ill.) said Tuesday he will offer legislation to block federal grants to a North Carolina arts agency that supported a controversial photograph featuring a crucifix immersed in the photographer's urine. Under the Yates amendment to a National Endowment for the Arts funding bill, the NEA would be required to make its grants directly to artists, a change in endowment procedures that would affect 200 of the NEA's 4,500 annual grants with an estimated value of $15 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
The National Endowment for the Arts contended Friday that a pending bill that would prohibit support for controversial art would "totally disable" its grant-making apparatus, forcing it to become the federal government's "cultural czar."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
The National Council on the Arts has appealed to Congress to scuttle a series of threatened sanctions, saying the political crisis that the agency faces endangers basic concepts of freedom of artistic expression. The resolution was adopted unanimously Saturday, after debate in which the council sometimes appeared uncertain how to defend itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
It began in April as a controversy few people took seriously over two pieces of art many found in questionable taste. But by Thursday morning, a day after the U.S. Senate approved an unprecedented amendment by Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) to bar the National Endowment for the Arts from financing obscene or offensive works, many were calling it a full-blown censorship crisis. Arts observers found themselves questioning the survival, as it is now known, of federal support for cultural institutions.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1992 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Within the last few weeks, three program directors of various arts disciplines at the National Endowment for the Arts have resigned their posts. Although two of the directors say their departures were not motivated by recent controversies, one of them--Susan Lubowsky of the visual arts program--said that increasing politicization of the NEA figured into her decision.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1989 | LORI SILVER and ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writers
The Senate Wednesday, falling to pressure from conservatives, voted to bar the National Endowment for the Arts from funding "obscene artwork" that denigrates the beliefs of a particular religion. Sponsored by Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), the amendment to the Interior Appropriations bill was approved on a voice vote and sparked little debate. "No artist has a preemptive claim on taxpayer funds" to pay for obscene art, Helms said on the Senate floor. Sen.
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