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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1997 | From Religion News Service
Southern Baptists affirmed support for the display of the Ten Commandments in public buildings and urged Bible publishers to hold to "historic principles of biblical translation" in resolutions this week at their annual national gathering. The measures were approved Thursday, the day after delegates to the Southern Baptist Convention overwhelmingly passed by a show of hands a resolution encouraging a boycott of the Walt Disney Co.
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NATIONAL
June 20, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
The Southern Baptist Convention, the nation's largest Protestant denomination, has approved an alternative name that will allow churches to distance themselves from the organization's past ties to slavery and racism. Great Commission Baptists, the alternative name, was endorsed by 53% of the 4,800 ballots cast at the convention's annual meeting in New Orleans, officials said. The change marks another step in the predominantly white denomination's efforts to become more inclusive.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1991 | Associated Press
The Rev. Paige Patterson, a key strategist in the fundamentalist rise to dominance among Southern Baptists, was reinstated as president of Criswell College a week after he was fired. College trustees, who dismissed him for spending too much time in church politicking, reversed themselves after fundamentalist leaders and students rallied to his support. "We just prayed and came together in the spirit of the Lord," said the Rev.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2000 | ANDRE BRISCOE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After six months of tension with city officials, a church was granted a conditional use permit for a homeless shelter it plans to build on its property. Bible-toting supporters and homeless people living at the First Southern Baptist Church packed the council chamber Wednesday evening in a show of support for the cause and its leader, the Rev. Wiley Drake. Drake said he was "ecstatic" about the decision.
NATIONAL
June 20, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
The Southern Baptist Convention, the nation's largest Protestant denomination, has approved an alternative name that will allow churches to distance themselves from the organization's past ties to slavery and racism. Great Commission Baptists, the alternative name, was endorsed by 53% of the 4,800 ballots cast at the convention's annual meeting in New Orleans, officials said. The change marks another step in the predominantly white denomination's efforts to become more inclusive.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1990 | GEORGE W. CORNELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A single student circulated a letter accusing a widely respected, longtime seminary professor of wrong teaching. The jarring result was an extensive investigation involving the interrogation of nearly all the professor's students about his views. The drastic, inquisitorial process at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Ky., flagship of the denomination's ministerial education, reflects the mistrust pervading the country's largest Protestant body.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2000 | ANA CHOLO-TIPTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The outspoken pastor of First Southern Baptist Church has agreed to correct code violations on the site where he plans to build a homeless shelter at his Buena Park church. The Rev. Wiley Drake first attracted attention in 1996 when neighbors began complaining that he was letting homeless people stay at the church. City inspectors cited him for building and health code violations, and in 1997 he was convicted of four misdemeanors and ordered to complete 1,500 hours of community service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1997 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Southern Baptist preacher who violated city ordinances by allowing homeless people to live on church property was spared a jail sentence on Friday, but his church was ordered to comply with city building codes. Municipal Judge Gregg L. Prickett sentenced the Rev. Wiley S. Drake to 1,500 hours of community service, which was immediately credited in light of the pastor's work with the indigent, and a $100 fine, which was later waived.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2000 | ANDRE BRISCOE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After six months of tension with city officials, a church was granted a conditional use permit for a homeless shelter it plans to build on its property. Bible-toting supporters and homeless people living at the First Southern Baptist Church packed the council chamber Wednesday evening in a show of support for the cause and its leader, the Rev. Wiley Drake. Drake said he was "ecstatic" about the decision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1991 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Standing inside the nearly completed sanctuary of his Shepherd of the Hills Church several weeks ago, the Rev. Jess Moody said he was hoping the congregation's costly, oft-delayed move from Van Nuys to Chatsworth was about over. "We got a few bugs to get rid of," Moody remarked. Just then, Don Goeschl, the church's building supervisor, reached down on the carpet and caught a cricket in his hand. "And there's one of them!" said the pastor known for his jocular, often flamboyant statements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2000 | ANA CHOLO-TIPTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The outspoken pastor of First Southern Baptist Church has agreed to correct code violations on the site where he plans to build a homeless shelter at his Buena Park church. The Rev. Wiley Drake first attracted attention in 1996 when neighbors began complaining that he was letting homeless people stay at the church. City inspectors cited him for building and health code violations, and in 1997 he was convicted of four misdemeanors and ordered to complete 1,500 hours of community service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1997 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Southern Baptist preacher who violated city ordinances by allowing homeless people to live on church property was spared a jail sentence on Friday, but his church was ordered to comply with city building codes. Municipal Judge Gregg L. Prickett sentenced the Rev. Wiley S. Drake to 1,500 hours of community service, which was immediately credited in light of the pastor's work with the indigent, and a $100 fine, which was later waived.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1997 | From Religion News Service
Southern Baptists affirmed support for the display of the Ten Commandments in public buildings and urged Bible publishers to hold to "historic principles of biblical translation" in resolutions this week at their annual national gathering. The measures were approved Thursday, the day after delegates to the Southern Baptist Convention overwhelmingly passed by a show of hands a resolution encouraging a boycott of the Walt Disney Co.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1991 | Associated Press
The Rev. Paige Patterson, a key strategist in the fundamentalist rise to dominance among Southern Baptists, was reinstated as president of Criswell College a week after he was fired. College trustees, who dismissed him for spending too much time in church politicking, reversed themselves after fundamentalist leaders and students rallied to his support. "We just prayed and came together in the spirit of the Lord," said the Rev.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1990 | GEORGE W. CORNELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A single student circulated a letter accusing a widely respected, longtime seminary professor of wrong teaching. The jarring result was an extensive investigation involving the interrogation of nearly all the professor's students about his views. The drastic, inquisitorial process at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Ky., flagship of the denomination's ministerial education, reflects the mistrust pervading the country's largest Protestant body.
NEWS
April 6, 1985 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
If long-term trends continue, the once-dominant liberal and moderate denominations will soon become a minority in American Protestantism. Presbyterian, Episcopal, Methodist and like congregations came to be called "mainline churches" this century because they not only attracted educated, middle-class people but also represented the great majority of U.S. Protestants. In 1920, mainline bodies constituted 76% of America's Protestant population, but by last year that figure had fallen to 53%.
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