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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1987
U.S. policy in Southern Africa continues to be weakened by contradictions. As a result, an opportunity to provide leadership at a critical juncture in the politics of the region is being lost. There are two primary and overriding goals: to maintain pressure on South Africa to end apartheid, and to speed independence for Namibia, the last of the African colonies, over which South Africa maintains control in defiance of the United Nations.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 4, 2014 | By Michael McGough
Last week, newspapers reported on the latest wrinkle in one of my favorite recurring stories: the interbreeding between modern humans and the beetle-browed brutes known as Neanderthals. The “introgression” of Neanderthal DNA into the genomes of modern humans apparently happened between 37,000 and 85,000 years ago, when modern humans whose ancestors had left Africa encountered the Neanderthals, remnants of a previous exodus. Last week's news was that the residual Neanderthal DNA may have contributed some advantages, such as skin that could survive cold weather.
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SCIENCE
July 2, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Global warming could drastically alter Africa's southern sand dunes, expanding the desert and destroying the livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of people before 2100, new research warns. Large parts of interior southern Africa are made up of stabilized sand dunes. They are at least partially covered in vegetation and support a population of herders and farmers.
WORLD
January 17, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
The world's largest surviving population of white rhinos suffered its heaviest toll on record last year when poachers killed more than 1,000 of the threatened animals to feed an international market for trinkets and potions made from their horns. The South African Department of Environmental Affairs reported Friday that it had counted 1,004 rhinos killed by poachers in 2013, mostly in Kruger National Park, along the porous border with Mozambique. It was the worst year for rhinoceros poaching since the government began tracking the illegal hunting in the early 1900s, National Geographic reported.
NEWS
January 13, 1985 | Associated Press
Governments that provide loans for the poorest people of the world will be asked to make new contributions to feed the starving in southern Africa, World Bank President A. W. Clausen announced Friday. Representatives of 33 governments have been requested to attend a special two-day meeting this month at which the World Bank will solicit funds for the hungry people of 39 countries south of the Sahara, Clausen said. "The proportion of the world's people in poverty has gone up . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1986 | WILLIAM MINTER, William Minter, a contributing editor of Africa News Service, is author of "King Solomon's Mines Revisited: Western Interests and the Burdened History of Southern Africa" (Basic Books, 1986).
President Samora Machel of Mozambique, who died Sunday in a plane crash, was little known to most Americans. Yet to his country, and to the entire region locked in conflict with South Africa's apartheid regime, his death is comparable in impact to the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. or John F. Kennedy. For Africa, and for millions elsewhere who know Africa, the vibrant revolutionary statesman was one of the continent's modern heroes.
WORLD
November 27, 2006 | Robyn Dixon, Photographs by Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times
In 1990, nine years after the AIDS virus was identified, the map showing the worldwide spread of the disease displayed most of Africa in the palest pink. The infection rate among adults was less than 1%. Since then, the colors have deepened faster here than anywhere else on Earth. Southern Africa now is colored a bloody crimson. The infection rate is more than 15%. The statistics have been repeated so often they cease to shock, even as they soar: 25 million people have died worldwide.
NEWS
December 1, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two startling reports on AIDS show the disease is spreading so rapidly in South Africa that it threatens to cripple the economy and devastate families for decades, perpetuating the ills of apartheid. Released to coincide with World AIDS Day today, the reports say that while the AIDS epidemic was slow in coming to South Africa and its neighbors compared with other parts of the continent, it now has arrived with a vengeance. The region has become the hardest hit in the world.
OPINION
September 21, 1986 | Sanford J. Ungar, Sanford J. Ungar, dean of the School of Communication at American University, is the author of "Africa: The People and Politics of an Emerging Continent," being published in paperback this month (Touchstone Books). and
George P. Shultz has decided to make his first trip to southern Africa as secretary of state. What he should do is take President Reagan along. In a relatively short period of time, Reagan could learn a great deal that would help him untangle and correct current misbegotten American policies in that turbulent part of the world. The visit would be easy to arrange, because the President already has an invitation. Just last month, President Kenneth D.
TRAVEL
March 28, 1999 | LUCY IZON, Lucy Izon is a Toronto-based freelance writer. Internet http://www.izon.com
Affordable hop-on, hop-off backpacker bus transportation services are continuing to expand around the world, including in Africa. Truck About is a new transportation service that is scheduled to begin on June 1. The company, which markets itself to travelers ages 18 to 40, will offer transportation from Nairobi, Kenya, with a guide along three routes, using five 24-seat trucks.
SCIENCE
March 8, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
The largest genetic analysis of African populations to date suggests that modern humans originated in southern Africa about 60,000 years ago, not eastern Africa as is now commonly thought, researchers said Monday. A team from Stanford University found that the Bushmen hunter-gatherers of the Kalahari Desert who speak one of the Khoisan languages characterized by the presence of clicking consonants have the greatest genetic diversity in their DNA of any people in Africa ? and, indeed, the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2010 | Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Edwin S. Munger, a longtime geography professor at Caltech whose specialty was Africa and race relations on the continent, has died. He was 88. Munger died June 15 of prostate cancer at his home in Pasadena, said his wife, Ann. A visiting lecturer at Caltech during the 1950s who became a professor there in 1961, Munger made more than 100 trips to Africa, his wife said. During his years there he worked with the Peace Corps and the U.S. State Department and was the first Fulbright Fellow in Africa.
WORLD
November 7, 2009 | Robyn Dixon
Here's how to pitch this (true) story to Hollywood: Ordinary guy named John, ordinary Sunday, cycling home into a setting sun. Monster roars out of the bushes! John abandons his bike, flees in terror. The creature smashes the bicycle, catches him in a few short strides, grabs him by the shirt. But he slides out of his shirt and falls to the ground. It picks him up again and he slips out of his trousers. Naked, too afraid to even to scream, he scrambles away. But he doesn't get far. The shrieking monster smashes him against a tree.
WORLD
April 23, 2008 | From the Chicago Tribune
Public outcries have forced a rusty Chinese cargo ship to avoid South Africa, Mozambique and Angola, leaving it at sea Tuesday with 77 tons of munitions bound for Zimbabwe, where an election crisis has reportedly turned violent. The An Yue Jiang was carrying about 3 million rounds of Chinese ammunition, 1,500 rockets and 3,000 mortar shells. The State Department's top Africa envoy, who is to arrive in the region today, will urge governments to hold firm against the shipment. Zambian President Levy Mwanawasa this week broke ranks with African colleagues, pressing them to deny the ship access to their ports and prodding landlocked Zimbabwe to release the results of its March 29 presidential vote.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2007 | Tony Perry and Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writers
The U.S. military is embarking on a new effort in Africa to help thwart the rise of Al Qaeda and other terrorist groups and as a first step has launched a $500-million program to train African battalions in desert warfare. And when Uncle Sam commits to a project, contracts for U.S. technology firms are not far beyond. One of the first is a $300,000 deal with Sentek Consulting of San Diego to work with African governments on building an information-sharing system to connect far-flung nations.
OPINION
April 15, 2007 | Helen Epstein, HELEN EPSTEIN is the author of "The Invisible Cure: Africa, the West, and the Fight Against AIDS," which will be published in May.
I'VE BEEN REPORTING on AIDS in Africa for nearly 15 years, but on a 2005 visit to KwaZulu-Natal, the province with South Africa's highest HIV infection rate, the hush surrounding the epidemic was so spooky that it surprised even me. The Catholic Church had been running an AIDS treatment program for more than a year at a local hospital there. Outreach teams set out each day to care for sick people and encourage them to be tested for HIV and, if necessary, join the treatment program.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | WILLIAM CLAIBORNE, The Washington Post
South African, Angolan and Cuban negotiators failed to reach agreement on a southern Africa peace plan and independence for Namibia that they had hoped to sign Saturday. Shortly before flying back to Johannesburg with Foreign Minister Roelof F.
TRAVEL
March 26, 2000 | EDWARD WRIGHT, Edward Wright is a former assistant foreign editor at The Times. His column appears monthly
Africa Southern Africa: Following disastrous flooding in south and central Mozambique, the State Department has advised Americans to delay travel to that country. The caution, effective for the next two months, is presented as a "public announcement" rather than a full-blown travel warning, but it cautions that many roads and bridges are impassable and that the main north-south highway is cut off in many places.
WORLD
November 27, 2006 | Robyn Dixon, Photographs by Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times
In 1990, nine years after the AIDS virus was identified, the map showing the worldwide spread of the disease displayed most of Africa in the palest pink. The infection rate among adults was less than 1%. Since then, the colors have deepened faster here than anywhere else on Earth. Southern Africa now is colored a bloody crimson. The infection rate is more than 15%. The statistics have been repeated so often they cease to shock, even as they soar: 25 million people have died worldwide.
SCIENCE
July 2, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Global warming could drastically alter Africa's southern sand dunes, expanding the desert and destroying the livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of people before 2100, new research warns. Large parts of interior southern Africa are made up of stabilized sand dunes. They are at least partially covered in vegetation and support a population of herders and farmers.
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