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NEWS
February 6, 1987
Southern Air Transport, once owned by the CIA and linked to arms shipments to Iran and the contras fighting the Nicaraguan government, filed a $20-million libel suit in Washington against Newsweek magazine over two photographs and an article that appeared in the magazine's Jan. 26 issue. The suit alleges that the article, "Is There a Contra Drug Connection?"
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NEWS
August 28, 1990 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eugene Hasenfus, who says his life has been on a steady downward slide since being shot down by a Sandinista rocket in 1986 while taking part in the illegal Contra resupply operation, was shot down again here Monday by a federal district court jury considering his claims for back pay and legal fees. After five weeks of testimony and five days of deliberation, the six-member panel found Iran-Contra figure Richard V.
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NEWS
January 14, 1987 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Lt. Col. Oliver L. North warned the FBI in early October that its investigation of Southern Air Transport, a former CIA company then linked to arms deliveries to the Nicaraguan contras , could blow the lid off secret U.S. arms shipments to Iran, government officials said Tuesday. On Oct. 8, shortly after the crash in Nicaragua of an American plane carrying supplies to the contras, North telephoned Oliver B.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A jury in Miami was selected to decide a lawsuit that blames retired Air Force Major Gen. Richard V. Secord and a CIA-linked airline for the 1986 plane crash in Nicaragua that helped trigger the Iran-Contra probe. Cargo handler Eugene Hasenfus, who was captured and held for about three months after Nicaraguan troops shot down the plane, and the family of the plane's co-pilot, Wallace Sawyer Jr.
NEWS
June 12, 1987
Trainee pilot Michael Boyd, 45, tried hard to maintain a correct approach before the Southern Air Transport cargo plane he was trying to land crashed short of the runway at Travis Air Force Base in April, newly released documents indicate. A transcript released in Washington of cockpit conversations as the pilot attempted to land show that the four-engine Lockheed Hercules appeared to lose power in both engines before the crash. Witnesses said the plane pitched and rolled to the left.
NEWS
April 9, 1987 | LEO C. WOLINSKY, Times Staff Writer
A transport plane owned by a charter airline formerly operated by the CIA crashed and exploded while trying to land here late Wednesday, killing all five crew members, the Air Force said. Air Force Master Sgt. Richard Castillo said names of the five crewmen would not be released until relatives are notified. Witnesses said the left wing tip of the four-engine turbo prop Lockheed L-100 Hercules civilian cargo plane struck the ground in a cow pasture about 300 yards short of the runway.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A jury in Miami was selected to decide a lawsuit that blames retired Air Force Major Gen. Richard V. Secord and a CIA-linked airline for the 1986 plane crash in Nicaragua that helped trigger the Iran-Contra probe. Cargo handler Eugene Hasenfus, who was captured and held for about three months after Nicaraguan troops shot down the plane, and the family of the plane's co-pilot, Wallace Sawyer Jr.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1986
Oakland-based Transamerica Airlines announced that it will lease 12 Lockheed Hercules L-100-30 aircraft to Southern Air Transport for about 13 months. At the end of the period, Southern will have an option to buy the planes for $93 million. During the lease, Transamerica will have the right to sell the aircraft to third parties. The new agreement replaces a previous agreement for Southern to buy the 12 planes, plus spare parts, for $82.5 million.
OPINION
July 26, 1987 | Steven Mufson, Steven Mufson, who reported on South Africa for Business Week, was recently expelled from that country
One of the most mysterious details about Lt. Col. Oliver L. North is that our newest hero boasted he had fought in two of our nation's wars: Vietnam and Angola. That's right. Angola. Angola was one of those wars Congress never declared. Most Americans probably don't know the location of the West African nation, the size of New York, California and Texas combined.
NEWS
April 11, 1987 | Associated Press
The Military Airlift Command on Friday temporarily suspended Southern Air Transport Inc. as a cargo hauler for the Pentagon pending a safety investigation of a fatal crash earlier this week. The move against Southern Air, which was once owned by the CIA and in recent months has been linked to the contra aid effort, was prompted by the crash Wednesday of an L-100 Lockheed Hercules cargo plane at Travis Air Force Base, Calif.
NEWS
July 24, 1990 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the almost four years since he was shot down over Nicaragua, helping to touch off what was to become known as the Iran-Contra scandal, life hasn't been easy for Eugene Hasenfus. He says he was out of work for a year, his three children suffer continuing harassment at school and he is more than $100,000 in debt. In April the family's house in Marinette, Wis., burned down. "I wish I could change history, but I can't," Hasenfus, 49, said here Monday. "I just have to live with it."
NEWS
October 7, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Eugene Hasenfus, the American mercenary who was shot down on a supply mission to U.S.-backed rebels in Nicaragua, filed a $35-million lawsuit Tuesday against his former employers, claiming that they left him broke and alone to face mounting legal bills and a hostile public. The Los Angeles Superior Court suit names Iran- contra figures Richard V. Secord and Albert A. Hakim and three corporations that Hasenfus claims employed him with the government's backing to deliver arms to Nicaragua.
OPINION
July 26, 1987 | Steven Mufson, Steven Mufson, who reported on South Africa for Business Week, was recently expelled from that country
One of the most mysterious details about Lt. Col. Oliver L. North is that our newest hero boasted he had fought in two of our nation's wars: Vietnam and Angola. That's right. Angola. Angola was one of those wars Congress never declared. Most Americans probably don't know the location of the West African nation, the size of New York, California and Texas combined.
NEWS
July 15, 1987 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
"I think you will agree that we have had enough questions," Senate Iran- contra committee Chairman Daniel K. Inouye (D-Hawaii) told Lt. Col. Oliver L. North near the end of North's marathon testimony on Wednesday. North nodded. Yet in focusing on broad questions of policy-making and legal principle, the committee--for all its six days of give and take--failed to elicit specific answers to a host of potentially crucial questions about the scandal.
NEWS
June 12, 1987
Trainee pilot Michael Boyd, 45, tried hard to maintain a correct approach before the Southern Air Transport cargo plane he was trying to land crashed short of the runway at Travis Air Force Base in April, newly released documents indicate. A transcript released in Washington of cockpit conversations as the pilot attempted to land show that the four-engine Lockheed Hercules appeared to lose power in both engines before the crash. Witnesses said the plane pitched and rolled to the left.
NEWS
April 11, 1987 | Associated Press
The Military Airlift Command on Friday temporarily suspended Southern Air Transport Inc. as a cargo hauler for the Pentagon pending a safety investigation of a fatal crash earlier this week. The move against Southern Air, which was once owned by the CIA and in recent months has been linked to the contra aid effort, was prompted by the crash Wednesday of an L-100 Lockheed Hercules cargo plane at Travis Air Force Base, Calif.
NEWS
December 18, 1986 | Associated Press
Southern Air Transport advanced money to a secret buyer for purchase of the cargo plane that later was shot down on a weapons supply run to Nicaraguan rebels, the company president said in an interview published Wednesday. The president, William G. Langton, told the Miami Herald that Southern Air paid Harry Doan, a Daytona Beach airplane trader, more than $300,000 for the C-123 cargo plane six months before it was shot down.
NEWS
October 8, 1986 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
The Nicaraguan government Tuesday put on display the American captured after the crash of a contra supply plane and alleged that he and one of the Americans killed in the crash were U.S. military advisers in El Salvador. Looking dirty and sunburned, American Eugene Hasenfus appeared briefly at a press conference in Managua and acknowledged in a terse statement that he had been captured by Sandinista troops in southern Nicaragua.
NEWS
April 9, 1987 | LEO C. WOLINSKY, Times Staff Writer
A transport plane owned by a charter airline formerly operated by the CIA crashed and exploded while trying to land here late Wednesday, killing all five crew members, the Air Force said. Air Force Master Sgt. Richard Castillo said names of the five crewmen would not be released until relatives are notified. Witnesses said the left wing tip of the four-engine turbo prop Lockheed L-100 Hercules civilian cargo plane struck the ground in a cow pasture about 300 yards short of the runway.
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